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North America Indian Names of Places in Mississippi, Alabama, Georgia, Florida, and Louisiana

The Indians all over this continent had names, traditions, religions, ceremonies, feasts, prayers, songs, dances all, more or less, with symbolism and allegory, adapted to circumstances, just as all other races of mankind. But the world has become so familiar with the continued and ridiculous publications in regard to everything touching upon that race of people that a universal doubt has long since been created and established as to the possibility of refinement of thought and nobleness of action ever having existed among the North American Indian race, ancient or modern; and so little of truth has also been learned regarding the real and true inner life of that peculiar and seemingly isolated race of mankind, that today only here and there can one be found who, from a lifetime association and intimate acquaintance, is well versed in Indian thought, feeling and character, and able to unfold and record the solution of that imagined mystery known as “The Indian Problem,” since they learned it from the Indians themselves. From the Indians own lips they were taught its elucidation, and only as it could be taught and learned, but never again can be taught and learned. Even as various nations of antiquity of, the eastern continent have left the evidences of their former occupation by the geographical names that still exist, so to have the North American Indians left their evidences upon the western (in dependent of all written history) that they have likewise possessed this continent during unknown ages of the past. The artificial mounds, fortifications, lakes and ponds with their original names and those of rivers, creeks, mountains,...

Biography of Dr. Nathaniel Polhill Jelks

Dr. Nathaniel Polhill Jelks, fourth son of James Oliver Jelks and Mary Polhill, was born July 18, 1845, in Hawkinsville, Pulaski County, Georgia, where he died March 28, 1911. When six years old his family moved to Oglethorpe, Georgia, after two years moving to Hamilton County, Florida, where he received his early education, later studying in Augusta, Georgia. In 1863 he entered the Confederate Army, enlisting in Company I, Second Florida Cavalry, under General Jones, a gallant command guarding the interior of the State. He was wounded at the Battle of Natural Bridge, Florida, March 6, 1865, in which the enemy was defeated. After the Confederates laid down their arms, he surrendered with his command at Baldwin, Fla. When peace came again to the land, he entered upon the study of medicine, and was graduated at Bellevue Hospital Medical College, New York, in 1868. He immediately began the practice of medicine in Hawkinsville, Ga. In this profession he gained distinction and success, was a member of the Georgia Medical Association, and at one time president of the South Georgia Medical Association. As a physician he was devoted to his profession, and no one ever lived up to its high code of ethics more closely than he, not swerving from them in the remotest degree. In addition to his profession he was for many years connected with the drug business, and was one of the leading planters of the county. He was active in civic matters, serving his people whenever and wherever he could. He was one of the earliest members of the board of education that established our present system...

Slave Narrative of Douglas Dorsey

Interviewer: James Johnson Person Interviewed: Douglas Dorsey Location: South Jacksonville, Florida Age: 86 In South Jacksonville, on the Spring Glen Road lives Douglas Dorsey, an ex-slave, born in Suwannee County, Florida in 1851, fourteen years prior to freedom. His parents Charlie and Anna Dorsey were natives of Maryland and free people. In those days, Dorsey relates there were people known as “Nigger Traders” who used any subterfuge to catch Negroes and sell them into slavery. There was one Jeff Davis who was known as a professional “Nigger Trader,” his slave boat docked in the slip at Maryland and Jeff Davis and his henchmen went out looking for their victims. Unfortunately, his mother Anna and his father were caught one night and were bound and gagged and taken to Jeff Davis’ boat which was waiting in the harbor, and there they were put into stocks. The boat stayed in port until it was loaded with Negroes, then sailed for Florida where Davis disposed of his human cargo. Douglas Dorsey’s parents were sold to Colonel Louis Matair, who had a large plantation that was cultivated by 85 slaves. Colonel Matair’s house was of the pretentious southern colonial type which was quite prevalent during that period. The colonel had won his title because of his participation in the Indian War in Florida. He was the typical wealthy southern gentleman, and was very kind to his slaves. His wife, however was just the opposite. She was exceedingly mean and could easily be termed a tyrant. There were several children in the Matair family and their home and plantation were located in Suwannee County,...

Slave Narrative of Clayborn Gantling

Interviewer: Rachel Austin Person Interviewed: Clayborn Gantling Location: Jacksonville, Florida Age: 89 Clayborn Gantling was born in Dawson, Georgia, Terrell County, January 20, 1848 on the plantation of Judge Williams. Judge Williams owned 102 heads of slaves and was known to be “tolable nice to ’em in some way and pretty rough on ’em in other ways” says Mr. Gantling. “He would’nt gi’ us no coffee, ‘cept on Sunday Mornings when we would have shorts or seconds of wheat, which is de leavins’ of flour at mills, yu’ know, but we had plenty bacon, corn bread, taters and peas. “As a child I uster have to tote water to de old people on de farm and tend de cows an’ feed de sheep. Now, I can’ say right ‘zackly how things wuz during slavery ’cause its been a long time ago but we had cotton and corn fields and de hands plowed hard, picked cotton grabbled penders, gathered peas and done all the other hard work to be done on de plantations. I wuz not big ’nuff to do all of dem things but I seed plenty of it done. “Dey made lye soap on de farms and used indigo from wood for dye. We niggers slept on hay piled on top of planks but de white folks had better beds. “I don’t ‘member my grandparents but my mas was called Harriet Williams and my pa was called Henry Williams; dey wuz called Williams after my master. My mas and pa worked very hard and got some beatings but I don’t know what for. Dey wuz all kinds of...

Hamilton County Florida Cemetery Records

Florida Cemetery records are listed by county then name of cemetery within the Florida county. Most of these are complete indices at the time of transcription, however, in some cases we list the listing when it is only a partial listing.  Hamilton County Cemetery Records Hosted at Hamilton County Florida USGenWeb WPA Veterans Interred in Hamilton County, Florida Hamilton County Cemetery Records Hosted at Hamilton County, Florida USGenWeb Archives Akins Cemetery Antioch Cemetery Bellflower Cemetery Bell-Tuten-Moody Cemetery Bellville Methodist Cemetery Blair Cemetery Byrd Cemetery Clardy Cemetery Concord Cemetery Mitchell Cemetery Mt. Pleasant Cemetery Nunn Cemetery Prospect Primitive Baptist Church Cemetery, Partial listing Prospect Primitive Baptist Church Cemetery Sasser’s Landing...

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