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Biographical Sketch of Baker, Mosley, Captain

Captain Baker, being closely identified with the people of Fort Bend County during the passage of the Mexican army, through what is now Fort Bend, but then Austin County, where he made such a heroic stand at San Felipe as to cause the Mexican army to abandon the attempt there and come on down the river to Fort Bend and make the passage, we add this notice of him in our history: He came from Alabama to Texas in 1834, and, becoming prominent in the affairs .of the country, and so opposed to Mexican aggression, that he was on the list of those proscribed by Colonel Ugartechea of the Mexican army and his arrest ordered at San Felipe. While he was in command at that point, during the Mexican invasion, the town was burned, Captain Baker said by order of General Houston, but Houston said his order had been misunderstood, that he gave no such order. Captain Baker was wounded, at the battle of San Jacinto, where his company displayed great gallantry. He represented Galveston in the Congress of the Republic in 1838 and 1839, and died of yellow fever in Houston, November the 4th,...

Biographical Sketch of McElroy, Charles S.

Mr. McElroy Is one of the old settlers of Fort Bend County who still survives those days of pioneer life, fraught with so much danger and hardships, danger from Indian raids and Mexican invasion, and hardships incident to a new and undeveloped country, where the wilderness had to be subdued, far removed from the necessaries of life, except as they could carve them out in their new homes with the ax and, rude agricultural implements. Sometimes the sole dependence for food was the ripe as the long months went by, waiting for the maturity of some primitive crop, which was watched with zealous care to keep the wild animals of the woods from destroying it until the time of gathering came. Mr. McElroy was born in 1827, and came to Texas with his father, Phillip, in 1832, from Connecticut. They first settled on the Colorado River, eight miles below the present city of Austin, which was then not in existence. The headright league of the elder McElroy was located here, as were several others at that day and time. They had nat long remained in their new home, and began to accumulate some of the comforts of life, when the few settlers in that region were greatly alarmed and disturbed by an Indian attack, in which two settlers, Harris and Christian, lost their lives, and another one, Josiah Wilbarger, was scalped alive, after being badly wounded. Reuben Hornsby, who was with them, barely escaped with his life. Soon after this distressing episode of frontier life, the McElroys left that country and came dawn on the Brazos and settled at...

Biography of Fields, W. I.

Who lived many years in Fort Bend County, and died there, and whose remains rest in her soil, was born in Jefferson County, Kentucky, March 2, 1834. In 1855 he went to Howard County, Indiana, and was made a Royal Arch Mason there in 1857. In 1858 Mr. Fields moved to Grayson County, Texas, arriving here in January, but first returned to Kentucky from Indiana before concluding to make Texas his home. During those days the Indians often raided Cook and Montague Counties, and Mr. Fields accompanied several expeditions against them, in which battles were fought of more or less magnitude. In the fall of 1859 he was in the Wichita Mountains during an exceptionally dry year. Red River and, its tributaries were dry for 100 miles, but around the mountains were fine springs. The buffalo, were traveling south, and had to stop for water at these springs, feeding for fifteen or twenty miles around, and returning for eater at night. The whole country was black with them, and from the top of a, mountain overlooking the surrounding valleys thirty thousand buffalo could be seen at a sight, as near as could be estimated. There was no water due south from there for buffalo or stock of any kind for 200 miles, until the Brazos was realid, near Waco. Mr. Fields had a corn crop in 1859 which was a failure, and having traveled over the northern States in 1856-57 got the idea of subsoiling. He put this in practice on his black waxy land in the fall of 1859 and spring of 1860, another dry year, and while...

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