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Biography of Richard Allen

Richard Allen had been professor of history in the Montgomery County High School since the organization of that excellent institution more than fifteen years ago. He is one of the most widely known educators in Southern Kansas. His Allen ancestors came originally from England, one branch settling in Massachusetts and the other in Virginia during colonial days. His grandfather, William Allen, was born in Virginia in 1780, and some years later the family moved across the mountains into Kentucky, and subsequently became early settlers in Illinois. William Allen died in White County, Illinois, in 1845. Richard Allen was born in Logan County, Illinois, December 7, 1864. His father, B. F. Allen, was born in White County of that state in 1833, and was one of the Kansas pioneers, Reared in Illinois, and taking up the vocation of farmer there he first came out to Kansas in 1859, when it was still a territory. He spent some time near Augusta in Butler County, being there when the population was almost completely composed of Indians and before the homestead act was passed. He afterwards returned to Illinois, and served as a soldier in the Civil war, but after four months was incapacitated being taken ill with cholera and his life was despaired of for some time. After the war he followed farming in Logan County, Illinois, but in 1871 emigrated across the country in a prairie schooner and established his home and family at Elk City, where he bought his farm of 240 acres. He retired from farming about 1896, and afterwards sold the old place. His death occurred in Elk...

Biography of Christopher Columbus Michal

C. C. Michal, for the past fifteen years, had been one of the extensive contractors in Southern Kansas, though his work had been done in various parts of the state. His home and headquarters are at Independence, where he is recognized as one of the substantial citizens. Mr. Michal went to the border with the Kansas National Guards, Company K, Second Infantry, as a sergeant and served three months. His ancestors came originally from Ireland and were early settlers in the United States. They located very early in the nineteenth century in Western Indiana near Terre Hante, where Philip Michal, father of the Independence contractor, was born in 1828. Philip Michal was reared and married in Indiana and lived there as a farmer for many years. From that state he enlisted in 1861 as a member of the Twenty-ninth Indiana Infantry, and was in service until the close of the war. In one engagement he was wounded by a burating shell and never fully recovered from his wounds. However, he participated in some of the greatest battles and campaigns of the war, including Shiloh, Vicksburg, the march to the sea with Sherman, and all the battles of that campaign. Once he was taken prisoner and confined in the notorious Andersonville until exchanged. He was mustered out with the rauk of first sergeant. Some years after the war he left his Indiana farm and in 1882 moved to Cherryvale, Kansas, where he was an early settler and where he continued farming and stock raising until his death in 1896. He was a republican and was honored with various township offices....

Biography of Michael Dougherty

Michael Dougherty is one of the able industrious workers and business men who have identified themselves with the City of Independence because it is a center for the oil and gas industry of the Southwest. For forty years he had been a boilermaker, and had followed his trade as a workman and as a contractor in nearly all the oil and gas fields in the country. He is now superintendent of tankage construction for the Prairie Oil and Gas Company. He is a native of Ireland and of an old County Donegal family. His grandfather spent his life as a farmer in County Donegal. Michsel Dougherty was born in that county March 16, 1860. His father James Dougherty, who was born there in 1834, was for some years engaged in the stock trading business between Ireland and England. In 1868, leaving his family in Ireland, he came to America and settled near Wilkesbarre, Pennsylvanis. Here he became foreman in railroad construction, and he died near Wilkesbarre, in 1889. After becoming an American citizan he voted the democratie ticket, and was a member of the Catholic Church. James Dougherty married Eunice Moye, who was born in County Donegal in 1834 and died there in 1873. She was the mother of six childrcn: Mary is the wife of James McAdams, a stationary engineer living at Chicago, Illinois; the second is Michael; Barney is a boilermaker at Chicago; Edward is a structural iron worker and his whereabouts have been unknown to his family for the past four years. James is a miner living at Plymouth, Pennsylvania. Michael Dougherty received all his education...

