Discover your family's story.

Enter a grandparent's name to get started.

Start Now

Biography of John Evans Robertson

John Evans Robertson, a wellknown ice dealer of Concord, was born May 9, 1843, in Warner, N.H., son of Harrison D. and Sarah C. (Evans) Robertson, both of Warner. The families of both parents were old residents of Merrimack County, New Hampshire. The maternal ancestors originally came from Newburyport, Mass., where Grandfather Benjamin Evans officiated as Sheriff, being also a prominent business man. John E. Robertson attended the public schools of Warner, and subsequently fitted for college in the academy at Henniker, N.H. However, after leaving school at the age of eighteen, he did not go to college. In 1864 he went to Montreal, and there engaged in the produce business, under the firm name of Buck, Robertson & Co. Six years later, on account of ill health, he returned to Warner, where he conducted a country store until 1874, when he came to Concord. Here he was assistant cashier of the National Savings Bank for eight years. Beginning in 1882 he dealt in coal, wood, and ice until 1888, when he sold out on account of failing health. Three years later he resumed the ice business, which he still carries on. He is a trustee and the assistant treasurer of the National Savings Bank. When the institution went into liquidation in 1877, he was appointed assignee by the court. He is also a trustee of the Guarantee Savings Bank of Concord. In Bradford, N.H., August 15, 1864, Mr. Robertson was married to Martha F. Paige, of Montreal. Of their three children two are living, namely: Shirlie Louise, the wife of William A. Whitney, of Claremont, N.H.; and Carleton...

Biography of Newell H. Webster

Newell H. Webster, now a prominent and affluent resident of Helena, Mont., was born November 29, 1836, in Henniker, a son of Jesse and Susan C. (Newell) Webster. An account of his Newell was known as a remarkably bright lad, showing even then the vigor of intellect and strength of character inherited from his mother. After leaving school he learned the tailor’s trade from his father, subsequently spending two years as a clerk in Boston. His health failing, a change of climate was advised; and, little thinking what the future years had in store for him, he bade farewell to his friends, and started westward, arriving in Minnesota early in 1861. At Hastings he joined a party engaged in surveying for a railway, being employed as chain carrier. His investigating turn of mind and natural desire for knowledge caused him to note the transit’s record in a book of his own. Soon after he became expert in the use of the instruments, whereupon the engineer in charge placed him in charge of the transit. When the surveying in that State was completed, he received and accepted a flattering offer of an engagement in the same line of business in Colorado, where he went in 1863. He was subsequently selected to lead an exploring party into Idaho and Montana; and he was at East Bannack, Montana Territory, when the settlement of the district was beginning. Deciding at once to locate in the new and undeveloped region, Mr. Webster identified himself with its interests. Eventually he established himself in business in the future city of Helena, where he erected the first...

Biography of Leonard Wood Peabody, M.D.

Leonard Wood Peabody, M.D., of Henniker, one of the oldest medical practitioners in Merrimack County, was born in Newport, Sullivan County, September 13, 1817, son of Ami and Sarah (Johnson) Peabody. He is a descendant of Francis Peabody, who, born in England in 1614, came to New England on board the ship “Planter” in 1635. This ancestor, after residing in Ipswich, Mass., for a while, removed to Hampton in 1638, and in 1651 settled in Topsfield, Mass. From him the line of descent comes through Captain John Peabody, who was born in 1642, Ensign David Peabody, born in 1678, John Peabody, born in 1714, to Jedediah Peabody, born in 1743, who was the grandfather of Leonard W. Jedediah served in the Revolutionary War, and participated in the battle of Bunker Hill. In 1781 he moved his family from Boxford, Mass., to Warner, N.H., where he resided for many years. The maiden name of his wife was Alice Howlet; and their last days were spent in East Lebanon, N.H., where they died at an advanced age. Their children were: Ami, Lydia M., Mary, Moses, Susannah, Thomas, Alice, Andrew, Frederick, Betsey, and John. Of these, one, Alice, who married Eleazar Whitney, remained in Merrimack County. Ami Peabody, born in Boxford, Mass., in 1769, was twelve years old when his parents moved to New Hampshire. When a young man he settled in Newport, N.H.; and his death occurred in that town, January 27, 1845. The first of his two marriages was contracted in Henniker with Patty Rice. She had two children, namely: Lucy, who married Leonard Wood, of this town; and Martha,...

