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Biography of Albert P. McBride

Albert P. McBride. In the oil and gas districts of the Southwest no name had a greater significance as an operator, developer, and as a vitalizer of the resources and industries covering several states, than that of Albert P. McBride of Independence. Mr. McBride began his operations as an oil well contractor and producer more than thirty-five years ago. He had supplied enthusiasm, faith and much of the material means necessary to develop the oil and gas resources of Kansas, Oklahoma and Texas. Associated throughout practically all his career with C. L. Bloom, he bore the brunt of responsibilities in opening up the oil and gas districts of this section of the country, and passed successfully through the period of discouragement and vicissitudes. He is a native Kansan, and was born in Miami County February 20, 1862. Doubtless the resourcefulness and energy which have characterized his own life came from his worthy ancestry. He is of Scotch, Irish and English lineage, and his first American forefathers, settled in Old Virginia as early as 1730. From Virginia the family went west to Tennessee. There is a record that James McBride accompanied by four brothers left the highlands of Scotland in 1730 and settled in the colony of Virginia. The names of the brothers were William, Jaseth, John and Andrew. All these brothers fought in the French and Indian wars in the notable campaign led by Braddock through the western wilderness of Pennsylvania. Three of them were killed at Braddock’s field. William and James were left to carry on the family lineage. William McBride subsequently lost his life at the hands...

Biography of Benjamin B. Harris

Benjamin B. Harris, attorney at law, City Clerk of San Bernardino, and treasurer of the Society of California Pioneers-of San Bernardino County, was born in Hanover County, Virginia, in 1824. When seventeen years of age he went to Nashville, Tennessee, and was there educated, graduating at Nashville University in 1845; studied law in a private office in that State, and was admitted to the bar of Tennessee. In 1847 he went to Panola County, Texas, expecting to remain there permanently, but the climate being malarious he suffered with liver troubles, which necessitated a change in his purposes. After the discovery of gold in California, he resolved to emigrate to the new El Dorado, and in March, 1849, started with a pack mule train of fifty-two men, to cross the plains, coming by the way of old El Paso, Chihuahua, Santa Cruz, Mexico, through Tucson and Yuma, Arizona. They had some trouble with the Apache Indians, who dogged their trail for days, and with whom they had a bloodless skirmish or two; the Indians knowing the superiority of the emigrants’ fire-arms, kept out of range of their guns. On crossing the Colorado river, where Yuma is now situated, they found it swollen by the melting mountain snows, to the width of 1 500 feet, and it was found necessary to improvise a ferry-boat in which to bring over their party, together with the baggage and supplies. This was done by appropriating the body of an abandoned wagon, making it water-tight by caulking the cracks with strips secured by tearing their shirts, and then pouring in melted beef tallow, which hardened...

Biography of John Milton Cunningham

John Milton Cunningham. Of the men who have long lent dignity and progressiveness to the business of ranching and farming in Osage County none are held in higher esteem than is John Milton Cunningham, who is now a resident of Caney and one of that city’s leading and influential citizens. During a long and successful career he has been identified prominently with financial matters in several parts of the country, but has always returned to agriculture as a vocation, and in this calling has found his greatest measure of prosperity. Mr. Cunningham was born in the City of Louisville, Kentucky, November 10, 1857, and is a son of Robert Morrison and Annie Elizabeth (Milton) Cunningham. His father was born in Green County, Alabama, March 13, 1829, and as a lad was taken to Louisville, Kentucky, in the schools of which city he was given a good education. His parents were Joseph Parks and Elizabeth F. (Webb) Cunningham, and he was brought up to habits of industry and honesty. Early becoming interested in financial affairs, he was connected with banking all of his life, and at the time of his death, November 25, 1878, was cashier of the First National Bank of Louisville, of which he had been the organizer. Mr. Cunningham was a deacon in the Presbyterian Church and one of his city’s substantial and highly respected citizens. He was married at Louisville, November 7, 1854, to Annie Elizabeth Milton, who was born at Lexington, Kentucky, January 15, 1832, and died at Louisville, February 22, 1895, and they became the parents of the following children: Bettie Scott, born December...

Biography of George L. Banks

George L. Banks. A sterling pioneer and citizen who is now living virtually retired in the City of Independence, Mr. Banks is specially entitled to recognition in this history. He was one of the early settlers of Montgomery County and has contributed his full quota to its civic and industrial development and progress, and he was long one of the prominent and influential exponents of agricultural industry in this section of the state. High honors also are his for the valiant service which he gave as a soldier of the Union in the Civil war. Mr. Banks was born in Lake County, Indiana, October 13, 1839. His father, Orin Banks, was born in the State of New York, in 1800, and was there reared to manhood, his marriage having been solemnized in Schoharie County, that state. His entire active career was one of close association with the basic industry of agriculture and he was one of the pioncer farmers of LaPorte County, Indiana, where he established his home in 1845. In about 1850 he removed to Lake County, Indiana, where he died in 1856. He was a supporter of the democratic party until the organization of the republican party, when he transferred his allegiance to the latter. He was influential in community affairs and was called upon to serve in various township offices. Both he and his wife were devout members of the Baptist Church, in which he served as a deacon. Mrs. Banks, whose maiden name was Olive Brown, was born in Schoharie County, New York, in 1803, and thus she was eighty-three years old at the time...

