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Slave Narrative of Nan Stewart

Interviewer: Sarah Probst Person Interviewed: Nan Stewart Location: Ohio Place of Birth: Charleston, West Virginia Date of Birth: February 1850 Age: 87 Sarah Probst, Reporter Audrey Meighen, Author-Editor Jun 9, 1937 Folklore Meigs County, District Three [HW: Middeport] “I’se bawned Charl’stun, West Virginia in February 1850.” “My mammy’s name? Hur name wuz Kath’run Paine an’ she wuz bawned down Jackson County, Virginia. My pappy wuz John James, a coopah an’ he wuz bawned at Rock Creek, West Virginia. He cum’d ovah heah with Lightburn’s Retreat. Dey all crossed de ribah at Buffington Island. Yes, I had two bruthahs and three sistahs. Deir wuz Jim, Thomas, he refugeed from Charl’stun to Pum’roy and it tuk him fo’ months, den de wuz sistah Adah, Carrie an’ Ella. When I rite young I wurked as hous’ maid fo’ numbah quality white folks an’ latah on I wuz nurs’ fo’ de chilluns in sum homes, heah abouts.” “Oh, de slaves quartahs, dey wuz undah de sam’ ruf with Marse Hunt’s big hous’ but in de back. When I’se littl’ I sleeped in a trun’l bed. My mammy wuz mighty ‘ticlar an’ clean, why she made us chilluns wash ouah feets ebry night fo’ we git into de bed.” “When Marse Hunt muved up to Charl’stun, my mammy and pappy liv’ in log cabin.” “My gran’ mammy, duz I ‘member hur? Honey chile, I shure duz. She wuz my pappy’s mammy. She wuz one hun’erd and fo’ yeahs ol’ when she die rite in hur cheer. Dat mawhin’ she eat a big hearty brekfast. One day I ‘member she sezs to Marse Hunt, ‘I...

Biography of Isaac W. Pfost

The Virginians have given to nearly every state in the union much of the good blood and good citizenship, for, wherever his lot is cast, the Virginian is patriotic and does honor to his environments. Idaho has many well known citizens of Virginian birth, but not one who is more highly regarded for integrity and perseverance and all the other qualities which make for real success than Isaac W. Pfost, of Boise, who, having been born in Virginia prior to its division, is literally a native of the Old Dominion. Isaac W. Pfost, proprietor of the Bancroft Hotel, Boise, Idaho, was born in Jackson County, Virginia, January 21, 1846, a son of Abraham and Elizabeth (Rader) Pfost. His father and mother were likewise natives of Virginia. Abraham Pfost died at the age of sixty-two. Their son, Isaac W. Pfost, was reared and educated in the county of his nativity. In the fall of 1865, when he was nineteen years old, he went to Cooper County, Missouri. A year later he went to Bates County, in the same state, where for two years he was engaged in farming. He then removed to Henry county, Missouri, where he became the owner of a farm, which he operated successfully until 1876, when he sold it and engaged in the grocery business at Montrose, Missouri, in which enterprise he prospered until, out of the kindness of his heart and with the motive of helping others, he became security on financial paper which he was forced to redeem and which caused him to lose nearly everything he had accumulated. He managed to pay all...

Biography of John Hartley Smith

John Hartley Smith, the founder and president of the First National Bank of San Bernardino, and one of the most thorough business men and experienced bankers in Southern California, was born in Jackson County, Virginia, in 1835. He came to Ohio at the age of fifteen, and in 1853 he came to California and spent two years in the gold mines, chiefly in Mariposa County. He was quite successful, and in 1855 returned to Ohio with considerable money and a fund of experience which has proved of great value to him in his subsequent business career, as well as fraught with pleasant memories. Coming he sailed from New York by way of Panama, crossing the Isthmus on foot. He returned by the same route, but the railroad had been completed across the Isthmus in the interval. For many years Mr. Smith was extensively engaged in steam boating and operating barge lines on the Ohio and Mississippi rivers, he superintending the business, in which there was $250,000 capital invested. After the war he was also interested in the banking business for a number of years in Meigs County; and was actively and largely identified with coal mining and the manufacture of salt in south-eastern Ohio. The daily output of the coalmines was 10,000 bushels, and the salt works turned out 500 barrels a day. The labor and nerve force necessarily consumed in the management of these various large enterprises proved too much for Mr. Smith’s naturally strong constitution, and he was compelled to dispose of his very prosperous business interests, and seek by rest and the most favorable climatic advantages...

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