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Descendants of Leonard Crocker Couch of Taunton MA

COUCH (Taunton family). The family bearing this name at Taunton whose representative head is now Leonard Crocker Couch, Esq., who since boyhood has been a resident of the city, occupied in mechanical and business lines, and for years one of the substantial men and useful citizens of the community, is one of long and honorable standing in the neighboring State of Connecticut and of distinction in our country. And through its Taunton alliance of a generation ago – that of Maj. Gen. Darius Nash Couch, of Civil war fame, the father of the present Leonard Crocker Couch just alluded to – with the family of Crockers, it is connected with some of the first families of Ancient Taunton and of the Bay State, among them the Leonards. Simon Couch, ancestor of the Taunton family of the name, appears as a freeman of Fairfield, Conn., in October, 1664. From manuscript in the possession of a descendant a tradition is found that Thomas and Simon Couch ran away from England, secreting themselves on board a vessel; sailed for America; that they landed at New Haven, where they separated, Thomas going to the east and Simon westward as far as Greens Farms, etc. Simon Couch married Mary, daughter of Francis Andrews, of Bankside. He became a large land-holder at Greens Farms. His will was probated in 1689. He was buried on land belonging to him at Frost Point, looking out over the sound, which he had set apart as a family burying ground and which was long known as the Couch Burial Hill. His wife survived him, dying in 1691. In his...

Biography of Nathaniel G. Cruzen

Nathaniel G. Cruzen was born in Jefferson county, Virginia, October 14, 1826, and is the son of Richard R., and Aurelia W. (North) Cruzen. His father was born in Loudoun county, Virginia, and for thirty years filled the position of inspector of the National Armory at Harper’s Ferry. His mother was born in Fairfax county, Virginia. Our subject was educated at Harper’s Ferry and worked under his father’s instructions in the armory until he was twenty years of age, and then immigrated to Missouri and settled upon a farm in Saline county, where he remained until 1849. Then becoming imbued with the “gold fever,” young Cruzen went to California and engaged in mining there during four years with fair success. Returning to Saline county he purchased a farm near his father’s, upon which he lived until the outbreaking of the Civil War, when he enlisted at Miami, in December 1861, in Company A, commanded by F. S. Robertson, and followed the fortunes of the cause of the “Sunny South” through four long years of civil strife. The first engagement in which Company A participated was at Kirkpatrick’s Mill, near Knob Noster, December 19, where the whole command was captured by Col. Jeff. C. Davis. Mr. Cruzen was taken to St. Louis and thrown with others into Gratiot Street Prison. After remaining in confinement there during three months, he was transferred to Alton, Illinois, and at the end of six months was exchanged at Vicksburg. He was mustered into Musser’s battalion at Horsehead Station, Arkansas, and the battalion was subsequently consolidated with Col. Jno. B. Clark’s Ninth Missouri Infantry. Mr....

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