Biography of Mrs. George Thacher Guernsey

Her character, her intellectual attainments, her philanthropy and her prominent association with large movements make Mrs. George T. Guernsey of Independence one of the great women of Kansas. She had lived in Independence since 1879, and was first known in that city as a teacher in the high school. Her husband is one of the most successful and prominent bankers of Kansas, and the possession of ample means had enabled her to satisfy her cultivated tastes in the way of books, travel, art and literature, and her energy had impelled her to a position of leadership in the larger woman’s movements. In 1915 Mrs. Guernsey was candidate for the high office of president general of the national society Daughters of the American Revolution. That candidacy places her in a favorable position for election to that distinguished honor in 1917. Her name had thus become prominently known outside of her home state, and much had been written and said concerning this brilliant Kansas woman. The state recording secretary, Daughters of the American Revolution, of Kansas, thus writes: “Mrs. George Thacher Guernsey of Independence had been chosen by many of the most thoughtful and earnest women of the Society as their candidate for the high office of President General, and in her they feel that the organization will have a leader of high efficiency. “Mrs. Guernsey as state regent of Kansas, had been a member of the National Board of management for nine years and had been a faithful attendant at its meetings. Well versed in the work of the National Society, her knowledge will be of great value should she...

Biography of John F. Overfield

During his service in the Kansas Legislature as a senator from Montgomery County it had been the enviable distinction of John F. Overfield to have become one of the leading members in influence and aetivity of the State Senate. It is said that he had never introduced a bill in behalf of his constituents that had not secured the approval of both houses and hecome a law. Politically Senator Overfield is a republican of the old school, and is by no means ashamed of the description stand-pat republican. He was elected to the State Senate in 1908, and had served through the sessions of 1909, 1911, 1913 and 1915. During his first term he was chairman of the oil and gas committee, and was a member of the committees on mines and mining, eities of second and third class, railroad corporations, telegraph and telephones, federal and state affairs, irrigation and drainage. During the sessions of 1913-15 he was again chairman of the oil and gas committees and a member of the committees on assessments and taxation, cities of second class, mines and mining, municipal corporations. A native of Kansas and a son of a territorial settler, Senator Overfield had spent his active career in Montgomery County, and during the last twenty years had become one of the leading oil and gas operators in the state. He was born at lawrence, Kansas. His father, Thomas Overfield, was born in Birmingham, England, in 1825, came to this country at the age of twenty-five, and for a time was in the patent leather business at Salem, Massachusetts. In 1852 he went out...

Biography of La Rue Royce

La Rue Royce, who recently began practice of his profession as a lawyer at Salina, represents one of the distinguished names of Kansas. He is a son of John Quincy Royce of Topeka, long prominent as a lawyer, editor and a dominating character in republican politics in this state. John Quiney Royce was born on a farm in Fayette County, Iowa, June 1, 1856, a son of David P. Royce, who was a native of New York State. When nine years of age John Quincy Royce was taken from the farm in his native Iowa county to Independence in that state, and in that city he grew up. He attended the public schools, graduating from the Independence High School at the age of eighteen. For two years he studied law at West Union, Iowa, and on completing his studies was admitted to the bar at Independence in April, 1879. Casting his eye over the country for a suitable location, he arrived in June of the same year at Smith Center, Kansas. In that comparatively new country he rapidly built up a reputation as an able young lawyer, and was in active practice until January, 1885. From that date until January, 1887, he served as county attorney in Smith County. On leasing office he changed his profession to a journalist, and for more than twenty years was one of the foremost writers and editors of the state. He was editor and proprietor of the Smith Center Bulletin for several years and by the purchase of the Smith Center Pioneer he consolidated the two papers making what is still known as...

Biography of Harry Newton Duckworth

Harry Newton Duckworth. On the proved basis of his worth Harry N. Duckworth is one of the leading building contractors of Independence. When a young man he started out to learn the carpenter’s trade, and had been in the contracting business for a number of years, not only at Independence, but elsewhere in Kansas and in other states. Some of the finest residences in Kansas have been put up under his direction and through the organization and facilities which he had assembled. Mr. Duckworth is a native Kansan and was born on a farm 2 1/2 miles south of Howard in Elk County, March 22, 1877. His family is one that in the different generations had played its worthy part in several states. The Duckworths originally came from England and settled in Virginis in colonial times. His grandfather, Albert K. Duckworth, was a native of Indiana, and moved to Iowa soon after the territory was admitted to the Union, and was one of the pioneers of Davis County, where he had a farm and where he also served as a county official. O. L. Duckworth, father of Harry N., was born in 1841, near Greencastle, Indiana, and was about nine years of age when his parents moved out to Davis County, Iowa, where he was reared and where he married in 1864. He spent his life as a mechanic and farmer, and in 1870 went to Elk County, Kansas, and was one of those who took up homesteads in that new district. His quarter section was located 2½ miles south of Howard, and he afterwards retired from the farm...

