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Biography of Dr. Leonidas Kirby

In performing the arduous labors of the general medical practitioner,¬†Dr. Leonidas Kirby has been very conscientious in the discharge of his professional duties, is well up to the times in medical lore, and has the intelligence to properly apply his knowledge. As evidence of his skill and ability to adapt himself to circumstances, when he first commenced the practice of medicine, a child of G. J. Howells accidentally got a grain of corn in its windpipe and was in a dying condition from the same. Dr. Kirby met the father with his child in the street and performed the operation of cutting open the windpipe (tracheotomy), thus saving the child’s life. He has become one of the foremost practitioners of the State, and the people of Boone County, Arkansas, are fortunate in having him as a citizen of their section. The Doctor was born on the Greene and Polk County, Missouri, line December 1, 1850, the eldest child of B. F. and Serena (Bender) Kirby, the former of whom was born in Warren County, Kentucky, about 1828, a son of Tully C. and Nancy C. (Harrington) Kirby. The grandfather was also born in Warren County, November 11, 1802, his parents having been Jesse and Sophia (Choice) Kirby, the former being a Virginian and a son of David and Elizabeth (Torrent) Kirby, Virginians also. The founder of the family came from England and settled in Virginia long before the Revolution. He had three sons, David, Henry and Frank, the first mentioned of whom married in Virginia and became the head of the branch of the Kirby family to which the...

Biography of Ad V. Coppedge

Ad V. Coppedge, the pioneer lawyer of Delaware county and the first county attorney, has also been connected with every important constructive measure that has led to the up building, development and progress of this section of the state. He became a resident of Grove in 1963 and throughout all the intervening period has taken active part in shaping the county’s up building. Mr. Coppedge was born on a farm in Missouri near the Arkansas line, January 26, 1870, the old homestead being situated at Thayer. His parents were Houston Harrison and Tennessee Martha (Bledsoe) Coppedge, and the mother, a native of North Carolina, is still living at Grove, Oklahoma. The father, who was born in Virginia, served under John S. Marmaduke as a Confederate soldier for three years during the Civil war. He was wounded and was paroled at Vicksburg. In early manhood he began teaching and following his marriage he turned his attention to general farming. In 1879 he removed to Dade county, Missouri, where he carried on general agricultural pursuits to the time of his death. His political endorsement was always given to the democratic party and he was, one of the active workers in its ranks. He was also a devoted member of the Methodist Episcopal church, South, and he died in that faith on the 9th of January, 1895, when fifty-two years of age. Ad V. Coppedge, spending his youthful days’ under the parental roof, began his education in the public schools near his father’s home but when a lad of only eleven years he put aside his textbooks for a time and assisted...

Biography of Guy Fountain Nelson

Guy Fountain Nelson, judge of the Third judicial district of Oklahoma, his entire official record reflecting credit and honor upon the people who have honored him, came to Muskogee in 1909. At that time he had had sixteen years’ experience in law practice and had made steady progress to a point where he had left the ranks of the many to stand among the successful. He was born in Nevada, Missouri, August 16, 1872, and is a son of I. F. S. and Alice (Pottorf) Nelson. The father is a traveling salesman, having long devoted his attention to that line of work. Judge Nelson obtained a public and high school education in his native city and afterward attended the Christian University at Nevada, Missouri. He read law under the direction of H. H. Blanton and in 1893 was admitted to the bar. For a year he practiced in Nevada and for a similar period in Greenfield, Missouri, and then removed to Harrison, Arkansas, where he also spent one year. In 1909 he became connected with the law department of the Missouri, Kansas & Texas Railroad at Parsons, Kansas, and so continued until he resigned in 1909 for the purpose of removing to Muskogee. Here he opened an office for the general practice of civil law and was not long in securing a large clientage. In 1916 he was appointed assistant attorney general of Oklahoma, filling the office until the 1st of January, 1918, when he resigned. He was called to the bench through appointment as judge of the superior court of Muskogee and in November, 1914, was¬†elected without opposition...

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