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Biography of Charles B. Grigsby

CHARLES B. GRIGSBY. One of the old and prominent citizens of Stone County, Arkansas, is Charles B. Grigsby, who has labored for the good of this section for many years, although a native of Monroe County, East Tennessee; he was born in 182S, to James and Margaret (Houston) Grigsby, who were born in the Old Dominion. They were married in Blount County, Tennessee, and made their home there and in Loudon Counties until 1850, when they came to Arkansas, locating in Independence County, eight miles above Batesville and two miles from the White River. While residing in Tennessee, the father held the office of constable for twenty-four years, and he also became one of the substantial citizens of Independence County, Arkansas He was a Whig in politics and at the time of his death was about sixty-one years of age, while his wife attained the age of eighty-five years. Her grandfather reared Gen. Sam Houston, who afterward became so well known in the history of Tennessee and Texas. To the marriage of Mr. and Mrs. Grigsby eight children were born, of whom the subject of this sketch was the fifth. Charles attended school in Monroe County, Tennessee, and there made his home until 1848, when he came to Arkansas and located in Independence County, in the Barrens, nine miles west of Batesville, where he rented land for a time, then entered a forty-acre tract five miles west of where he then lived. After residing there a few years he bought land in the southern part of the county, and fifty acres in the bottom, on which he erected a...

Biography of L. T. Cornett

L. T. CORNETT. The name of this gentleman is a familiar one through-out Taney County, Missouri, and is synonymous with the merchandising and farming interests of his section. Since 1876 he has resided in Taney County, and during that period has kept his escutcheon untarnished. Like other representative men of the county, he came originally from Searcy County, Arkansas, his birth occurring on the 27th of November, 1854, comes of good old Virginia stock. His parents, Henry and Malinda (Yowell) Cornett, were natives of Virginia and Tennessee, respectively, the former born in the year 1813. The father moved from his native State to Tennessee, and in 1849 settled in Searcy County, Arkansas, where he resided for a number of years. Thence he moved to Independence County, Arkansas, and cultivated the soil there with unusual success until his death in 1861. He was a prominent and useful citizen and a stanch Democrat in his political views. His brother John was a soldier in the War of 1812. The name Cornett is of English origin and the first members of this family to come to America settled in the grand old Mother of States, Virginia. The mother of our subject died in 1860. Eleven children were born to her union, six of whom lived to an adult age, and five are now living: Tennessee, deceased; James G. is a physician in Arkansas; Henry M. resides at Harrison, Arkansas; Joseph A., in the West; Martha, wife of W. R. Ellison, of Taney, and the others died in early life. L. T. Cornett was reared in Independence County, Arkansas, and his scholastic training...

Biographical Sketch of William Kelly Morgan

William Kelly Morgan, engaged in the monument business in Muskogee, was born in Independence county, Arkansas, on the 2d of September, 1874. Having completed his public school education he devoted his attention to farming until 1908, manifesting at all times that spirit of industry which has characterized him in his later commercial pursuits. He brought his land under a high state of cultivation and carried on the work of the farm until 1908, when he became engaged in general merchandising at Colegate, Oklahoma, where he remained for two and a half years. On the expiration of that period he turned his attention to the marble and granite business as a monument maker and in 1919 he came to Muskogee, where he has since carried on business under his own name, having his establishment at No. 217 South Cherokee street. Here he employs four men and is enjoying a good patronage, which is steadily growing by reason of the value and attractiveness of the work turned out. He has been the maker of some of the finest monuments seen in this section and his business is steadily growing. In 1901 Mr. Morgan was united in marriage to Miss Stella Plummer, a granddaughter of Joseph R. Plummer, whose quarter strain of Indian blood makes him a prominent representative of the Choctaw Nation. Mr. and Mrs. Morgan have an interesting family of six children: Reginald, Beatrice, William K., Jr., Gilmer, Lorene and Woodrow Wilson. The parents are members of the First Methodist Episcopal Church, South, and Mr. Morgan is serving on the board of stewards. They take an active interest in the...

Biography of W. W. Powell

For the past two years W. W. Powell has been city attorney of Pryor. He ranks high among the prominent lawyers of the Oklahoma bar and he has built up a large and distinctively representative clientage. He has concentrated his time, energies and attention upon his professional duties and the work that he has done as advocate and counselor indicates clearly his familiarity with the principles of jurisprudence and an analytical power that enables him to correctly apply those principles to the question under consideration. He was born in Black Jack Hill, Arkansas, on the 31st of December, 1865, a son of Richard H. and Jane (Temple) Powell. Mr. Powell was a prominent and representative member of the legal profession and was a lawyer and circuit judge for thirty years. He also served a brief term on the supreme bench of Arkansas. The demise of the father occurred at Fort Smith in 1917. Mrs. Powell passed away in 1869. Three sons and three daughters were born to their union of whom W. W. Powell was the youngest. W. W. Powell received his early education in the public and private schools of Arkansas and later enrolled in the State University of Arkansas, from which institution he was graduated with the A. B. degree in 1888. He immediately started in to practice his profession and located at Greenwood, Arkansas, where he remained until 1892. In that year he went to Washington, D. C., as private secretary to Congressman Neill of the Sixth district of Arkansas, and he was active in that position for two years. At the termination of that time...

