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Native American History of Habersham County, Georgia

Habersham County is located in the northeastern tip of Georgia. The Blue Ridge Mountain Range runs along its northwestern corner. The Chattahoochee River flows through the length of the county. All the famous poem by Sydney Lanier, “The Song of the Chattahoochee” opens with the phrase, “Out of the hills of Habersham, down through the valleys of Hall,” the river actually begins at Unicoi Gap, just north of Helen, GA in White County. Habersham also contains much of Tallulah Gorge, a 1000+ feet deep canyon formed in the Brevard Fault by the Tallulah River. Although most popular literature describes the aboriginal occupants of Habersham as being Cherokee, they were not. Some non-Cherokee Native Peoples in the northern part of the county became briefly associated with the Cherokee Alliance after the American Revolution, but the entire county east of the Chattahoochee and roughly south of present day Clarkesville, was always Creek territory, until seized by the State of Georgia in 1784. This illegal land acquisition will be explained later. Alpine conditions and volcanic activity No fossils of dinosaurs or early mammals have been discovered in the Habersham County or surrounding region. Paleontologists explain their absence by geological conditions of that era. The Blue Ridge Mountains were a young mountain range during the millions of years that were similar in height to the Rockies, or even the Himalayas. It is theorized that alpine conditions were inhospitable to reptiles and amphibians. Recent discovery of dinosaur fossils in Antarctica and the southern tip of South America challenge that theory. A more likely threat to animal life would have been a chain of volcanoes...

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