Discover your family's story.

Enter a grandparent's name to get started.

Start Now

Biography of Paul Brigham

Hon. Paul Brigham, son of Paul and Catharine (Turner) Brigham, born in Coventry, Connecticut, January 17, 1746; married, October 3, 1767, Lydia Sawyer, of Hebron, Connecticut; came to Norwich from Coventry, in the spring of 1782, bringing his family with him, all of his children having been born in Connecticut. In 1788, he built the house on ”Brigham Hill,” for many years occupied by his great-granddaughter, the late Miss Louisa D. Brigham. The farm had been previously owned and occupied by Elihu Baxter. In what esteem Mr. Brigham was held by the people of his adopted state and town, is shown under appropriate heads in other places in this volume. Captain Paul Brigham in the Revolutionary Army, June-August 1777. Mr. Brigham served four years as Captain in the Continental Army in a Connecticut regiment commanded, first, by Colonel Chandler and afterwards by Colonel Isaac Sherman. He entered the Army January 1, 1777, and was discharged April 22, 1781. A portion of the time he served under the immediate command of Washington, and was engaged in the important battles of Germantown, Monmouth, and Fort Mifflin. He was enlisted by General McDougal from Coventry, Conn., and his regiment seems to have been largely composed of men from that section of the State. We have been privileged to read a fragment of a diary kept by Captain Brigham during a part of his army service above the “Highlands,” which does not cover the time when any of the above named battles were fought (at that time the portion of the army to which he was attached was serving on the Hudson River), and...

Biography of Honorable Daniel Buck

Daniel Buck came to Norwich in 1784 or ’85, and opened the first lawyer’s office in town, on the hill near the old center meeting house, then just being completed and there continued to live and transact business for twenty-five years, or until he removed to Chelsea in 1809. Norwich then contained probably about one thousand inhabitants, but no village, there being at that time not over three or four dwellings where Norwich village now stands. But little is known of Mr. Buck previous to his coming to Norwich. He was born at Hebron, Conn., November 9, 1753, and was the second son and child of Thomas and Jane Buck of that town. He had been a soldier in the Revolution, and had lost an arm at the battle of Bennington. He had also lived some time in Thetford, which was settled largely by people from Hebron, and perhaps also in Hanover, N. H. He acted as secretary to the council in June, 1785, when the Vermont legislature assembled at Norwich, having been assistant secretary of the same body during their session at Rutland the preceding October. He seems to have been a householder at Norwich at this time, as by a resolution of the council on June 17, the treasurer of the State was directed “to pay Daniel Buck twenty shillings hard money for the use of his house, etc.” For several years the young attorney does not appear to have made much headway in his profession, the townspeople sharing in the ancient dislike to lawyers so prevalent in the early days of New England. The town records...

First Settlements in Norwich Vermont

Having glanced thus briefly at the action of the Norwich proprietors in opening a way to reach their new township in the wilderness, and in dividing up a portion of its surface into lots suitable to become the homesteads of future settlers, let us pause a moment and see what had meantime been done in the work of actual settlement. I am indebted to Rev. Edmund F. Slafter of Boston for an interesting account of what was unquestionably the first attempt at settlement made within the limits of the town. I quote from the Slafter Memorial: “Samuel Slafter [of Mansfield, Connecticut], the father of John Slafter, being an original proprietor, and being at the first meeting chosen treasurer of the corporation, took a deep interest in the settlement of the town. At his suggestion, his son John made a journey through the forests of New Hampshire in 1762, to examine the territory and report upon the advantages it might offer as a place of settlement. He found it pleasantly situated on the western banks of the Connecticut, with a good soil, but for the most part of an uneven, hilly surface. He reported it well watered, not only by the Connecticut but by several small, clear streams, and by one more important one called the Ompompanoosuc, an Indian name signifying ‘the place of very white stones’ whose waters emptied themselves into the Connecticut at the northeastern part of the town. As he was inclined to engage in the settlement of the new town, the next year (June 7, 1763) his father transferred to him as ‘a token of his...

David Todd of Charlemont MA

David Todd6, (Titus5, Titus4, Benjamin3, Michael2, Christopher1) born March 17, 1807, died in 1880, married Dec. 1, 1831, Clarissa Bradford of Williamsburg, Mass., who was born Sept. 15, 1808, died in 1884. She was in the sixth generation in direct line from Governor Bradford of the Mayflower and Plymouth Colony. He was a Methodist Clergyman and as to his pastorates, his son, Stephen Olin Todd says: “soon after he began preaching he was located at Winchendon, Mass.; thence to Haddam or Haddam Neck, Conn., about 1834, he went next to Hebron, Conn., in 1836, later he was at Londenderry and Wilmington, Vt., about 1848 to 1852; thence to Amherst, Mass., 1853; Feeding Hills, Mass., 1854; and South Deerfield, Mass., 1855.” Retiring he bought a place at South Deerfield where he lived until 1863; thence he moved to Charlemont, Mass., where he lived until his death in 1880. His widow sold their place in Charlemont in 1883, and went to live with her daughter Ruth, who then lived in St. Johnsbury Center, Vt., where she died four years later. He was chosen selectman in Charlemont, Mass., in the year 1869. His son says about this fact: “it is strange what little circumstances alter relations. The year my father was selectman, heavy rains gutted a large number of the town’s roads, so badly that the tax rate had to be increased, thus the selectmen incurred the displeasure of their townsmen and were not re-elected.” He was a member of the Methodist Episcopal conference for about thirty years. Children: *927. Millicent Ruth, b. Aug. 25, 1832. *928. William Sheridan, b. Jan. 1,...

Pin It on Pinterest