Biography of Charles H. Courser

Charles H. Courser, a retired business man of Henniker, was born in Boscawen, now Webster, N.H., May 19, 1827, son of John and Keziah (Shepard) Courser. The first ancestors of the family were English. His grandfather, John Courser, was a resident of Merrimack County. The father passed the greater part of his life in Boscawen, and died there at the age of ninety-two years. The mother, who was a daughter of John Shepard, a native of Derry, N.H., lived to be eighty-two. Of her children the only survivor is Charles H. Charles H. Courser passed his boyhood in attending school and assisting upon the farm. When about seventeen years old he was apprenticed to the trade of carpenter and millwright. After serving for three years he was employed as a journeyman carpenter and millwright in Boscawen. In 1853 he came to Henniker, and, securing the site of an old privilege, erected a saw and grist mill, and conducted them for fourteen years. He then sold them, and erected in Newport, N.H., another mill, which he sold before it was completed. Soon after, in Pittsfield, N.H., he bought a mill which he rebuilt and operated for nine years, but still resided in Henniker. When his former mill in this town was subsequently offered for sale, he and his son, Fitz H. Courser, bought the property, built a saw-mill upon the opposite side of the river, on the site of the present shoe factory, and were thereafter engaged in custom grinding and the manufacture of short lumber until the retirement of the father some six years ago. His original mill was...

Biography of David Warren Cogswell

David Warren Cogswell, one of Henniker’s most highly esteemed residents and a prominent Odd Fellow, was born in this town, January 1, 1824, son of David and Hannah (Haskell) Cogswell. His father, who was a son of Joseph Cogswell, was a native of Essex, Mass., born April 25, 1790. David Cogswell learned the blacksmith’s trade with David Choate in his native town, and worked for a time as a journeyman on Cape Ann. He was First Lieutenant of a Gloucester Military Company during the War of 1812, and subsequently received for his services a warrant for one hundred and sixty acres of land. In 1815 he settled in Henniker, where he established a blacksmith shop near the stone bridge; and, as from forty to sixty horses were constantly employed in transporting goods between Boston and Vermont, his shop was for many years a favorite place for horse-shoeing and repairing. 1850, when he sold the shop to his son; and for some years afterward he divided his time between the forge and his farm. In 1820 he erected the house which is now occupied by David W., and he resided in it for nearly fifty years. Being a man of temperate habits, he was strong and vigorous. At his death, on June 30, 1868, which was caused by a cancer in the stomach, he was over seventy-eight years old. On January 3, 1813, he married Hannah Haskell, daughter of Stephen and Anna Haskell, of Essex County, Massachusetts. Among her twelve children were: Colonel Leander Winslow Cogswell, the well-known historian of Henniker; the late Parsons B. Cogswell, formerly editor of the...

Biography of George Cook, M.D.

George Cook, M.D., a prominent physician of Concord, was born at Dover, this State, November 16, 1848, son of Solomon and Susan Ann (Hayes) Cook. His early education was obtained in the Concord High School and in Franklin Academy. In 1865 he began to read medicine with Drs. Charles P. Gage and Granville P. Conn, of Concord. Also he attended a course of lectures on medicine at Burlington, Vt., and two courses at the School of Medicine of Dartmouth College. After graduating from the last-named school in 1869, he immediately began the practice of his profession in Henniker, N.H., where he remained for a year. During the next five years, from 1870 to 1875, he was at Hillsborough, this State, and while there won for himself wide recognition as an able and skilful practitioner. In 1872 he had charge of seventeen cases of small-pox. He was made Superintendent of Schools at Hillsborough in 1874. In May of the following year he came to Concord, where he has since resided. Dr. Cook is a member of the Centre District Medical Society, and in 1882 was its president. He is also a member of the Association of Military Surgeons of the United States, of the American Medical Association, and of the New Hampshire State Medical Society. In 1890 he was senior delegate of the last-named society to Dartmouth College, and delivered an address before the graduating class on “The Physician as an Educator.” During the small-pox epidemic in Montreal in 1885 Dr. Cook was appointed Inspector for the State Board of Health of New Hampshire. He had charge of the small-pox...

Biography of Horace LeRoy Choate

Horace LeRoy Choate, a wellknown and respected farmer of Hopkinton, N.H., was born in Henniker, Merrimack County, April 20, 1833, a son of George and Betsey Davis Choate. He is a lineal descendant of one John Choate, who was a son of Robert and Sarah Choate, and was baptized at Groton, Boxford, Colchester, England, June 6, 1624. In 1643 John emigrated to New England, and at the age of nineteen was a resident of Chebacco in Ipswich, Mass. Soon after he bought up shares of common lands allotted to the proprietors on Hog Island (which acquired its name from its resemblance to a hog lying on its back in the water), and in 1690 he was almost the sole owner of its three hundred acres. The earliest deed extant, dated in 1678, was for the site of the present Choate house, the birthplace of the Hon. Rufus Choate, New England’s great jurist and advocate. John Choate was often in disgrace, the records showing that he was frequently before the magistrates, and not always for the offence of some one else. He was tried for stealing apples, but was acquitted; and he was arraigned for lying, but the charge was dismissed. In numerous other cases by the use of his own keen wit he succeeded in evading punishment. He was a natural litigant and lawyer, and his fertility of resource in defence seems to have been transmitted to his descendants with increasing power. Thomas Choate, son of the first John, born at Chebacco, Ipswich, Mass., in 1671, resided on Hog Island. A very prominent man, he was familiarly known as...

