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Hutchinson Family of Norwich Vermont

Hutchinson is an old and numerous family in Norwich, as well as in other parts of the country. They were among the early settlers of Massachusetts and were in Lynn and Salem in that colony as early as 1628, or 1629. A descendant of these early colonists, named Abijah, who was a tailor, removed from Salem to Windham early in the eighteenth century. His son Samuel, born about 1719, in company with his son, John, came to Norwich in 1765. They cleared an island in the Connecticut River, opposite the present residency of John W. Loveland, and planted it with corn. In the fall of that year they returned to Connecticut, and in company with a younger son, Samuel, returned in the spring of 1766, and made a permanent settlement. The elder Samuel spent the remainder of his life in the town, and died February 8, 1809. His wife was Jemina Dunham; she died January 12, 1798. Besides the two sons named above, he had three daughters: Sarah, married Francis Smalley; Tabitha, married Jonathan Delano; Jerusha, married Nathan Roberts. They all died young,’ soon after marriage. Hutchinson, John, son of Samuel, was born in 1741, in Windham, Connecticut, and married Mary Wilson, who was born in Ashford, Connecticut, in August, 1744. He enlisted in the Continental Army, and died at Philadelphia, June 22, 1778. His widow afterwards married Solomon Strong. His children were: Jerome Hutchinson, see further; John Hutchinson, who removed to New York State, where he died; Lydia Hutchinson, who was probably the first child born in Norwich, married D. Hammond, of Thetford; Abigail Hutchinson, married Honorable John...

Biography of Edmund Raymond Kinsey

Edmund Raymond Kinsey, president of the board of public service of St. Louis and identified in a professional capacity with the public interests of the city since 1912, was born in Muscatine, Iowa, January 24, 1873, his parents being William M. and Lucy Loretta (Chapin) Kinsey. In the paternal line he is descended from one of the old and distinguished American families that has figured prominently in public affairs throughout the history of the nation. A member of this family was one of the first justices of. the supreme court of Pennsylvania and his portrait is over one of the three chairs in the old courtroom in Independence Hall at Philadelphia, in the room occupied by the supreme court when that city was the national capital. The first representative of the family in America came to the new world with William Penn, settling in Philadelphia, and through many generations the family has been connected with the Society of Friends or Quakers. William M. Kinsey, a lawyer by profession, also became a lawmaker, serving as a member of the fifty-first congress from the tenth district of Missouri. He was judge of the St. Louis circuit court for a period of twelve years, from 1904 until 1916, and in many ways has left the impress of his individuality upon the legal records of the state. At the time of the Civil war, when but sixteen years of age, he endeavored to enlist in the Union army, but his father would not permit him to go to the front. He was very active in support of many interests of the late war...

Biography of Edward S. Smith

EDWARD S. SMITH. – The death of Edward Slade Smith, at San Francisco, California, on December 31, 1885, and incidents relating to his life gathered from recollections of Judge Charles H. Berry, Honorable John A. Mathews and Doctor James M. Cole. Edward Slade Smith was born in what was then Chemung, now Schuyler county, in the State of New York, February 28, 1827; and hence at his decease he was nearly fifty-nine years old. His parents were Joel and Anna Smith, both early settlers in Winona, Minnesota, and both of whom are now dead. There were born to them six sons and four daughters. Edward Slade Smith, the second son, gave early promise of those traits of character of that enterprise, activity, and great perseverance, which were the leading features of his life. His school advantages were not adequate to his ambitious needs in after life; but his native genius and inherent judgment seldom failed him. After a reverse in his early business career, his experiences became his best educators; and they afforded him knowledge not attainable in colleges. However, his common-school acquirements were sufficient for his business purposes; and his mind was enlightened, and his views of life broadened, by extensive reading and intercourse with the able men of the West. In 1852 he came to Minnesota. Having been previously engaged with his eldest brother, Lorenzo D. Smith, in the lumber business at Gibson, New York, he very naturally saw the advantages that the site of the Falls of St. Anthony afforded for an immense water-power and manufacturing city. There had been a small mill put up somewhere...