Biography of R. W. Cates

R. W. Cates is a director and assistant cashier in the First National Bank of Independence. By profession he is a lawyer and practiced for a number of years with his father, Joseph B. F. Cates, who is one of the oldest members of the legal profession in Kansas. Joseph B. F. Cates, who is now general attorney for the Prairie Pipe Line Company, with residence at Independence, was born in Grainger County, Tennessee, April 19, 1840. His parents were Charles and Elizabeth (Lloyd) Cates. Charles Cates was a native of North Carolina, where he was reared and educated, and his English ancestors had settled in the Carolinas when they were English colonies. Charles Cates was a farmer, and from his native state emigrated to Tennessee and became a pioneer settler. His wife, Elizabeth Lloyd, was also a native of North Carolina, and of Welsh ancestry. The only survivor in a family of three sons and three daughters, all of whom reached maturity, and the youngest of the family, Joseph B. F. Cates, gained his high rank in the profession as a result of many years of constant application and the over-coming of difficulties when he was young. His boyhood was spent in Tennessee, where he attended the common schools, his schooling being mingled with the performance of duties on the home farm. In 1860 he graduated from an old institution of higher training in Eastern Tennessee, Newman College, in Jefferson County. His classical diploma was hardly in his possession when he set out for the West. Before the Civil war broke out he helped survey some of the...

Biography of Charles Trumbull Hayden

Charles Trumbull Hayden, whose name is linked with the early history of Arizona, was born in Windsor, Connecticut, April 4th, 1825. When eighteen years old he taught school in New Jersey, and afterwards near New Albany, Indiana, and in St. Louis, Missouri. In 1848 he loaded a wagon with merchandise, and left Independence, Missouri, for Santa Fe, New Mexico, where he marketed his goods and returned in the fall. He continued in business at Independence for some time, but when the gold excitement began in 1849, he outfitted a train of ox teams, and started over the Santa Fe Trail. He arrived in Santa Fe late in 1849, and met some parties from California, who bought his outfit, consisting of fourteen wagons loaded with supplies, each drawn by six yoke of oxen. He then returned to Missouri to purchase another stock of goods and establish himself in business in Santa Fe. He was a passenger upon the first Overland Stage to Tucson in 1858, to which place he moved his stock of goods from Santa Fe and established himself in business there. He engaged in contracting with the Government for the furnishing of supplies to the soldiers and did a large freighting business to the mines, hauling supplies in, and ore out. He had many freight teams and brought his merchandise in these early days from Port Ysabel on the Gulf of California. After the close of the Civil War, supplies were brought up the Gulf of California from California. Mr. Hayden was appointed the first Probate Judge at Tucson under the laws of New Mexico, and bore his...

Biography of Hon. Andrew McAlexander

It is with especial pleasure that we are enabled to recite the salient points in the eventful and lengthy career of the distinguished and prominent citizen of Wallowa county, whose name is at the head of this article, since his life has been spent in the noble and self-sacrificing work of the pioneer, wherein he has served with the faithfulness, ability, integrity and energy that are characteristic of him, being a potent influence in the development of two states and having wrought in Oregon, so that his memory will be handed down to generations to come with expressions of appreciation and esteem. Mr. McAlexander was born in Virginia, near Richmond, on August 15, 1815, being the son of Samuel and Elizabeth (Ware) McAlexander, natives also, of Virginia. Our subject’s father did valiant service in the war of 1812, being an officer in that conflict, and the grandfather of our subject, a native of Scotland, was an officer in the most memorable of all struggles that have had to do with our nation, the Revolutionary war. The ancestors were pioneers of this country in colonial days and assisted in laying the foundations of the greatest of all nations on the earth today, and our subject has continued this work in pioneering in Missouri and in this state, where he has been a prominent figure, as later detail will manifest. Andrew remained at home, gaining a good education and learning the brick mason’s trade, until he had arrived at the age of twenty-two years, then came to Missouri. He perfected himself in the builder’s art, and did pioneer work there until...

Biography of James Duval Holman

James Duval Holman was born in August 18, 1814, on his father’s farm in Woodford county, Kentucky. He was of the Holman family so well known in the Southern and Middle States. His mother was a Duval of Hugenot descent, a family of equal position with the Holmans in the south. Of Mr. Holman’s great-grand parents, three came from Virginia and one from North Carolina. His parents were John and Betsy L. Holman, who were married in October, 1810. In 1817 they moved to Tennessee, where they resided for nine years, when they moved to Clay county, Missouri. His mother died in 1841, and his father came to Oregon in the immigration of 1843. In August, 1840, James D. Holman married Rachael Hixson Summers of Fleming county, Kentucky, who survives him, and now (1890), is living at Portland. Her family is well known, particularly in Kentucky, and is closely related to the Hixson, Mason and Morris families of that State. She was born February 27, 1823, in Fleming county, Kentucky, and in 1840 accompanied her father, Thomas Summers, on a trip to Western Missouri, which he took for his health. While there she met Mr. Holman. Soon after he reached manhood Mr. Holman engaged in mercantile business. During that period the large number of Mormons in this section of Missouri caused great trouble, and partly by reason of his opposition to them and the active measures against them, in which he was a participant, he failed in business in 1845. His failure, too, was caused in part by the bankruptcy of a large number of his debtors. He refused...
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