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Biography of Marshall M. Murdock

Marshall M. Murdock, a pioneer journalist of Kansas, the founder of the Wichita Eagle and one of the marked men of the commonwealth, was born in the Pierpont settlement of what is now West Virginia, in 1837. He was of Scotch-Irish ancestry, and his father married into the Governor Pierpont family. Soon after his marriage the family moved to Ironton, Southern Ohio, and there Marshall Murdock attended the public schools and commenced to learn the printer’s trade. Thomas Murdock, the father, was unsuccessful in his business venture, and, as he had an abhorrence of slavery and Kansas was then the most pronounced champion of abolitionism in the West, he decided to try his fortune in that part of the country. The family and the household goods were therefore loaded into two covered wagons and a start was made for Topeka; the father drove one team and Marshall, the son, the other. After an overland journey of several weeks they reached their destination and Thomas Murdock settled on a farm near Topeka. When gold was discovered in the Pike’s Peak region, Marshall Murdock started for the excitement, and is said to have been the first to discover silver on the site of Leadville. While he was in the gold fields, the Civil war broke out, his father and two of his brothers enlisted, and he returned to Kansas to care for the younger members of the famliy. He found employment in the printing office at Lawrence, narrowly escaped the Quantrill raiders and at the threatened invasion of Kansas by Price entered the Union service as lieutenant-colonel of the Osage and...

Boyd County, Kentucky

BOYD CO. (Carl F. Hall) The Commonwealth of Kentucky, having for a northern boundary the Ohio River-the dividing line between the northern free states and the southern slave states has always been regarded as a southern state. As in the other states of the old south, slavery was an institution until the Thirteenth Ammendment to the Constitution of the United States gave the negro freedom in 1865. Kentucky did not, as other southern states, secede from the Union, but attempted to be neutral during the Civil War. The people, however, were divided in their allegience, furnishing recruits for both the Federal and Confederate armies. The president of the Union, Abraham Lincoln, and the president of the Confederacy, Jefferson Davis, both were born in this state. Boyd County was formed in 1860 from parts of Lawrence, Greenup and Carter Counties, and we are unable to find any records, in Boyd County, as to slave holders and their slaves, though it is known that many well to do families the Catletts, Davis, Poages, Williams and others were slave holders. Slaves were not regarded as persons, had no civil rights and were owned just as any other chattel property, were bought and sold like horses and cattle, and knew no law but the will of their white masters and like other domestic animals could be, and were, acquired and disposed of without regard to family ties or other consideration. Usually, as each slave represented a large investment of money, they were well cared for, being adequately fed, clothed and sheltered, having medical attention when sick. As, along the border in Kentucky, there...

Biography of Thomas Shirman Salathiel

Thomas Shirman Salathiel for twenty-two years had been in the practice of law at Independence, and is one of the ablest members of the profession in Southern Kansas. In that time he had handled a vast volume of litigation involving both private and public interests, and as a lawyer, business man and citizem had identified himself closely with the life and affairs of his home city. A native Kansan, he represents a family that had lived here since territorial days. His grandfather, Morgan Salathiel, was a native of Wales and was a mineralogist and geologist. In the service of a syndicate that was acquiring coal lands in Peunsylvania and Ohio he came to America in 1832, and carried on an extensive series of investigations over the coal areas of those two states. He made permanent settlement in that section of Southern Ohio known as the Hanging Rock Iron Region, near the present City of Ironton, but later moved to Cincinnati, where he died about 1849. John Salathiel, father of the Independence lawyer, was a Kansas pioneer. He was born in 1836 in Southern Ohio at the site of Ironton, spent his early life in that state, and in 1859 came out to Kansas and located in Douglas County near Lawrence. Subsequently he clerked in a store and finally engaged in business for himself. In 1862 he moved to a farm of eighty acres eight miles west of Lawrence, where the subject of this sketch was born. While living there he joined P. B. Plumb’s Company to assist in repelling the raid of Quantrill’s outlaws upon Lawrence. Later he volunteered...

Biographical Sketch of Clark W. Sloan

Sloan, Clark W.; optometrist; born, Ironton, O., Oct. 18, 1875; son of Ezra C. and Mary C. Wood Sloan, D. D. S.; educated, Ironton Grammar and High School, Chicago Ophthalmic College, 1899, and post graduate courses; married, Ironton, 1893, Frances E. Donohoe; issue, one son, and three daughters; six years with the Bowler & Burdick Co.; one year with The Webb C. Ball Co.; established his own office in 1903; pres. Cleveland Optometrical Society, 1908-1910; vice pres. Ohio State Optical Ass’n, 1909; pres. Ohio State Optical Ass’n, 1910-1912; member Finance and Educational Committees, American Optical Ass’n, 1910-1911; active in promoting legislation to elevate standards of optometry by compulsory qualifications of those engaged in correcting defective sight by glasses; member City Advertising, and Rotary...