Biography of Walter L. McVey

Walter L. McVey is one of the able young members of the Independence bar, and had enjoyed extensive relations with the profession in Montgomery County for the past eight years. Though a native of Illinois, his life had been spent largely in this part of Southern Kansas. He was born at Marshall, Illinois, September 11, 1880. His father, William H. McVey, was born in the same state in 1833, and died in Independence, Kansas, in 1891. He was reared and married in Illinois and in 1883 moved to Montgomery County, Kansas. He devoted his life to the service of the Methodist Episcopal Church as a minister, and on being superannuated retired to his farm in Montgomery County, Kansas, in 1883. He was a republican. The maiden name of his wife was Samantha J. Flemming, who was born in Shelbyville, Illinois, in 1840 and now resided at Independence, Kansas. Their children were: Emma, deceased wife of J. L. Kuhl, who is a merchant at Beardstown, Illinois; Mary F., a teacher of music and living at home with her mother; June, now deceased, whose husband, R. L. Webb, as a farmer in Jasper County, Missouri; George W., a railway mail clerk, who died at Independence, Kansas; Stella, wife of A. C. Sewell, employed by the Baden Mercantile Company at Independence; and Walter L. A cousin of the Independence attorney is Dr. R. Ed MeVey of Topeka. Reared on a farm in Montgomery County and attending the country schools there, Walter L. McVey was graduated from the county high school in 1902, following which he took two years of collegiate work in...

Biographical Sketch of William E. Stich

William E. Stich. The largest general insurance office in Independence is owned and managed by William E. Stich. Mr. Stich is a brother of the late A. C. Stich, whose career as a business man and eitizen of Montgomery County had been described on other pages, where many of the detalls of the family history will be found. William E. Stich was born in Hanover, Germany, February 16, 1850. His parents came to this country in 1857 and located at Kalamazoo, Michigan. His early education was received in the schools there, and in the meantime he learned to be a cabinet maker under his father, who was a master of that trade. At the age of seventeen, on leaving school, he began working in an organ factory, and remained there about six years. He then became connected with the musical merchandise house of R. D. Bulloch of Jackson, Michigan, and was manager of their store at Saginaw for nine years. In 1883 Mr. Stich came to Kansas and bought his brother’s interest in a store at Paola. This was a general merchandise store and as its proprietor he conducted it for twenty-one years. Then in 1904 he moved to Ottawa, Kansas, and for a year was in the ice business. After a year’s intermission, he came to Independence in 1906, and had since been in the insurance business. His offices are at 204 1/2 North Penn Avenue. He is also a stockholder in the Exchange National Bank of Tulsa, Oklahoma. Mr., Stich had a comfortable home at 508 Maple Street. He is a member and former trustee of the...

Biography of George E. Weaver

George E. Weaver. One of the most important offices in a municipality is that of city engineer. The permanence, the efficiency, the economy of operation of practically every public improvement and public convenience depends upon the skill exercised by the engineer in planning and supervising the construction of such improvements. That had been the work of George E. Weaver at Independence, who is now serving his second term as city engineer. In the past three years the city had undertaken an exceptionally heavy amount of paving, sewer construction and other forms of improvement, and the citizens give Mr. Weaver great credit for the able manner in which this work had been carried out. He comes of a family whose members have been usually devoted to some mechanical trade or profession. The Weavers originally came from Germany and settled in Pennsylvania, in colonial times, and the grandfather, also named George E. Weaver, was born in Pennsylvania in 1830, became an early settler in Ohio and the locality known as Weaver Station was established on his farm and was named in his honor. He died in Ohio at Greenville in 1912. It was at Weaver Station, Ohio, that the city engineer of Independence was born November 29, 1879. His father, P. D. Weaver, born at Weaver Station in 1858, spent his life in that locality as a carpenter and builder, and died at Greenville February 7, 1916. He was an active republican. He married Miss Jennie Brown, who was born near Greenville, Ohio, in 1860 and died there in January, 1915. Her family also came from Germany in the early days...
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