Biography of George J. Lewis

The life history of him whose name heads this sketch is closely identified with the annals of the northwest, and he is ex-secretary of the state of Idaho. An important department of the governmental service of the commonwealth has thus been entrusted to him, and in the discharge of his duties he manifested a loyalty to the public good that was above question and reflected credit upon the Party that called him to office. He is a western man and possesses the progressive spirit so characteristic of the region this side of the Mississippi. His birth occurred in Minneapolis, Minnesota, on the 28th of March, 1861. He is a representative of an old New England family that was established in Connecticut in early colonial days, and when the war of the Revolution was inaugurated bearers of the name joined the forces of General Washington and fought for the independence of the nation. The father of our subject, Isaac I. Lewis, was born in Meriden, Connecticut, in 1825, and is still living, in the seventy-fourth year of his age. He married Georgiana Christmas, a native of Wooster, Ohio, and removed to Illinois at an early period in the history of that state. He was also a pioneer of Minnesota, and in connection with his father aided in founding the city of Minneapolis. He was a druggist, surveyor and metallurgist, and is now engaged in mining on Wood River, Idaho, his residence being in Ketchum. He removed to Montana, in 1872, locating in Helena, and became the owner of very valuable mining interests in that state. From the Elkhorn mine, on...

Biography of William H. Watt

William H. Watt, the president of the Delia Mountain Mining Company, has been largely instrumental in developing the natural resources of Idaho thus far, and his labors have not alone contributed to his individual prosperity but have also largely promoted the material interests of the state. By nativity a Canadian, he was born near Ottawa City, in the Dominion, December 23, 1851, and is of English descent. His grandfather, James Watt, was a native of England, and as an officer in the British army fought through the Crimean war. When his term of military ser-vice expired he crossed the Atlantic to Canada, where he lived to the ripe old age of eighty-two years. His son, John Watt, father of our subject, was born in Canada and married Miss Ann Malcomson, also a native of Ottawa. They were industrious and well-to-do farming people, and were Episcopalians in religious belief. Mr. Watt departed this life in the seventieth year of his age, but his wife is now living, at the age of three-score years and ten, on the old Canadian homestead. They had eleven children, ten of whom are yet living, the greater part of the number being residents of the old home neighborhood in Canada, though one is now living in West Bay City, Michigan, and one in Butte, Montana. William H. Watt, the fourth in order of birth, was reared under the parental roof and acquired his preliminary education in the public schools of Canada, after which he pursued a course in a business college of Minneapolis, Minnesota. He entered upon his business career as a farmer and also...

Biography of Joseph R. Numbers, M. D.

A member of the medical fraternity of Weiser, Washington County, Dr. Numbers was born in Lexington, Ohio, May 30, 1864, and traces his ancestry back to some of the early colonists of Pennsylvania, who were of German lineage. His father, Esau Numbers, was born in the Keystone state, November 1, 1816, and became one of the pioneer farmers of Ohio, whither he removed in 1840. He married Miss Anna Smith, of western Ohio, and to them were born eight children, but only three are now living. Their eldest son, William Numbers, died in the service of his country in the great civil war, losing his life at Cumberland Gap. The mother departed this life in 1877, at the age of fifty-six years, and in 1888 the father accompanied Dr. Numbers to Idaho, spending his last days in Weiser, where his death occurred when he had reached the advanced age of eighty-two years. Dr. Numbers acquired his literary education in the Ohio Central College and prepared for his profession in the Eclectic Medical Institute, of Cincinnati, where he was graduated in the class of 1885. He entered upon the practice of his chosen calling in Kansas, where he remained one year, and then went to Minneapolis, Minnesota, being a representative of the medical fraternity of that city for two years. Since 1888 he has been a resident of Weiser, where he has built up a large and lucrative practice that many an older physician might well envy. He has a broad, comprehensive and accurate knowledge of the principles of the science of medicine and by the faithful performance of each...

