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Peace Attempts with Western Prairie Indians, 1833

What was known as the Treaty of Dancing Rabbit Creek was entered into in Mississippi with the Choctaw Indians September 27, 1830;1 pursuant to the terms of the treaty, in 1832 the movement of the Choctaw to their new home between the Canadian and Red rivers was under way but they were in danger from incursions of the Comanche and Pani Picts2 or Wichita, and the Kiowa tribe, who came east as far as the Washita and Blue rivers; these Indians had also evinced a hostile attitude toward white citizens and had attacked and plundered Santa Fe traders, trappers, and other unprotected travelers. A party of twelve traders had left Santa Fe in December, 1832, under Judge Carr of Saint Louis for their homes in Missouri. Their baggage and about ten thousand dollars in specie were packed upon mules. They were descending the Canadian River when, near the present town of Lathrop in the Panhandle of Texas, they were attacked by an overwhelming force of Comanche and Kiowa Indians. Two of the men, one named Pratt, and the other Mitchell, were killed; and after a siege of thirty-six hours the survivors made their escape at night on foot, leaving all their property in possession of the Indians. The party became separated and after incredible hardship and suffering five of them made their way to the Creek settlements on the Arkansas and to Fort Gibson where they found succor. Of the other five only two survived. The money secured by the Indians was the first they had ever seen.3 Colonel Arbuckle on May 6, ordered4 a military force to Red...

History of Greene County Missouri

What is now known as southwest Missouri, substantially Greene County as organized in 1833, was formerly known as the Osage Country, being the home of the Indian tribe for which it was named. After the War of 1812 the Kickapoos made villages on the Pomme de Terre River, and near the present site of Springfield, leaving their name in that of Kickapoo Prairie, south of that place. The history of the region is peculiarly interesting as that of one of the most important purely American settlements made in the State. This dataset contains numerous biographies of leading citizens of Greene County during the 19th century – these biographies provide a biographical narrative to the history of Greene County Missouri.

Biography of Mrs. F. B. Fite

(See Grant)-Julia Theresa, daughter of William Columbus and Jane (Davis) Patton was born December 29, 1867 in Walker County, Georgia. Educated at Drury College, Springfield, Missouri, and Vassar College. She married at Vinita November 13, 1889 Francis Bartow, son of H. W. and Sarah (Denman) Fite, born October 17, 1861 in Bartow County, Georgia. He graduated in 1886 from the Southern Medical College at Atlanta, Georgia, having received the medal for highest efficiency in his class. He is a leader in Oklahoma in surgery and civic progress. Dr. and Mrs. Fite, whose home is in Muskogee, are the parents of William Patton, born August 31, 1890; Frances, born September 24, 1893, Francis Bartow, born December 20, 1895; Edward Halsell, born December 27, 1898 and Julian Bixby Fite, born September 30, 1906. William Patton Fite graduated from Shattuck Military School, Faribault, Minnesota, from University of Virginia in1913 with the A. B, degree and in 1916 from the Medical Department. He Married June 1, 1918 Miss Maurine Mitchell of Fort Worth, Texas. Their daughter Jane Fife was born October 7, 1920. He served in the World War as Captain in the Medical Corps 36th Division. Is now practicing surgery in partnership with his father at Muskogee. Francis Fite graduated from Vassar College in 1916. Married July 7, 1920, Hubert Ambrister, an attorney in Oklahoma City. Francis Bartow Fite Jr. graduated from Shattuck Military School, from University of Virginia in 1920 with honors in the A. B. degree and is in the 1922 law class of that institution. He served on the staff of Aide de camp to Major General Sturgis, 80th...

Biographical Sketch of Nellie K. Ross

(See Grant, Sanders, Ross and Ghigau)—Nellie Katherine McLeod, born February 8, 1872 at Tahlequah. Educated in the Cherokee Public Schools, Female Seminary and Drury College, Springfield, Missouri. She married April 26, 1891 George Starr Ross, born June 27, 1865. He was educated in the Cherokee National Schools and Male Seminary. He died November 24, 1894. They were the parents of Wayne McLeod born February 27, 1892 and Roy Vivian Ross, born January 15, 1894 and died October 9, 1920. Mrs. Ross Cherokee name is Lyuka. She is a Presbyterian and a member of the Quest Club. Wayne McLeod Ross is a book-keeper in the Farmers Bank and Trust Company at Claremore. Mrs. Ross’ parents were: Murdock McLeod, born January 28, 1834 at Cape John, Picton County, Nova Scotia, he married February 10, 1868 Annie Henry Brown, born August 5, 1851 at Tahlequah. She died December 31, 1873 and he died May 18,...

Biographical Sketch of Mrs. Callie Elliott

Elliott, Mrs. Callie (See Foreman)—Callie, daughter of Samuel and Annie (Edwards) Whatenberger, born March 15, 1868, in Springfield, Mo. Educated in Texas. Married at Vinita Jan. 7, 1892, Hiram Thompson Elliott, son of Archibald and Rachel (Smith) Elliott, born May 22, 1858. They were the parents of Hiram Thompson Elliott, Jr., born November 26, 1892; Samuel Talbert, born July 5th, 1894, married Genevieve Blackford, Vera May, born February 26, 1896, married Guy L. Jones, and has one son, Raymond Jones, born April 4, 1914; Lucullus, born August 25, 1899, is in the United States Marine Corps in Haiti; Lucien Bell, born July 27, 1901; Flossie, born Jan. 2, 1904; Ruth, born May 24, 1905; Robert, born August 21, 1910, and Glenn, born March 6, 1913. Mr. Elliott died July 1,...