Independence County, Arkansas Census

Independence County, Arkansas was formed from Arkansas and Lawrence counties in 1820. 1830 Independence County, Arkansas Census Free 1830 Census Form for your Research Hosted at Ancestry.com – Ancestry Free Trial 1830 Independence County, Census (images and index) $ 1810-1890 Accelerated Indexing Systems Free 1830 Census Index Free 1830 Census Transcription Hosted at Census Guide 1830 U.S. Census Guide 1840 Independence County, Arkansas Census Free 1840 Census Form for your Research Hosted at Ancestry.com – Ancestry Free Trial 1840 Independence County, Census (images and index) $ 1810-1890 Accelerated Indexing Systems Free 1840 Census Index Hosted at Census Guide 1840 U.S. Census Guide 1850 Independence County, Arkansas Census Free 1850 Census Form for your Research Free 1850 Census Images (partially indexed) Hosted at Ancestry.com – Ancestry Free Trial 1850 Independence County, Census (images and index) $ 1810-1890 Accelerated Indexing Systems Free 1850 Census Index Surnames: A-D Surnames: E-J Surnames: K-P Surnames: Q-Z Free 1850 Census Transcription pg 312-323 pg 324-348 pg 349-374 pg 375-376 pg 336b-361a pg 361b-374b Hosted at Census Guide 1850 U.S. Census Guide 1860 Independence County, Arkansas Census Free 1860 Census Form for your Research Free 1860 Census Images and Index Hosted at Ancestry.com – Ancestry Free Trial 1860 Independence County, Census (images and index) $ 1810-1890 Accelerated Indexing Systems Hosted at Census Guide 1860 U.S. Census Guide 1870 Independence County, Arkansas Census Free 1870 Census Form for your Research Free 1870 Census Images and Index Hosted at Ancestry.com – Ancestry Free Trial 1870 Independence County, Census (images and index) $ 1810-1890 Accelerated Indexing Systems Hosted at Census Guide 1870 U.S. Census Guide 1880 Independence County, Arkansas...

Independence County, Arkansas Cemetery Records

Most of these cemetery listings are complete indices at the time of transcription, however, in some cases we list the listing when it is only a partial listing. Following Cemeteries (hosted at Independence County Arkansas USGenWeb Archives) Jamestown Cemetery Union Grove Cemetery Wackerly Family Cemetery Following Cemeteries (hosted at Independence County Arkansas Tombstone Transcription Project) Akron Cemetery Alderbrook Cemetery Allen Chapel Cemetery Barnes Cemetery Blue Springs Cemetery Buck Cemetery Campground Cemetery Cedar Grove Cemetery Dugger Cemetery Edwards Cemetery Hickory Valley Cemetery Hindman Cemetery Holcombe Cemetery Hopewell Cemetery Jamestown Cemetery Lee’s Chapel Cemetery (Moorefield) Lee’s Chapel Cemetery (Sandtown) , Partial Lee’s Chapel Cemetery (Sandtown) , Complete Liberty Cemetery Lone Beech(Beach) Cemetery Macedonia Cemetery Mac’s Chapel Cemetery McNutt Cemetery Mt. Zion Cemetery (Newark) Mt. Zion Cemetery (Batesville) Oaklawn Cemetery A-B Surname C-Eu Surname Ev-Hen Surname Her-K Surname L-Mis Surname Mit-Ric Surname Ric-Sur Surname Swafford-YostSurname You-Z Surname You-Z Pioneer Cemetery Pleasant Hill Cemetery Rehobeth Cemetery Roselawn Memorial Gardens Sulphur Rock Cemetery Thornsberry A. Gray Cemetery Union Grove Cemetery Wackerly Family Cemetery Walnut Grove Cemetery Various Independence County Cemeteries Following Cemeteries hosted at Tales of Old, Out on a Limb Genealogy Ball Cemetery Barnett Cemetery Bethel Cemetery Cedar Grove Cemetery Center Grove Cemetery Convenience Cemetery Dorr Cemetery Gray’s Chapel Cemetery Haddock Cemetery Harvison Cemetery Hickory Valley Cemetery James Cemetery Lee’s Chapel Liberty Cemetery Mack Cemetery McDonald Cemetery McKinney Family Cemetery Meacham Family Cemetery Oaklawn Cemetery Pleasant Hill Cemetery Rawlings Cemetery Rehobeth Cemetery Stark Cemetery Walnut Grove Cemetery Ward Family Cemetery Weaver’s Chapel Cemetery Wood Cemetery Young Cemetery  ...

Biographical Sketch of Jeremiah C. Cravens

This gentleman was born in Saline county, Missouri, February 18th, 1838. He is a son of Dr. John Cravens, who for many years was the peer of the finest physicians and surgeons of the State. They are of Virginia ancestry, Jeremiah’s grandfather, Dr. Joseph Cravens, being for many years a leading physician of Rockingham county, Virginia. Jeremiah C. graduated from the Missouri State University in the class of 1860, taking the degree of Bachelor of Arts. The civil war breaking out soon after leaving school, he cast his lot with the fortunes of the Confederacy, and followed its flag until its brilliant star set forever at Appomattox. He was promoted by Gen. Slack to the position of aid-de-camp, to rank as lieutenentcolonel. He was at the battle of Pea Ridge, in March, 1862, by the side of General Slack, when that gentleman fell mortally wounded. After the battle he went with the army to Corinth, Mississippi, and shortly after the evacuation of that place, he returned to Missouri, with Col. Hughes, and participated in the battles of Independence and Lone Jack. At the last named engagement, Lieut. Colonel Cravens commanded a company of recruits who fought desperately upon that sanguinary field. After the battle he was chosen captain and served with his company in the 6th Missouri Cavalry, under Generals Marmaduke and Shelby, until the war closed. He then began the study of the law and was licensed to the practice at Batesville, Arkansas, in 1866. In 1868, he came to Springfield, where he has since resided, and ranks with the best legal talent in the State. He is,...
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