Biography of Robert J. Anderson

A glance at the history of past centuries will indicate at once what would be the condition of the world if the mining interests no longer had a part in the industrial and commercial life. Only a few centuries ago agriculture was almost the only occupation of man. A landed proprietor surrounded himself with his tenants and his serfs who tilled his broad fields, while he reaped the reward of their labors; but when the rich mineral resources of the world were placed upon the market industry found its way into new and broader fields, minerals were used in the production of thousands of new articles of trade and in the production of hundreds of inventions, and the business of nations was revolutionized when considering these facts we can in a measure determine the value to mankind of the mining interests. One who is now prominently connected with the development of the rich mineral resources of the northwest is Mr. Anderson, whose name heads this sketch, the promoter and the organizer of the Twin Springs Placer Mining Company. A native of Minnesota, Mr. Anderson was born in the town of Eden Prairie, February 19, 1856 and in 1894 came to Idaho, since which time he has been engaged in developing the great mining enterprise, of which he has since been the manager, and which he has brought to successful completion, attracting to it a capital of a half a million dollars, furnished principally by wealthy men of Philadelphia. The plant of the company is located forty miles northeast of Boise, where they have a flume six feet and two...

Biography of Joseph B. Blades, M. D.

Joseph B. Blades, M. D. For a period of twelve years the health and sanitation of Randall, Jewell County, had been safeguarded by the zeal and skill of Dr. Joseph Brewer Blades, whose entire professional career had been passed in this community. He is one of the men who have brought to their honored calling high scholarship, thorough training and equipment and a full realization of the importance and responsibility of their profession, and his professional associates and the public generally have been prompt to testify to his ability and to the value of his services in their midst. Joseph Brewer Blades comes of a family that had lived in America since prior to the War of the Revolution and was born July 5, 1876, on a farm in Ottawa County, Kansas, being a son of Harrison and Thirza Augusta (Brewer) Blades. His grandfather, Samuel Thomas Blades, was born in the East, probably in Maryland, and followed a seafaring life, his death occurring in 1887 at Baltimore. In that city, in 1845, was born Harrison Blades, who was reared there and received his education in the public schools. In his youth he followed various pursuits without getting any real start in life, but in 1870 came to the West, settling on a homestead farm of 160 acres in Ottawa County, which he proved up and cultivated for several years. After his marriage he settled on the homestead of his wife, a tract of eighty acres in the same county, and in later years disposed of his 160-acre property by sale and rounded out his career on the smaller farm,...

Biographical Sketch of Egbert Nelson Fairchild

Fairchild, Egbert Nelson; flour mfgr.; born, Peekskill, N. Y., Sept. 28, 1868; son of Egbert Henry and Mary Seymour Fairchild; public school education; married, Buffalo, N. Y., Oct. 4, 1893, Gertrude A. Kenny; two daughters Catherine and Mary; in flour milling business twenty-seven years; becoming pres. of the Cleveland Milling Co. in 1910; before that mgr. Pittsburgh Flour Co., Minneapolis; member Cleveland Athletic and Euclid Golf...

Biographical Sketch of Charles Emerson Burton

Burton, Charles Emerson; clergyman; born, Iowa, March 19, 1869; son of John Henry and Jane A. Simons Burton; educated, Carleton College, A. B., 1895, M. A., 1898, Chicago Theological Seminary, King; issue,B. D., 1898, Carleton College, D. D., 1911; married; Menoken, N. D., Oct. 17, 1898, Cora Viola Dorothy Viola, Lyndon David, Malcolm King and Myron Simons; preached before and during college course in the missions and churches of the Congregational order of Minneapolis; spent summer vacations preaching in home missionary churches in Minnesota and North Dakota; pastor Puritan Church, Chicago, 1895-1898, Lyndale Church, Minneapolis, 1899-1909; associate pastor to Dr. Washington Gladden, First Congregational Church, Columbus, O., 1909 and 1910; began pastorate Euclid Avenue Church, Cleveland, March 1, 1911; trustee Congregational Home Missionary Society, New York, Congregational Union, Cleveland, National Anti-Saloon League; former trustee of Carleton College and Chicago Theological Seminary; member Delta Sigma Rho (honor) Fraternity; member Business Men’s Club, Y. M. C. A., and Congregational Club, Cleveland and vicinity (pres. 1913-1914); won oratorical honors of college and state of Minnesota; interested in social and civic application of religion, helped organize Minneapolis Congregational Union, Council of Churches, Columbus, and Federated Churches,...
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