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Slave Narrative of Lizzie Johnson

Interviewer: Irene Robertson Person Interviewed: Lizzie Johnson Location: Biscoe, Arkansas Place of Birth: Holly Springs, Mississippi Age: 65 Federal Writers’ Project of the W.P.A. District #6 Marion County Anna Pritchett 1200 Kentucky Avenue FOLKLORE MRS. LIZZIE JOHNSON 706 North Senate Avenue, Apt. 1 Mrs. Johnson’s father, Arthur Locklear, was born in Wilmington, N.C. in 1822. He lived in the South and endured many hardships until 1852. He was very fortunate in having a white man befriend him in many ways. This man taught him to read and write. Many nights after a hard days work, he would lie on the floor in front of the fireplace, trying to study by the light from the blazing wood, so he might improve his reading and writing. He married very young, and as his family increased, he became ambitious for them. Knowing their future would be very dark if they remained South. He then started a movement to come north. There were about twenty-six or twenty-eight men and women, who had the same thoughts about their children, banded together, and in 1852 they started for somewhere, North. The people selected, had to be loyal to the cause of their children’s future lives, morally clean, truthful, and hard-working. Some had oxen, some had carts. They pooled all of their scant belongings, and started on their long hard journey. The women and children rode in the ox-carts, the men walked. They would travel a few days, then stop on the roadside to rest. The women would wash their few clothes, cook enough food to last a few days more, then they would start out...

Biography of G. B. Glover

The stock men of Malheur County are the men who have brought the County to the front by their arduous labors and wise manipulation of the resources here found, and as a prominent one of this distinguished class the subject of this article is well known, being also a worthy pioneer, who wrought here with a firm hand and endured the hardships incident to that life, while his keen foresight and enterprise led him to see the value of the country that he was opening. Mr. Glover was born in Holly Springs, Mississippi on December 20, 1841, and at the age of fourteen went with his father and the balance of the family to Arkansas, where he remained until the breaking out of the terrible Civil war and then enlisted in the Confederate army, doing valiant military service until the close of the conflict. He then returned to his home, and in 1870 came to Jackson County, Missouri and thence, five years later, he journeyed to what is now Malheur County. He located where he now lives, eighteen miles northwest from Jordan valley, at Cow Creek lakes, took land and engaged in farming and stock-raising. Success has attended his thrifty and wisely bestowed labors and he now has a valuable estate of eleven hundred and forty acres of land. “The Lakes.” as the estate is called, is one of the most beautiful, as well as valuable, in southeastern Oregon. He has it well improved. and it is made a comfortable and attractive rural abode. Mr. Glover has one hundred and fifty cattle and other stock. He is always active...

Biography of Jackson Johnson

Jackson Johnson of St. Louis, who as chairman of the board of the International Shoe Company has gained not only American but world leadership in connection with shoe manufacturing interests, was born in La Grange, Alabama, on the 2d of November, 1859, a son of James Lee and Helen (Rand) Johnson, the former a native of Mississippi, while the latter was born in Alabama. The father owned and conducted a plantation up to the time of the Civil war. Jackson Johnson pursued his education in the public schools of his native state and when nineteen years of age initiated his business career by becoming identified with a general merchandise establishment at Holly Springs, Mississippi, where he conducted business until 1892. He then disposed of his store and in the following year removed to Memphis, Tennessee, where he was active in organizing the Johnson, Carruthers & Rand Company, a business concern of which he remained the president for five years. On selling out he removed to St. Louis in March, 1898, and was active in organizing the Roberts, Johnson & Rand Shoe Company, manufacturers of shoes. He became president of this organization and so continued until the 29th of December, 1911, when the Roberts, Johnson & Rand Shoe Company was merged with the Peters Shoe Company, the new organization being incorporated under the name of the International Shoe Company, of which Mr. Johnson served as the president until 1915, when he became chairman of the board. This corporation controls the largest shoe manufacturing trade of the world and covers all branches of the industry. In May, 1921, they absorbed the...

Biography of Captain Nelson Green Gill

Captain Nelson Green Gill, Post-master of San Bernardino, came to California from Toulon, Illinois, in March 1849, with a team composed of four oxen and two cows. He came by way of St. Joseph, Fort Laramie, Fort Hall and Lassen’s cut-off, with a train composed of twenty-two wagons. They brought with them a ferryboat, which they used in crossing the North Platte and Green rivers, afterward selling it for $100. They arrived in Sacramento valley, September 26, 1849. Leaving his ox teams at Bidwell’s ranch, Captain Gill started for the mines on Feather River. After he had been in the mines a few months, provisions ran short, and he and a fellow miner started with their oxen and wagon for Sacramento to lay in a supply. The Sacramento River was swollen to a flood, and, becoming involved in the flood, they lost their wagon and oxen, and Mr. Gill’s companion lost his life. Three months elapsed before Mr. Gill got back to camp; he had lost everything he started with, including $600 in gold. Not being successful at mining and being troubled with scurvy, as were many others, he, accompanied by a mining companion, started for Los Angeles, walking to Marysville on foot. They took a rowboat to Sacramento, thence, by steamer, to San Francisco; then, not having money enough to buy two tickets, they walked all the way, 500 miles, to Los Angeles, arriving in November 1850. He and his friend rented twenty acres of land about twenty miles from Los Angeles, from John Reed, sowed ten acres of it to wheat and ten to barley during the...

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