Biography of Horace Childs

Horace Childs, a pioneer railroad bridge builder in New England, is a prominent resident of Henniker, Merrimack County, N.H. He was born in this town, August 10, 1807, son of Solomon, Jr., and Mary (Long) Childs. He is a lineal descendant of William Childs or Child, a brother of Ephraim Child, who emigrated from England, and settled in Watertown, Mass., in 1630. The family, which was a notable one in England, sustained the dignity of a coat of arms. William Child was made a freeman at Watertown in 1634, and became a landowner there. His son John was conspicuous in the public affairs of Watertown. He died at the age of forty years. The third in this line was John Childs, Jr., son of John and Mary (Warren) Child; and the fourth, his son Jonathan, born in Watertown in 1696, who settled in Grafton, Mass., where he died in 1787, in the ninety-second year of his age. From the “Genealogy of the Child, Childs, and Childe Families,” by Elias Child, published in 1881, chapter viii., relating to the Watertown branch, we learn that Jonathan Child married in 1729 Abigail Parker, and had eight children, the eldest, Josiah, born in 1730, the youngest, Joseph, born in 1753. Ruth, born in 1740, and the sixth, Solomon, born January 31, 1744. The same record of Jonathan Child’s family is in the History of Grafton, Mass., except that the year of the birth of Solomon is there given as 1743. The History of Henniker names Solomon as the “son of Josiah and Ruth Childs .” If the foregoing record be correct, he was...

Biography of Frank Henry Carr

Frank Henry Carr, one of the patriotic men who periled his life in the cause of the Union during the late Civil War, now an enterprising mill-owner of West Hopkinton, was born in West Hopkinton, February 8, 1841, son of Thomas W. and Caroline (Connor) Carr. The grandfather, John Carr, removed from West Newbury, Mass., to Concord, N.H., where he kept an inn for a short time. From Concord he came to West Hopkinton about the year 1821, making his residence on a farm which had been presented to his wife by her brother, Thomas Williams. While a carriage-maker by trade, he had a natural aptitude for general mechanical work. One of the most cherished possessions of his grandson’s family to-day is an old ‘cello made by him in his leisure hours. In politics he was an ardent Whig. He died on the old farm at the age of seventy-five. His wife, Abigail, who survived him some years, attaining the age of eighty-six, was a magnificent specimen of New England womanhood, strong, energetic, and cheerful up to the day of her death. She left a lasting impression upon her grandchildren, then growing up about her. Mr. and Mrs. John Carr had a family of eight children-Anna, Eliza, Emma, Abigail, Almira, Helen, Samuel, and Thomas Williams. Thomas W. Carr spent his early life upon the farm. While quite a young man, he was a Captain of militia. Later he engaged in farming and lumbering. The latter business was carried on in a factory the beam of which was twenty-four inches square and seventy feet long, and much heavy timber was...

Biography of Daniel F. Wyman

Daniel F. Wyman, a successful lumber dealer of Henniker and an ex-member of the New Hampshire legislature, was born in the southern part of this town, November 29, 1826. His maternal ancestors were early settlers in New Hampshire. Moses Harriman, his great-grandfather, Plaistow in 1736. His grandparents, Eldad and Lydia (White) Harriman, who were industrious farming people, lived to be eighty-four years old. Daniel resided with his grandparents until he was sixteen or seventeen years old. Then he learned daguerreotyping; and, after following it for a time, he sold out his apparatus and became a clerk for James Peverly in Concord. A year later he was employed in the same capacity in Henniker. Subsequently Mr. Wyman visited Ohio for the purpose of seeing the country. In 1849 he formed a partnership with Jonas Wallace, the father of Judge Robert M. Wallace, of Milford, and for some years was engaged in a general mercantile business in Henniker. He then returned to the farm for the purpose of managing the property and caring for his aged grandparents and mother. After the death of the former he settled the estate. He then took up his residence in Henniker village, bought timber lands, and established himself in the lumber business, which he has since successfully followed. He erected houses in Henniker and Manchester with lumber which he cut and sawed. He has invested to a considerable extent in city property in Los Angeles, Cal., which he visited eight years ago, spending several months in sight-seeing upon the Pacific slope. He spent the winter of 1875 and 1876 in Florida. In politics he is...

Pin It on Pinterest