Biographical Sketch of James Hood

James Hood, farming and stock; P. O. Arcola; the subject of this sketch was born in West Union, Adams Co., Ohio, Oct. 29, 1834. He married Miss Sarah E. Willson Jan. 1, 1861; she was born in Adams Co., Ohio; they have seven children, viz., John E., Mary S., Sarah B., James W., Annie E., Robert B. and Clara Dell. His father was engaged in general merchandise, and he assisted in the business until he was about 26 years of age; he then came West and herded cattle in this neighborhood for one year; he then went back to Ohio and engaged in the milling business, renting his father’s grist-mill; he followed the business one year; he then came West and improved a farm in this township, remaining here one year; he again went back to Ohio, and engaged as assistant manager of the Etna Furnace, at Ironton, Ohio, and followed the business three years, when for the third time he came West, and finished the improvements on his farm, and lived there until 1877, when he came to his present place. He is no office-seeker, and has held no office except connected with the schools. He owns 500 acres in this...

Biography Of Thomas Benton Murdock

In 1841 Thomas Benton Murdock was born in the mountains of Virginia. He was one of the five children who lived to maturity of Thomas Murdock and Katherine Pierrepont. On the mother’s side came the pride of the Pierrepont; from the father’s the insurgent instincts of the Irish Murdocks who left Ireland after the Irish rebellion failed in 1798. Though reared in the mountains among the most simple people and most primitive surroundings, the Murdocks who have been known in Kansas for half a century have proved soldiers of the militant democracy. They have been fighters who led naturally, by instinct and training, but never fighters for the old order. They always were pioneers, always moving out into new territory of thought and action, looking forward. Thomas and Katherine Murdock could not endure the iniquity of slavery, so in 1849 they freed their slaves and left the slave country for Ohio. They settled near Ironton, along the Ohio River, but lost everything they had in the panic of 1855. Loading their household goods upon a boat, they went down the Ohio to the Mississippi and journeyed as far west as Mount Pleasant, Iowa. There the family spent the winter, and the father went to Kansas and found a location. He brought his family to Topeka in the winter of 1856-57. They rented a little hotel and kept tavern, among others having for guests Jim Lane and A. D. Stevens, famous as a border fighter under Montgomery and afterward killed at Harper’s Ferry under old John Brown. Going and coming in the little Kansas town of the Virginia abolitionist were...

Biography of Daniel M. Sechler

Daniel M. Sechler, founder of the D. M. Sechler Carriage Company, of Moline, Illinois, was born March 4, 1818, at Danville, Pennsylvania, and died at his home in Cincinnati, Ohio, May 27, 1903. Mr. Sechler’s forefathers, in the days of the persecution of John Huss, were obliged to flee for refuge from Austria, taking up their abode in Holland, from which country, in 1685, Mr. Sechler’s great great grandfather emigrated to America, locating near William Penn’s town of Philadelphia. His grandson, John Sechler, a revolutionary soldier, founded the town of Danville, the birthplace not only of the subject of this sketch, but also of his father, Rudolph Sechler, and his mother, Susannah (nee Douty). His wife’s parents were Thomas and Catharine (nee Angstadt) Mackey. Mr. and Mrs. Sechler had but one son, Thomas M:, whose biographical sketch follows this one. Daniel M. Sechler’s early education was acquired in the public schools, of his native town, supplemented by several terms in the local academy. At seventeen years of age he began his apprenticeship at the carriage maker’s trade, in the City of Port Deposit, Maryland. Four years later he entered into a copartnership with a Mr. Ball, under the firm name of Ball & Sechler, Carriage Manufacturers, at Milton, Pennsylvania. During this period Mr. Ball died. Mr. Sechler continued the business for three years thereafter, producing from fifty to seventy-five carriages per year, and then disposing of his establishment, removed to Wooster, Ohio, where he lived in retirement for a time. Later he operated a foundry in Adams County, Ohio, and in 1852 he took the management of the pattern...

Biography of Thomas M. Sechler

Moline is a city of manufacturers, one of the most prominent of whom is the subject of this sketch, Thomas M. Sechler. He was born October 25, 1841, in Milton, Northumberland County, Pennsylvania, at which place his father, D. M. Sechler, at that time conducted a carriage factory. His father, Daniel Montgomery Sechler, was born at Danville, Pennsylvania, March 4, 1818, and his mother, Pamela (Mackey) Sechler, was born in Rutland Township, Berks County, Pennsylvania, December 19, 1819. She is still living at her home in Cincinnati, Ohio. T. M. Sechler’s paternal great-great-great grandfather came from Holland in 1685, together with a brother, and settled in William Penn’s territory near Philadelphia. The brother settled in North Carolina, and one hundred and seventy-eight years later the descendants of these two brothers were to be found in the ranks of the opposing armies in the war of the Rebellion. The great-grandfather, John Sechler, born March 20, 1739, died December 21, 1831, was a soldier in the American army during the Revolution, from 1776 to 1778. He was born in Philadelphia County, Pennsylvania, and after the close of the Revolutionary war he moved to Columbia County in the same State, where he founded the town of Danville, now the county seat of Montour County. Mr. Sechler’s maternal grandmother, Susannah (Douty) Sechler, was born April 27, 1781, and died September 8, 1871. She was descended on her mother’s side from John Cooper, one of the early settlers in Plymouth Colony, Massachusetts, where he came in 1628. Her father, John Douty, was also a Revolutionary soldier, and was taken prisoner by the British at...

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