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Hart Family of Orange County NC

This is a self published manuscript of the Hart Family from Orange County, North Carolina.

The great ancestor of the Hart family in the United States emigrated from London about 1690 and settled in Hanover County, Virginia, where he died leaving an only son, Thomas Hart, who was about eleven years of age when his father arrived in Virginia. Of the elder Thomas little is known except that he was a merchant and probably late in life, a blind man. This manuscript begins with the son, Thomas Hart, Jr. who married Susanna Rice. After the death of Thomas Jr., Susanna and all of her children: Thomas, John, Benjamin, David, Nathaniel, and Ann, moved to Orange County, North Carolina.

Life and travels of Colonel James Smith – Indian Captivities

James Smith, pioneer, was born in Franklin county, Pennsylvania, in 1737. When he was eighteen years of age he was captured by the Indians, was adopted into one of their tribes, and lived with them as one of themselves until his escape in 1759. He became a lieutenant under General Bouquet during the expedition against the Ohio Indians in 1764, and was captain of a company of rangers in Lord Dunmore’s War. In 1775 he was promoted to major of militia. He served in the Pennsylvania convention in 1776, and in the assembly in 1776-77. In the latter year he was commissioned colonel in command on the frontiers, and performed distinguished services. Smith moved to Kentucky in 1788. He was a member of the Danville convention, and represented Bourbon county for many years in the legislature. He died in Washington county, Kentucky, in 1812. The following narrative of his experience as member of an Indian tribe is from his own book entitled “Remarkable Adventures in the Life and Travels of Colonel James Smith,” printed at Lexington, Kentucky, in 1799. It affords a striking contrast to the terrible experiences of the other captives whose stories are republished in this book; for he was well treated, and stayed so long with his red captors that he acquired expert knowledge of their arts and customs, and deep insight into their character.

Biography of William Green

William Green. A Topeka merchant whose name has become synonymous in that city with the highest quality of wares and the most reliable methods of merchandising, William Green came to Kansas in 1885 from Green County, Wisconsin. For more than thirty years he has been identified with the material progress of Topeka and his name would undoubtedly be considered among the first mentioned as foremost citizens. A native of England he was born in Derbyshire on November 17, 1844. When he was about six years of age, in 1851, his parents Joseph and Ruth (Cooper) Green left their English farm and emigrated to America. The ship Florida, a sailing vessel, brought them over in thirty days. Going to Green County, Wisconsin, Joseph Green was a farmer there a few years, and afterwards operated a water power flouring mill at Dayton, Wisconsin, where both he and his wife died. Reared on a Wisconsin farm, and in his father’s mill, William Green had limited opportunities for an education. When he was about nineteen years of age his loyalty to his adopted country was put to the test and he enlisted March 31, 1864, in Company C of the Thirty-seventh Wisconsin Infantry. He served with that regiment until the close of the war. Going out as a private and mustered in as eighth corporal, he went through the five grades of sergeant, was promoted to second lieutenant, and was finally discharged in September, 1865, as first lieutenant. He went to the front at Cold Harbor, Virginia, in June and on the seventeenth of that month got his baptism of fire. In the...

Biographical Sketch of Ernest M. Post

Post, Ernest M.; insurance; born, Avoca, Louisiana, Sept. 1, 1862; son of Ralph B. and Ellen Deming Post; educated, Norwalk, Conn., and Hanover, Va.: married, Milwaukee, Wis., March 27, 1894, Alice C. Paine; 1882 to 1892, connected with the firm of R. B. Post & Son, wholesale grocers, New Orleans; in 1892, entered the employ of The Mutual Life Insurance Co. of New York, in New Orleans; was transferred to Milwaukee, Wis., in 1893; in 1903, was made mgr. of the company for the territory of Northern Michigan and Northern Wisconsin; the following year, was put in charge of the company’s interests in Indiana, with headquarters in Indianapolis; was appointed mgr. for Northwestern Ohio, in 1907; member Euclid, and Athletic Clubs, and Chamber of...

Biography of Benjamin B. Harris

Benjamin B. Harris, attorney at law, City Clerk of San Bernardino, and treasurer of the Society of California Pioneers-of San Bernardino County, was born in Hanover County, Virginia, in 1824. When seventeen years of age he went to Nashville, Tennessee, and was there educated, graduating at Nashville University in 1845; studied law in a private office in that State, and was admitted to the bar of Tennessee. In 1847 he went to Panola County, Texas, expecting to remain there permanently, but the climate being malarious he suffered with liver troubles, which necessitated a change in his purposes. After the discovery of gold in California, he resolved to emigrate to the new El Dorado, and in March, 1849, started with a pack mule train of fifty-two men, to cross the plains, coming by the way of old El Paso, Chihuahua, Santa Cruz, Mexico, through Tucson and Yuma, Arizona. They had some trouble with the Apache Indians, who dogged their trail for days, and with whom they had a bloodless skirmish or two; the Indians knowing the superiority of the emigrants’ fire-arms, kept out of range of their guns. On crossing the Colorado river, where Yuma is now situated, they found it swollen by the melting mountain snows, to the width of 1 500 feet, and it was found necessary to improvise a ferry-boat in which to bring over their party, together with the baggage and supplies. This was done by appropriating the body of an abandoned wagon, making it water-tight by caulking the cracks with strips secured by tearing their shirts, and then pouring in melted beef tallow, which hardened...

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