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Biography of Hon. James B. Reavis

Much interest attaches to the life and work of an attorney such as Mr. Reavis, whose chief endeavor both privately and professionally has been to realize a high degree of public justice. He is a man whom the people feel safe in having by; for they can trust his sagacity and integrity, knowing that he is thoroughly incorruptible by any influence, corporate or otherwise. He is one of the men of whom both unscrupulous politicians and monopolies have a wholesome fear. Glancing at his ancestry, we observe that he came honestly by these rugged qualities, being in lineal descent from among those who have subdued and civilized America. He was born in Boone county, Missouri, in 1848. His parents were Kentuckians, his grandparents Virginians, and on the maternal side were descended from the colonial Lee family of Revolutionary fame. Mr. Reavis received his education at Lexington, Kentucky, and studying law was admitted to practice at Hannibal, Missouri, in 1872. He also began to exert a wide influence in that state as the editor of the Appeal, at Monroe; but his prospects in journalism were voluntarily relinquished in view of his removal to California in 1874. In that state he engaged in the practice of his profession, making his home at Chico. His characteristic and hereditary restlessness, however, led him to seek a new field, and in 1880 he came to Washington Territory, making his first home at Goldendale, where he formed a partnership with Hon. R.O. Dunbar. This was a strong combination; and for two years a very active business was conducted. In 1882 he removed to Yakima, and...

Biography of Rev. Patrick Joseph Kane

Rev. Patrick Joseph Kane, who for a third of a century has been pastor of the Church of Our Holy Redeemer at Webster Groves, is a native of Ireland but during his childhood days was brought by his parents to the United States and became a pupil in the public schools of Bloomington, Illinois, where the family home was established. He afterward attended a local business college and later became a student in the Christian Brothers College at St. Louis. Having determined to enter the priesthood he subsequently pursued his theological studies in St. Mary’s Seminary at Baltimore, Maryland, and there received his ordination on the 22d of December, 1882. Father Kane began his active work as a priest at Hannibal, Missouri, where he was assigned to the duty of assistant, remaining there until the 1st of May following, when he was transferred to St. John’s church in St. Louis, at which he officiated as assistant pastor while the regular pastor was making a tour in Europe. In the fall of 1883 Rev. Fr. Kane was appointed pastor of the church of the Immaculate Conception at St. Mary’s, Missouri, and his three and one-half years’ ministry there was remarkably successful. Under his guidance the work of the church and its various societies was thoroughly organized and during the period of his labors there thirty-five or more new members were received into the church, the parish numbering about two hundred families. He spent much time in traveling through the country districts, visiting the members living there and stimulating an interest in the church and its work. His labors resulted in...

Biography of William W. Driggs, Jr.

William W. Driggs, Jr.,is a capable young newspaper man and is now editor of the Bern Gazette in Nemaha county. The Gazette is one of the live papers of that county, and was established in 1898 by M. E. Ford. The editor of the paper was born in Hannibal, Missouri, December 25, 1891. His father is William W. Driggs, Sr., and together they make the firm Driggs & Driggs, publishers of the Bern Gazette. The senior Driggs was born March 25, 1856, in Pennsylvania. At the age of fifteen he learned telegraphy and began working soon afterward as a railroad telegrapher in Pennsylvania, New Jersey, Michigan, Wisconsin and Missouri, and served as general passenger and ticket agent for the Hannibal & St. Joseph Railway when that line was in the bands of a receiver. He subsequently lived at Omaha, Nebraska, and for several years was secretary of the building and loan association there. Coming to Kansas in 1895, he entered the service of the Rock Island Railroad Company and was its agent at Berwick, later at McFarland, and for seven years at Phillipsburg, Kansas. In 1905 he removed to Bern and in March of that year engaged in the hotel business. After two years he resumed employment with the Rock Island Road, on which Bern is a station, and then in 1908 bonght the Bern Gazette. He had been actively identified with that journal ever since, and latterly in association with his son. Mr. Driggs in July, 1908, was appointed postmaster of Bern and still holds that office. He is a republican, a member of the Presbyterian Church and...

