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Biography of Enos Fitterer

Enos Fitterer was born in Baden, Germany, July 28, 1835, and lived in his native land until 1846, when his parents emigrated to America. They settled on a farm in Butler county, Ohio, and there the subject of this sketch lived and grew to manhood. In 1856 he went to Hamilton, Ohio, to learn the baker’s trade with Messrs. Nutts & Sivers, remained with them some fifteen months, and then located in Carthage, Hancock county, Illinois, where he established himself in the bakery business and carried it on until 1861. In that year he joined the Union army, enlisting in. Company B, Thirty-second Illinois Volunteer Infantry, and served during the war, participating in the battles of Pittsburgh Landing, Hatchie River, and numerous skirmishes; and was with Sherman in his famous “March through Georgia, from Atlanta to the sea.” He was mustered out of the service at Leavenworth, Kansas, in September, 1865, and received his honorable discharge at Springfield, Illinois. From Springfield he went to Trenton, Missouri, the following November, and there, in connection with C. A. Hoffman, opened a bakery and grocery establishment, under the firm name of Hoffman & Fitterer. This firm continued business until 1867, when Mr. Hoffman retired, and Mr. Fitterer continued to carry on the business until 1873, when his brother became associated with him, under the name and style of Fitterer & Bro., and they remained in partnership until the following fall, then sold out to Messrs. Hyde & Crandall. He was employed working at his trade from that time until 1877, when he removed to Gallatin and established himself in the bakery and...

Slave Narrative of Peter Bruner

Interviewer: Evelyn McLemore Person Interviewed: Peter Bruner Date of Interview: 1936 Location: Kentucky Place of Birth: Winchester, Kentucky, Clark Co. Date of Birth: 1845 ESTILL CO. (Evelyn McLemore) Story of Peter Bruner, a former slave: Peter Bruner, was born in Winchester, Kentucky, Clark Co., in 1845. His master was John Bell Bruner, who at that time treated him fairly well. When Peter was 10 years of age his master brought him and his sister to Irvine. After arriving in Irvine, Peter’s master was very cruel to him. They got only cornbread, fat meat and water to eat. If his master’s hunger was not satisfied, he would even take this little from them. The[TR:?] were tables to eat from. Once Peter, was taken into his master’s house to nurse the children and was made to sleep on the floor with only a ragged quilt to lie on and one thin one over him. Often he was whipped because his mistress said the washing was not clean, when it was. On one occasion when he was beaten his master took a piece of sole leather about 1 foot long and 2 inches wide, cut it full of holes and dipped it in water that was brined. He then took the leather and lashed the poor slave’s back. Joe Bruner, was a better master to his slaves than John. Once when Peter stole some sugar and flour, that he and his sister might have a pound cake, Joe caught him. He did not whip him however, because he knew that Peter did not often have enough to eat. Peter, endured torture as...

Biography of Chester Stevens

Chester Stevens, representing a pioneer family in Montgomery County, had been an active factor in local affairs and in the legal profession for the past ten years. He is now serving as county auditor, and also enjoys some influential and profitable connections as a lawyer with offices in Independence. Some of his ancestors fought in the American Revolution, and the Stevens family came from England and settled in New York in colonial times. His grandfather, Chauncey Stevens, was born in New York, and went as a pioneer to the State of Indiana, where he followed farming until his death. Chester Stevens was born in Montgomery County, Kansas, September 15, 1882. His father, R. E. Stevens, came to Montgomery County, Kansas, in 1870. At that time the Town of Independence had hardly been started, and he was closely associated with much of the early life of this then frontier county. For about twelve years he engaged in the freighting business, before railroads were built, from Montgomery County to Fort Scott and Sedan. He spent his last years on a farm near Elk City, and his farm of eighty acres is still owned by his widow. He was born in the State of Indiana not far from Hamilton, Ohio, grew up in Indiana, but was married across the line in Ohio. He died at Elk City, Kansas, April 10, 1885. He was a republican and an active member of the Methodist Church. The maiden name of his wife was Margaret Blackford, who was born in Butler County, Ohio, in 1844, and since July 16, 1903, she had lived in Elk City....

Biographical Sketch of William L. Blair

Blair, William L.; railroad business; born, Hamilton, O., Dec. 27, 1858; son of William Henry and Angeline Linn Blair; educated, High School, Hamilton, O.; married, Hamilton, O., November, 1908, Ella Brant Elliott; member Troop A, O. N. G., 1886 to 1897; entered the employ Cincinnati, Hamilton & Dayton R. R., as telegraph operator, in December, 1872; telegraph operator, train dispatcher and clerk until September, 1880; with N. Y., C. & St. L. R. R. Co. September, 1881, to September, 1893; chief clerk and gen. mgr. September, 1893, to March, 1901; supt. Eastern Division, March, 1901, to October, 1905; supt. Telegraph, October, 1905, to October, 1906; supt. Eastern Division, October, 1906, to June, 1912; supt. transportation, June, 1912, to date; asst. to gen. mgr.; member Athletic...

Biography of Casius M. Gay

Casius M. Gay, who is now serving his third term as sheriff of Sequoyah county, is one of the prominent citizens of Sallisaw. He is a southerner by birth, born near Jacksontown, Leslie county, Kentucky, on the 5th of February, 1889, a son of Henry and Arkie (Davidson) Gay, both natives of that state, who are now deceased. The Gay family located in Kentucky prior to the Civil war and was one of the well known families of that state. To the union of Mr. and Mrs. Gay five sons and one daughter were born, Casius M. being the second youngest child. In the acquirement of an education Casius M. Gay attended the public schools of Kentucky and after putting his textbooks aside determined to learn the machinist’s trade. Removing to Hamilton, Ohio, he remained there for three years in connection with the Champing Costing Pipe Mill and Long & Alstetter Machine Shop, at the termination of which time he completed his apprenticeship. Two years later he returned to his home in Kentucky, where he remained for a short time and then came to Sailisaw, on the 12th of June, 1906. Four years he spent in the logging and lumber business and then left Sallisaw for a trip to all the important cities in the United States. In 1912 he returned here and subsequently took up farming, becoming one of the representative agriculturists in this part of the state. About three years later he entered politics, taking over the office of sheriff of Sequoyah county on the 1st of January, 1915, for a two-year term. The election of that...

Biography of Hon. John McGlynn

HON. JOHN McGLYNN. – This influential resident and proprietor of the well-known hotel that bears his name in La Conner, Washington, and whose portrait appears in this history, is a man fitted by nature with qualities that insure success, and which are held in especial esteem among men. With manners suave, a disposition to accommodate, and generous promptings towards his fellows, he greets the stranger, the customer of the friend in a manner indicating the kindness of his own feelings, and which seldom fails to leave with the recipient a desire to do a favor. This is a happy faculty and gives it possessor a respect and friendship among men that is bounded only by the extent of his acquaintance. Mr. McGlynn is a native of the province of Connaught, Ireland, and first saw the light of day May 10, 1845, and is the son of Patrick and Catherine Juckein McGlynn. When he was some seven years of age he came with his parents from that unhappy island to the United States, and located at Hamilton, Ohio, and three years later moved to Carroll county, Indiana, where he was educated and employed on his father’s farm until 1872. In that year he concluded to come West, and selected Washington Territory as his future home. Shortly after his arrival he was appointed in this territory as Indian agent for the Lumni Reservation, a position which he held for five years. He was then appointed to the same position on the Swinomish Reservation, and held the position until his removal by the Cleveland administration, being in politics a strong and consistent...

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