Discover your family's story.

Enter a grandparent's name to get started.

Start Now

Pease, Ellen Wheeler – Obituary

Ellen Wheeler Pease was born in Baltimore County, Maryland, March 1, 1824, and died at the home of her son in Chelsea, Dec. 9, 1899 aged 74 years, 9 months and eight days. She was married in 1847 to Louis Pease who died two years ago. The deceased leaves to mourn the loss of a kind and loving mother, six children, Richard Pease and Mrs. John Manatt, both of Chelsea; Mrs. Jennie Garnett of Victor; Mrs. Lizzie Fry of Carnforth; Mrs. Kate Miller of Kansas, and J. K. Pease of South Dakota. They were all present at the funeral but Mrs. Fry who had gone to visit her sister and could not get here. She leaves twenty grandchildren and one great grandchild, also three sisters and two brothers, two sisters in Maryland and two brothers and one sister in Iowa. The remains were brought to Brooklyn, Dec. 12, 1899, where she was laid to rest beside her husband. The relatives and friends have the sympathy of everyone for Mrs. Pease was greatly respected in the community where she had resided. She was a member of the M. E. Church. [Interment Brooklyn Cemetery] Contributed by: Shelli...

Maryland Cemetery Records, Frederick to Montgomery Counties

Maryland Cemetery records are listed by county then name of cemetery within the Maryland county. Most of these are complete indices at the time of transcription, however, in some cases we list the listing when it is only a partial listing. Cheltenham Veterans Cemetery, Cheltenham, MarylandMaryland Cemetery Records, Alleghany to BaltimoreMaryland Cemetery Records, Calvert to Dorchester CountiesMaryland Cemetery Records, Frederick to Montgomery CountiesMaryland Cemetery Records, Prince George to Worcester CountiesRocky Gap Veterans Cemetery Frederick County Following Cemeteries (hosted at Frederick County, Maryland Tombstone Transcription Project) Beaver Dam German Baptist Cemetery Benton Family Cemetery Bush Creek German Brethren Church Cemetery Catholic Church Cemetery Central Chapel United Methodist Church Cronise-Fundenburg Family Cemetery Elias Evangelical Lutheran Cemetery German Reformed Church Cemetery , aka St James Reformed Church Glade Reformed Cemetery Graceham Moravian Cemetery Grossnickle Church of the Brethren Cemetery House-Phillips Cemetery Ira Sears Cemetery Israel’s Creek Keedysville Cemetery Koontz Chapel Kramer-Jacobs Cemetery Linganore Cemetery McLain Family Cemetery McElfresh Burying Ground Mt. Bethel United Methodist Church Cemetery Prospect United Methodist Church Cemetery Providence Methodist Church Cemetery Rocky Springs Cemetery Simmons Family Cemetery St. Ignatius Catholic St. John’s Lutheran Church Cemetery St. John’s Lutheran Church Cemetery St. Mark’s Lutheran Church Cemetery St. Matthews Lutheran Church St. Paul’s Evangelical Lutheran Church Summers Family Cemetery Tom’s Creek Cemetery Whitmore Cemetery Zimmerman Family Cemetery Zion Episcopal Cemetery Following Cemeteries (hosted at Interment) Hawbottom Johnson Family Cemetery Wolfesville Reformed Church Cemetery Garrett County Following Cemeteries (hosted at Garrett County, Maryland Tombstone Transcription Project) Discover your family's story. Enter a grandparent's name to get started. choose a state: Any AL AK AZ AR CA CO CT DE DC FL...

Biography of Edward Stillings

Edward Stillings. Measured not in the abnormal achievement, but in the steady glow of a powerful mind, in an unceasing devotion to his profession, and in a degree of public spirit that allied him as a leader with all the big movements of his time and place, the late Edward Stillings of Leavenworth was one of the big men claimed by Kansas. Nearly thirty years of his life were spent in Leavenworth, where he died February 20, 1890. His reputation was not merely local; professionally it extended from the Atlantic to the Pacific. He was a big man, big in stature, in intellect and in heart. His birth occurred in Maryland, at Havre de Grace, where his father was a planter and slave holder. The institution of slavery never appealed to the elder Stillings, nor did the environment where slavery flourished. When Edward was a small boy the family moved to Ohio, freed their slaves and settled down to make a home near Milford Center in Union County. Edward Stillings was given educational opportunities far superior to that of the average youth, and he was wise enough to take advantage of such opportunities. He attended college in Kentucky at a period when the classics were considered essential to a finished education, and in this branch he excelled, particularly in the Greek language. Having decided upon the practice of law as his vocation, he rode horseback to Massachusetts and there enrolled himself as a student in the law department of Harvard University. After receiving his degree he returned to Ohio and for a time was associated with Judge Cole at...

Pin It on Pinterest