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Tuscarora Indians

Tuscarora Tribe, Tuscarora Confederacy: From their own name Skǎ-ru’-rěn, signifying according to Hewitt (in Hodge, 1910), “hemp gatherers,” and applied on account of the great use they made of Apocynum cannabinum. Also called: Ă-ko-t’ǎs’-kǎ-to’-rěn Mohawk name. Ani’-Skǎlǎ’lǐ, Cherokee name. Ă-t’ǎs-kǎ-lo’-lěn, Oneida name. Tewohomomy (or Keew-ahomomy), Saponi name. Tuscarora Connections. The Tuscarora belonged to the Iroquoian linguistic family. Tuscarora Location. On the Roanoke, Tar, Pamlico, and Neuse Rivers. (See also Pennsylvania and New York.) Tuscarora Subdivisions. The Tuscarora should be considered a confederacy with three tribes or a tribe with three subtribes as follows: Kǎ’tě’nu’ā’kā’, “People of the submerged pine tree”; Akawǎntca’kā’, meaning doubtful; and Skarū’rěn, “hemp gatherers,” i. e., the Tuscarora proper. Tuscarora Villages The following were in North Carolina, a more precise location not being possible except in the cases specified: Annaooka. Chunaneets. Cohunche. Conauhcare. Contahnah, near the mouth of Neuse River. Cotechney, on the opposite side of Neuse River from Fort Barnwell, about the mouth of Contentnea Creek. Coram. Corutra. Harooka. Harutawaqui. Kenta. Kentanuska. Naurheghne. Neoheroka, in Greene County. Nonawharitse. Nursoorooka. Oonossoora. Tasqui, a day’s journey from Cotechney on the way to Nottaway village. Tonarooka, on a branch of Neuse River between “Fort Narhantes” and Cotechney. Torhunte, on a northern affluent of Neuse River. Tosneoc. Ucouhnerunt, on Pamlico River, probably in the vicinity of Greenville, in Pitt County. Unanauhan. Later settlements in New York were these: Canasaraga, on Canaseraga Creek on the site of the present Sullivan. Ganatisgowa Ingaren. Junastriyo. Jutaneaga. Kanhats. Kaunehsuntahkeh. Nyuchirhaan, near Lewiston, Niagara County. Ohagi, on the west side of Genesee River a short distance below Cuylersviile, Livingston County. Oquaga, on the east...

Woccon Indians

Woccon Tribe: Significance unknown. Woccon Connections. The Woccon belonged to the Siouan linguistic stock, their closest relations being the Catawba. Woccon Location. Between Neuse River and one of its affluents, perhaps about the present Goldsboro, Wayne County. Woccon Villages Tooptatmeer, supposed to have been in Greene County. Yupwauremau, supposed to have been in Greene County. Woccon History.-The first mention of the Woccon appears to be by Lawson writing about 1701, who recorded 150 words of their language. These show that it was nearer Catawba than any other known variety of speech. Lack of any earlier mention of such a large tribe lends strength to the theory of Dr. Douglas L. Rights that they were originally Waccamaw (see South Carolina). They took part against the Whites in the Tuscarora Wars and were probably extinguished as a tribe at that time, the remnant fleeing north with the Tuscarora, uniting with the Catawba, or combining with other Siouan remnants in the people later known as Croatan. Woccon Population. The number of Woccon war estimated by Mooney (1928) at 600 in 1600. Lawson (1860) gives 120 warriors in 1709. Connection in which they have become noted. The sole claim of the Woccon to distinction is from the fact that it is the only one of the southern group of eastern Siouan tribes other than the Catawba from which a vocabulary has been...

Guy V. Lassiter

Corpl., Supply Tr., Co. F, 105th Regt., 30th Div. Born in Greene County; the son of Mr. and Mrs. T. N. Lassiter. Husband of Genivieve Lassiter. Entered service Sept. 28, 1917, at Snow Hill, N.C. Was sent to Camp Jackson; transferred to Camp Sevier. Sailed for France May 11, 1918. Returned to USA April 11, 1919, and was mustered out at Camp Jackson, S. C., April 14,...

Jesse F. Harper, Jr.

Sergt., Inf., Co. F, 81st Div., 322nd Regt. Born in Greene County May 19, 1893; son of Mr. and Mrs. J. F. Harper. Entered service Sept. 7, 1917, at Snow Hill, N.C. Was sent to Camp Jackson, S. C., from there to Camp Sevier Oct., 1918. Sailed for France Aug. 20, 1918. Fought in all engagements of 81st Div. Mustered out at Camp Lee, Va., June 26,...

The Woccon, Sissipahaw, Cape Fear, and Warren-Nuncock Indians

Of the North Carolina tribes bearing the foregoing names almost nothing is known, and of the last two even the proper names have not been recorded. The Woccon were Siouan; the Saxapahaw and Cape Fear Indians presumably were Siouan, as indicated from their associations and alliances with known Siouan tribes, while the Warren-nuncock were probably some people better known under another name, though they cannot be identified. The region between the Yadkin and the Neuse, extending down to the coast, was probably occupied by still other tribes whose very names are forgotten. They were virtually exterminated by smallpox and other diseases long before the colonization of this region in the middle of the eighteenth century, and probably even before the Yamasi war of 1715 disrupted the smaller tribes. About all that is known of the Woccon was recorded by Lawson, who states that about 1710 they lived not more than two leagues from the Tuskarora (who occupied the lower Neuse and its tributaries), and had two villages, Yupwauremau and Tooptatmeer (p. 383), with 120 warriors, which would indicate a population of 500 or 600 souls. This was by far a larger population at that period than any other of the eastern Carolina tribes excepting the Tuskarora. He gives a vocabulary of about 150 words, which shows that their dialect was closely related to that of the Catawba, although the two tribes were separated by nearly 200 miles1 . His map of 1709, reproduced by Hawks, places the Woccon between the main Neuse and one of its tributaries, perhaps about the present Goldsboro in Wayne county or Snow Hill in...

Greene County, North Carolina Cemetery Transcriptions

North Carolina Cemetery records are listed by county then name of cemetery within the North Carolina county. Most of these are complete indices at the time of transcription, however, in some cases we list the listing when it is only a partial listing. Following Cemeteries (hosted at Greene County, North Carolina Tombstone Transcription Project) Aldridge Cemetery Bailey-Mercer Cemetery Barfied-Harrison Cemetery Beaman Cemetery Beaman-Craft Cemetery Brand-Brann Cemetery Burch Cemetery Carr Cemetery Cox Cemetery Andrew Craft Cemetery Darden-Cooley-Speight Cemetery Dawson Cemetery Dildy-Beamon Cemetery Fields Cemetery #1 Fields Cemetery #2 Gay Cemetery Gay-Slater Cemetery Harrel’s Chapel Cemetery Harrison Cemetery #1 Harrison Cemetery #2 Hinson Cemetery #1 Hinson Cemetery #2 Hull Road Cemetery Hull Road Church Cemetery (new) Hull Road Church Cemetery (old) Jones Cemetery Abner McKeel Cemetery Mewborn Cemetery New Vick Cemetery Old McKeel Cemetery Old Shackelford Cemetery Patrick Cemetery Ruff Cemetery Shirley Family Cemetery Sugg Cemetery Tabernacle Methodist Church Cemetery Taylor-Newell Cemetery Thorne Cemetery #1 Thorne Cemetery #2 Vines Cemetery Walston Cemetery Walstonburg Cemetery Wells-Watson-Shackelford Cemetery...

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