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Biography of Rev. James T. Dougherty

When De Nonville and his French army, in 1687, destroyed the Indian village of Gannagaro and Gaudougarae, the inhabitants were driven eastward and formed a village near the foot of Canandaigua Lake, which village and lake have since then borne that name. Among the Indian inhabitants in those days were many Catholics, some of them Senecas and most of them Hurons and Algonquin captives, the result of fifty years of missionary labor of the zealous Jesuits. Even in our day the beads and crucifixes given the Indians by the missionaries are still picked up on the sites of the old Indian towns. Following the revolution and the white settlement of western New York, Canandaigua became a prominent center of commerce and government, and no doubt many Catholics were among the pioneers. The family of Hugh Collins came as early as 1823, others followed, and there are traditions of lumber wagons leaving here Saturday afternoons to bring the people to the Sunday mass at St. Patrick’s in Rochester. About 1840 Rev. Bernard O’Reilly, of Rochester, said the first mass in Canandaigua in the Patrick Doyle house on Antis street. Mass was celebrated in various homes for the following few years. At length, in 1844, a lot was purchased by Father O’Reilly from Thomas Beals, and in the fall of 1846 the pew books give the following list of pewholders. On the south side of the church: Bernard Scandling, Bridget Garvey, Hugh Collins, Patrick White, Patrick Doyle, Michael Coyle, Catherine Hanavin, Agnes King, John Whalen, William Lysaght, Eleanor Gannon, James Ryan, Patrick Sherry, Matthew- Carroll, Hugh Keefe, James Gleason, James Cooney,...

Biography of Fred M. Locke

(VIII) Fred M., son of William Morton Locke, was born at West Mendon, in the village of Honeoye Falls, April 24, 1861. He attended the common schools. He learned the art of telegraphing and followed it from 1880 to 1887. In 1887 he was station agent and telegraph operator for the New York Central railroad. He was a skillful mechanic. with a tendency to invention, even in his youth. He was something of an artist and spent much time in painting. To eke out his income he used to make flies for the fishermen and was himself an expert angler. He was so much more fortunate than the others in winning prizes in the fishing contests in which he took part in Canandaigua, that he was finally ruled out altogether. His invention for improving the pin in electric insulators was laughed at when he first showed it and he lost the profit from it, another man, who appropriated the idea and patented it, reaping the reward that belonged to him. Naturally he came to study electricity while a telegraph operator, and he spent much of his spare hours in experiments. He constructed a dynamo of his own invention, and it was used for furnishing electric lights in a mill in the vicinity. In the telegraph office he had often noticed the defects of the insulators during storms and he undertook to find a method of overcoming them. He sought a new form and material that would not allow the leakage caused by wetness of the insulators and poles and he discovered a mixture of clay and other substances producing...

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