Discover your family's story.

Enter a grandparent's name to get started.

Start Now

Biography of Jacob Newton Butler, M.D.

Jacob Newton Butler, M.D., of Lempster, N.H., one of the best known physicians in this part of Sullivan County, was born in Lyndeboro, Hillsborough County, this State, February 6, 1821, son of Jacob and Sarah (Blanchard) Butler. His great-grandfather, William Butler, came, it is said, from England, and settled in Essex County, Massachusetts. He married, so we are informed, Sarah Perkins, and had seven children, three sons and four daughters. The three sons enlisted in the War for Independence, and one never came back. One was taken prisoner and carried to Halifax, N.S., where he died of small-pox. The other son, Jonathan Butler, grandfather of Jacob N., was born in Gloucester, Mass., and was the first of the family to settle in Lyndeboro. He served in the battle of Bunker Hill and in many other engagements during the War for Independence. While in the service he worked at his trade of a blacksmith nine months, and later followed his trade in connection with farming. He was Town Clerk for a great many years. He died in 1844, aged ninety-two years; and his wife, Lois Kidder Butler, died in 1846, aged eighty-six years. They were the parents of twelve children, as follows: Sarah, born January 11, 1779; Hannah, born October 27, 1780; Jacob, first, born December 30, 1782; Jonathan, born March 1, 1785; Lois, born April 27, 1787; Rachel, born July 4, 1789; Tryphena, born April 2, 1792; Jacob, second, born June 7, 1794; Mary, born September 4, 1796; Susannah, born September 23, 1798; Lucy, born January 21, 1802; and William, born April 21, 1805. William Butler, who became a...

Biography of Mark Carley

Mark Carley was one of the founders of the city of Champaign: His name appears again and again in connection with the early annals of that city and of Champaign County, and always he appears as a man of force, of almost unlimited enterprise and of a public spirit that was in keeping with his many successes in private life. He knew much of the world by experience and had come to Champaign County soon after returning from an excursion to California during the great gold excitement on the Pacific Coast. His own life was to a large degree the expression of those forces’ accumulated and inherited by him from a notable American ancestry. The Carleys were staunch and patriotic New Englanders. Mark Carley was born at Hancock in Hillsboro County, New Hampshire, August 24, 1799. He was a son of Elijah and Agnes (Graham) Carley and a grandson of Joseph and Sarah (Washburn) Carley. He was thus related to the Washburns whose names appear frequently in New England history, and from the same family came the Washburns who were conspicuous in the early days of Illinois. The Carleys were of Scotch-Irish ancestry. They settled in America long before the Revolution, and one of the cherished possessions of the descendants is a discharge paper signed by George Washington and granting release from the Continental Army to Jonathan Carley, an uncle of the late Mark Carley. By kinship and social ties the Carleys were closely connected with many of the leading families of the New England states and also in the states of New York, Kentucky, Ohio and Illinois. Among...

Biography of Dr. Levi W. Ballard

DR. LEVI W. BALLARD. – The subject of this sketch was born in Petersburg, Hillsborough county, New Hampshire, on December 21, 1815, and is the son of William and T.B. Downing Ballard. He was educated in the common schools of his native place, and went to Hancock Academy in Hancock for two years, after which, in 1837, he came to New Jersey and taught school for three years. After engaging with but poor success in the mercantile business, he removed to Ohio and engaged in different occupations, until finally, taking up the study of medicine, he entered the Cleveland Medical College and graduated as M.D. in 1848. He then engaged in the practice of his profession until 1852; when, on account of the loss of his wife, he, in April of that year, started across the plains to California, where he arrived in September. He followed mining for a time; but, meeting with no success, in January of 1853, he returned via the isthmus of Panama to Ohio to settle up important business. After closing his affairs at that place, he again started across the plains to California, but while on the journey was persuaded to come to Oregon, and arrived at The Dalles July 14, 1853. He remained at The Dalles until 1854, after which he went to Umpqua county, practicing his profession and also raising stock. On the breaking out of the Rogue river war, the Doctor gave his services as surgeon, and remained until the close of hostilities, after which he returned to his home on the Umpqua. In 1857 he returned to Ohio, and was...

Pin It on Pinterest