Slave Narrative of Emma Knight

Person Interviewed: Emma Knight Location: Hannibal, Missouri Emma Knight, living at 924 North Street, Hannibal Missouri was born in slavery on the farm of Will and Emily Ely, near Florida, Monroe County. The following is her story as she told it: “We lived on a Creek near Florida. We belonged to Will Ely. He had only five slaves, my father and mother and three of us girls. I was only eight or nine years old. De Elys had eight children. Dere was Paula, Ann, Sarah, Becky, Emily, Lizzie, Will, Ike, and Frank. Lizzie was de oldest girl and I was to belong to her when she was married. “De master of de house was better to us dan de mistress. We didn’t have to work none too hard, ’cause we was so young, I guess. We cut weeds along de fences, pulled weeds in de garden and helped de mistress with de hoeing. We had to feed de stock, sheep, hogs, and calves, because de young masters wouldn’t do de work. In de evenings we was made to knit a finger width and if we missed a stitch we would have to pull all the yarn out and do it over. De master’s girls learned us to read and write. We didn’t have hardly no clothes and most of de time dey was just rags. We went barefoot until it got real cold. Our feet would crack open from de cold and bleed. We would sit down and bawl and cry because it hurt so. Mother made moccasins for our feet from old pants. Late in de fall master...

Biography of George W. Pennell

George W. Pennell. It is given to few men to win the prizes of life, and George W. Pennell, of Atchison, belongs to that much favored class. In the building of the great West Mr. Pennell had played a major part. As a young man he had the instinct and the vision uncommon in the average man, which led him away from a comfortable home in a settled community out into the Mississippi Valley, the wonder land of the world. From an inconspicnous youth of vigorous Revolutionary stock, raised on a New York farm, he had become one of the great lumber merchants of the West. Mr. Pennell’s great-grandfather fought as a soldler in the Revolutionary was and his progenitors were substantial New Englanders. His grandfather, John Pennell, was born in Massachusetts in 1774. John Pennell as a young man settled with his family in Ontarlo County, New York, and as one of the pioneers cleared the wildernees in that section, where he lived until his death in Honeoye, that county, in 1859. The father of George W. Pennell was John Pennell, Jr., who was born in Massachusetts in 1798. He married Sally Green, who was born in Vermont in 1817 and died at Honeoye, New York, in 1902, at the ripe old age of eighty-five. Like his father, John Pennell followed the plow. He was a staunch Presbyterian, a whig and later a republican and as such held the office of justice of the peace in his county for many years. He died at his home in Honeoye in 1884. John Pennell and his wife, Sally Green, were...

Biographical Sketch of Minot Judson Savage

Savage, Minot Judson; Clergyman; born, Norridgewock, Me., June, 10, 1841; son of Joseph L. and Ann S. (Stinson) Savage; fitted for college, but did not take course, because of poor health; graduate Bangor Theological Seminary, 1864; (D. D., Harvard, 1896); married Ella A. Dodge, of Harvard, Mass., 1864; Congregational home missionary in California, 1864-1867; pastor, Framingham Mass., 1867-1869, Hannibal, Mo., 1869-1873; became Unitarian; pastor Third Unitarian Church, Chicago, 1873-1874, Church of the Unity, Boston, 1874-1896; minister Church of the Messiah, New York, 1896-1906; retired. Author: Christianity, the Science of Manhood, 1873; The Religion of Evolution, 1876; Light on the Cloud, 1876; Bluffton, a Story of Today, 1878; Life Questions, 18-79; The Morals of Evolution, 1880; Talk About Jesus, 1881; Poems, 1882; Belief in Good, 1881; Beliefs About Man, 1882; Beliefs About the Bible, 1883; The Modern Sphinx, 1883; Man, Woman and Child, 1884; The Religious Life, 1885; Social Problems, 1886; These Degenerate Days, 1887; My Creed, 1887; Religious Reconstruction, 1888; Signs of the Times, 1889; Helps for Daily Living, 1889; Life, 1890; Four Great Questions Concerning God, 1891; The Irrepressible Conflict Between Two World-Theories, 1891; The Evolution of Christianity, 1892: Is this a Good World? 1893; Jesus and Modern Life, 1893; A Ma, 1895; Religion for Today, 1897; Our Unitarian Gospel, 1898; Hymns, 1898; The Minister’s Handbook; Psychics. Facts and Theories; Life’s Dark Problems, 1905; Life Beyond Death, 1901; The Passing and the Permanent in Religion, 1901; Living by the Day, 1901; Men and Women, 1902; Can Telepathy Explain? 1902; Poems, 1905. Editor: Sacred Songs for public Worship (with Howard M. Dow); Unitarian...

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