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Biographical Sketch of Frank Billings

Billings, Frank; merchant; born, Hastings, N. Y., Sept. 275, 1853; son of George Whitfield and Elizabeth Ann Warren Billings; married, Cleveland, April 18, 1895, Elizabeth Tod; pres. The Tod Stambaugh Co.; vice pres. The Billings Chapin Co.; director Bank of Commerce, Superior Savings & Trust Co., Guardian Savings Trust Co., and National Refining Co.; trustee Lakeside Hospital, Hiram House, and Babies’ Dispensary; member Union, Country, Mayfield Country and Chagrin Valley Hunt...

From Yonkers to West Point along the Hudson River

Passing Glenwood, now a suburban station of Yonkers, conspicuous from the Colgate mansion near the river bank, built by a descendant of the English Colgates who were familiar friends of William Pitt, and leaders of the Liberal Club in Kent, England, and “Greystone,” once the country residence of the late Samuel J. Tilden, Governor of New York, and presidential candidate in 1876, we come to Hastings to Dobbs Ferry Hastings, where a party of Hessians during the Revolutionary struggle were surprised and cut to pieces by troops under Colonel Sheldon. It was here also that Lord Cornwallis embarked for Fort Lee after the capture of Fort Washington, and here in 1850 Garibaldi, the liberator of Italy, whose centennial was observed July 4, 1907, frequently came to spend the Sabbath and visit friends when he was living at Staten Island. Although there is apparently little to interest in the village, there are many beautiful residences in the immediate neighborhood, and the Old Post road for two miles to the northward furnishes a beautiful walk or driveway, well shaded by old locust trees. The tract of country from Spuyten Duyvil to Hastings was called by the Indians Kekesick and reached east as far as the Bronx River. Dobbs Ferry is now at hand, named after an old Swedish ferryman. The village has not only a delightful location but it is also beautiful in itself. In 1781 it was Washington’s headquarters, and the old house, still standing, is famous as the spot where General Washington and the Count de Rochambeau planned the campaign against Yorktown; where the evacuation of New York was...

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