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Coulter, James – Obituary

La Grande, Union County, Oregon James Coulter, several years a citizen of Elgin, but of late years a resident of La Grande, died in that city August 31, 1945, aged 86 years and 21 days. Although his health had been generally failing, due to his advanced years, his final illness was of short duration. Graveside services were conducted at the Elgin cemetery at 2:30 Tuesday afternoon, and entombment followed immediately thereafter. Only two direct relatives survive deceased. They are two sons: F. L., of Sisters, Ore., and Jas. J., of Joseph. James Coulter was born at Mulkeytown, Ill., August 12, 1859. He came with his family to Walla Walla valley in 1896, residing there 3 years, then moved to Joseph in 1899. He moved to Elgin in 1913, residing here several years. He had resided in La Grande the past 4 years. The Recorder September 6, 1945 Contributed by: Larry...

Biography of John Milligan Johnson

John Milligan Johnson. Recently there died at Manhattan a Kansan whose character was even more important than his material achievements. He came within four years of living a century and he was a figure in the activities of the frontier until the frontier had passed away. But more important than all his experiences were the moral forces that emanated from his life, and the things he stood for, believed in, and worked to bring about. It is therefore as a character sketch that the following paragraphs are offered, and they find an appropriate place in the history of Kansas. John Milligan Johnson was born at Pickneyville, Perry County, Illinois, January 29, 1820. His grandfather was a companion of Daniel Boone in his adventures through the western wilderness. His parents were natives of Kentucky and sometime prior to 1832 they moved to Northern Illinois, settling in the vicinity of Rock Island. When the Black Hawk war came on in 1832 they were still living there. This gave the boy an opportunity to see this small war with the Indians. To the end of his life he remembered many incidents of those stirring times. Having a keen sense of humor, nothing of the ridiculous escaped his attention. He would tell of a certain siege. The people were gathered in a fort. One new recruit was afraid to stand up to the port-hole and take aim at the foe. He would put his gun up to the port and fire at random. He was admonished by an old frontiersman and Indian fighter who said to him: “John, those Indians are not up...

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