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Biographical Sketch of Joseph Debenedetti

The life of a successful father, standing before him as an example, Joseph Debenedetti forsook Italy’s sunny skies for the western lands of California. His father, John came to the United States in 1855, and in 1856 removed to the west. He mined for a short period, engaged in the mercantile business in San Francisco, and then went to Santa Clara where he died. Joseph Debenedetti was born in 1849. When only six years old he firmly made up his active mind to follow his father across the sea. In 1867 he set out for San Francisco via’ Central America, and after his arrival he went to Calaveras County where he spent 10 months. He then returned to San Francisco, and for two years engaged in trading with remote settlers in the county. In 1872 he came to Halfmoon Bay and a year later opened a general merchandise store. In 1874 Mr. Debenedetti married Teresa Scarpa. Seven of their nine children are living, Mrs. Josephine Michieli, John L., Mrs. Angelina Francis, George, William. Mrs. Irene Bettencourt, and Henry. Politically Mr. Debenedetti was a Democrat and as a recognition, he was appointed postmaster by President Cleveland. He served as a supervisor of San Mateo County for 12 years, and while in this office he let the contract for the bridge over Paraleside Creek at Halfmoon Bay, the first concrete bridge erected in San Mateo County. He belongs to the I. O. O. F. Mr. Debenedetti died May 18,...

Biography of Charles Dickens

Novelist and Social Reformer. In these days when critics so often repeat the cry of ‘art for art’s sake’ and denounce Ruskin for bringing moral canons into his judgments of pictures or buildings, it is dangerous to couple these two titles together, and to label Dickens as anything but a novelist pure and simple. And indeed, all would admit that the creator of Sam Weller and Sarah Gamp will live when the crusade against ‘Bumbledom’ and its abuses is forgotten and the need for such a crusade seems incredible. But when so many recent critics have done justice to his gifts as a creative artist, this aspect of his work runs no danger of being forgotten. Moreover, when we are considering Dickens as a Victorian worthy and as a representative man of his age, it is desirable to bring out those qualities, which he shared with so many of his great contemporaries. Above all, we must remember that Dickens himself would be the last man to be ashamed of having written ‘with a purpose’, or to think that the fact should be concealed as a blemish in his art. There was nothing in which he felt more genuine pride than in the thought that his talents thus employed had brought public opinion to realize the need for many practical reforms in our social condition. If these old abuses have mostly passed away, we may be thankful indeed; but we cannot feel sure that in the future fresh abuses will not arise with which the example of Dickens may inspire others to wage war. His was a strenuous life; he...

Biography of Joseph Lister

In a corner of the north transept of Westminster Abbey, almost lost among the colossal statues of our prime ministers, our judges, and our soldiers, will be found a small group of memorials preserving the illustrious names of Darwin, Lister, Stokes, Adams, and Watt, and reminding us of the great place which Science has taken in the progress of the last century. Watt, thanks partly to his successors, may be said to have changed the face of this earth more than any other inhabitant of our isles; but he is of the eighteenth century, and between those who developed his inventions it is not easy to choose a single representative of the age. Stokes and Adams command the admiration of all students of mathematics who can appreciate their genius, but their work makes little appeal to the average man. In Darwin’s case no one would dispute his claim to represent worthily the scientists of the age, and his life is a noble object for study, single-hearted as he was in his devotion to truth, persistent as were his efforts in the face of prolonged ill-health. No better instance could be found to show that the highest intellectual genius may be found united with the most endearing qualities of character. Kindly and genial in his home, warmly attached to his friends, devoid of all jealousy of his fellow scientists, he lived to see his name honored throughout the civilized world; and many who are incapable of appreciating his originality of mind can find an inspiring example in the record of his life. There is no need to make comparisons either...

Biographical Sketch of Frank Ray Walker

Walker, Frank Ray; architect; born, Pittsfield, Mass., Sept. 29, 1877; son of Frank and Helen Theresa Rauous Walker; educated, Massachusetts Institute of Technology; post graduate work in design; pursued study of architecture in France and Italy, 1903-1904; Walker & Weeks, architects; member Cleveland Engineering Society, Chamber of Commerce, Cleveland Chapter, American Institute, M. I. T., Alumni Ass ‘n, Northern Ohio; member Hermit, Athletic, M. I. T. Clubs, New York City; East End Tennis Club, Cleveland Y. M. C....

Biographical Sketch of Benjamin D. Nicola

Nicola, Benjamin D.; attorney; born, Italy, March 17, 1879; son of Vincenzo and Pasqua Miraldi Nicola; educated, Urichsville, O., High School, 1897; Ohio State University 1897-1901, LL. B., 1900; married Midvale, O., June 29, 1905, Harriet M. Stuckey; issue, four children, Kenneth, Esther, Margaret and Samuel; has practiced law in Cleveland since Jan. 1, 1905; member Chamber of Commerce, Odd Fellows, Tippecanoe...

Biographical Sketch of Silvio Martinelli

SILVIO MARTINELLI – As a pleader before the courts at Springfield, Mr. Martinelli represents the highest interests of his profession, and in civic matters he has proven a capable and popular official. He is the son of Clayton Martinelli, a lumber dealer, who was born in Italy, and Rosa (Nicoli) Martenelli, a native of Italy. Silvio Martinelli was born August 3, 1883, in Italy, where he attended the high school, afterwards graduating at the American International College, with the class of 1907, and he received his degree of Bachelor of Laws at the Valparaiso, Indiana, Law School in the class of 1910. He was admitted to the Indiana bar in 1910, and to the Massachusetts bar in 1912, when he established his offices at Springfield. Active in the interests of the Republican party, Mr. Martinelli was a member of the city government from 1914 to 1916, and he served as police commissioner in 1919-21. He served as attorney for the Italian Consulate in Western Massachusetts for over twelve years, and was appointed public administrator in 1923 by Governor Co1. Mr. Martinelli’s fraternal affiliations are with Springfield Lodge, Benevolent and Protective Order of Elks; and he is a member of the Hampden County Bar and the American Bar associations; the Oxford Country Club; Springfield Trapshooting Club, and the Italian Brotherly Union. Silvio Martinelli married, August 8, 1912, May T. Moriarty, born in Springfield, daughter of Thomas Moriarty, a native of Ireland, and Margaret (Keating) Moriarity, of Springfield; and they are the parents of two children : Rosemary, born April 7, 1920, and Silvio Thomas, born July 29,...

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