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West Virginia Naturalization Records

Naturalization to become a U.S. citizen was a two-part process: the Declaration of Intent to Naturalize, or First Papers, and the Naturalization Record (including the Naturalization Petition), or Final Papers. The First Papers were normally filed five years before the Final Papers because of the five-year residency requirement to become a citizen. No centralized files existed before 1906. In 1906 federal forms replaced the various formats that had been used by the various courts. Copies were sent to the Immigration and Naturalization Service (INS), creating a central file for naturalization papers. The INS is now known as the U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services (USCIS). These naturalization records can be found on two different websites, one paid and one free. There is no difference between the indices at either location, it really depends on what software you may be using to record your family tree, as you will want to use Ancestry’s database if you’re using either their online tree or FTM and have a membership. Ancestry – West Virginia, Naturalization Records, 1814-1991 – $$$ Family Search – West Virginia, Naturalization Records, 1814-1991 – Free Barbour County WV Naturalization Law Orders, 1903-1904 Berkeley County WV Declarations of Intention, 1908-1922, v. 1 Declarations of Intention, 1922-1929, v. 2 Declarations of Intention, 1930-1978, v. 3 Naturalization Certificates, 1911-1916 Naturalization Certificates, 1917-1924 Naturalization Certificates, 1924-1929 Naturalization Lists, 1840-1991, v. 1 Naturalization Loose Papers, 1840-1905 Naturalization Petitions, 1930-1946 Naturalization Petitions, 1946-1958 Naturalization Records, 1904-1906, v. 1 Naturalization Records, 1930-1953 Naturalization Records, 1953-1991 Petition Records, 1908-1920, v. 1 Petition Records, 1921-1929, v. 2 Brooke County WV Applications for Oath of Allegiance, 1937 Declarations of Intention,...

Slave Narrative of John W. Matheus

Interviewer: Bishop & Isleman Person Interviewed: John Williams Matheus Location: Steubenville, Ohio Age: 77 Place of Residence: 203 Dock Street WPA in Ohio Federal Writers’ Project Bishop & Isleman Reporter: Bishop (Revision) July 8, 1937 Topic: Ex-Slaves Jefferson County, District #5 JOHN WILLIAMS MATHEUS Ex-Slave, 77 years “My mothers name was Martha. She died when I was eleven months old. My mother was owned by Racer Blue and his wife Scotty. When I was bout eleven or twelve they put me out with Michael Blue and his wife Mary. Michael Blue was a brother to Racer Blue. Racer Blue died when I was three or four. I have a faint rememberance of him dying suddenly one night and see him laying out. He was the first dead person I saw and it seemed funny to me to see him laying there so stiff and still.” “I remember the Yankee Soldier, a string of them on horses, coming through Springfield, W. Va. It was like a circus parade. What made me remember that, was a colored man standing near me who had a new hat on his head. A soldier came by and saw the hat and he took it off the colored man’s head, and put his old dirty one on the colored man’s head and put the nice new one on his own head.” Discover your family's story. Enter a grandparent's name to get started. choose a state: Any AL AK AZ AR CA CO CT DE DC FL GA HI ID IL IN IA KS KY LA ME MD MA MI MN MS MO MT NE NV...

Biography of William Edward Davis

William Edward Davis is the youngest state auditor Kansas had ever had and one of the youngest men who ever held such an official dignity in any of the states. It may also be added, to express a general opinion current at the capital and over the state, that Mr. Davis’ administration as suditor had been a synonym of efficiency and economy. He represents that splendid type of young American manhood which had drawn attention by its capacity for accomplishment. Though most of his life had been spent in the Middle West, he was born in West Virginia, and his ancestors had lived there for several generations. He was born on a farm in Hampshire County, July 14, 1875, a son of John William and Hannah Catherine (Timbrook) Davis. His paternal grandfather, Eli Davia, was born in what is now Hardy County, West Virginia, then Old Virginia. He married a Miss Evans. Gipson P. Timbrook, the maternal grandfather, married a Miss Hott. John W. Davis was born in Hardy County, West Virginia, May 26, 1851, while his wife was born in Hampshire County, July 12, 1854. Both parenta are still living, residents of Shawnee County, Kansas, removing there from Carroll County, Missouri, in November, 1915, and they naturally take much pride in the accomplishments of their son. When William E. Davis was nine years old, his parents moved to Carroll County, Missouri, and he grew up there on a farm. The limited advantages of the country schools he supplemented by attendance at Avalon College in Livingston County, Missouri. Leaving school at the age of twenty he became clerk in the...

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