Biography of Adrian D. Nichols, D. O.

The school of osteopathy has a worthy representative in Adrian D. Nichols, who is a successful practitioner of St. Louis, and since his graduation from the Kirksville School of Osteopathy has practiced in this city. He was born on a farm near Nashville, Illinois, April 17, 1870, and is a son of David William and Tabitha (Ballard) Nichols. The father, a native of the state of New York, was born in what was then known as Bath Village but is now the city of Syracuse. He was a son of William Nichols who came to America from Scotland in early life. David W. Nichols was born in 1832 and pursued his education in the schools of Michigan, to which state his parents removed when he was quite young. Later the family home was established at Quincy, Illinois, where he was residing at the time of the outbreak of the Civil war. Upon President Lincoln’s call to arms he was one of the first to enlist, joining Major Wood’s One Hundred Day Men. The commander later turned his troops over to the Mulligan Brigade at Lexington. They were exchanged as prisoners of war at Jefferson Barracks, after being kept there for a time. They were paroled and discharged at Hannibal, Missouri. Later Mr. Nichols joined the forces of General Curtis at Pea Ridge, Arkansas, and at Corinth joined the troops under General Dodge as a scout, serving in that capacity until the close of the war. He was then invalided and sent to Cairo, Illinois, for he was a member of the Fiftieth Illinois Regiment and claimed Cairo as his...

Biography of Charles F. Debrunner

Charles F. Debrunner is local manager of the United Iron Works Company’s plant at Independence. He is a young man, but his business career covers all the years since he was about fifteen or sixteen, and had been identified almost entirely with one line of manufacturing. He is one of the live and enterprising young men who have been attracted to this important industrial center in Southern Kansas, and had made his influence felt in its business and civic circles. He was born at Billings, Christian County, Missouri, May 16, 1882. His father, Frederick DeBrunner, was born in 1839 in Switzerland. The grandfather, who was of French descent, spent his life as a farmer in Switzerland. Frederick DeBrunner came to this country when a young man, lived and worked for two years in Chicago, and then returned to Switzerland where he married Mary Werder, who was born in that country in 1842 and is now living at Billings, Missouri. He brought his bride to America and for ten years was in the grocery business at Sigourney, Iowa. In 1879 he removed to Billings, Missouri, and remained an active merchant there until his death in 1906. While at Billings he served as city clerk for ten years, was an active democrat, and was a member of the German Evangelical Church, in which he seryed as deacon several years. He was also affiliated with the Independent Order of Odd Fellows. The children were: Ida, wife of Henry Scholz, a retired farmer at Billings, Missouri; Clara, who lives at Billings, the widow of Ward Combs, who was principal of schools; Bertha, wife...

Biography of John Ross Newman

In the large metropolitan cities are found a number of men who are able to confine themselves exclusively to some one specialty in medicine or surgery, but in the smaller cities, however much a professional man may incline to specialization, he is almost invariably engaged in general practice. An exception to this rule is the case of Dr. John Ross Newman of Fort Scott. Doctor Newman is a surgeon of rare attainments and ability. For the past six years he had handled only surgical cases. He is one of the very few men in the entire state who can be properly designated as surgeon without implying that they also handle general medical cases. The character and abilities which have since matured into professional fame were developed while Doctor Newman lived on a Missouri farm. He grew up in the country, was graduated from the Lockwood (Missouri) High School in 1901, and afterwards entered the Central Medical College of St. Joseph, Missouri, where he was graduated in 1905. In that year he came to Fort Scott, practiced general medicine for six months, and then returned to Lockwood, Missouri, where he continued in the same line of practice until 1908. His early experiences as a physician were such as to confirm his ambition and desire for surgery. On leaving Lockwood in 1908, it was with a determination to make a special study of surgery, and the two following years he spent in the clinics of some of the greatest hospitals of Chicago, Philadelphia and New York, and for a time served as assistant surgeon in one of these hospitals. With this...

Biography of William L. Clark

Among the successful business men of Harney county is to be mentioned the gentleman named above, whose well known establishment of general merchandise at Lawen, where he has done business for some time, is one of the prosperous business houses of the county; and in addition to handling this, Mr. Clark has a hay farm of one hundred and sixty acres, which he attends to and also raises cattle, and also he has been a mail contractor of the interior of Oregon. William L. was born in Carroll county, Indiana, on April 3, 1845, being the son of Thomas and Ann (Davidson) Clark. In the spring of 1853, the father started across the plains with his family in an ox train from Carroll county, Indiana. They made the trip successfully, but the last six weeks they had to live on the flesh of the oxen they killed, without even the luxury of salt. Fresh meat with water for six weeks is not so pleasant as might be imagined. They came through the Harney valley and settled in Lane county, near Eugene. The remaining oxen ate poison weeds in the valley and all died. The father took a donation claim, and, being a miller, wrought at his trade in Eugene as well as handled his farm. He died in Eugene in December, 1896, and the mother died in 1899. On April 6, 1865, William L. enlisted in Company K, First Oregon Volunteers, under Captain A. B. Ingraham, to fight the Piutes and the Snake Indians. He was in one battle on the middle fork of the Malheur and one on...

Biography of Marion C. Early

Marion C. Early is the son of George G. and Mary A. Early. His father, George G. Early, was born near Norfolk, Virginia, July 13, 1819, and while still a boy removed with his mother to Knox county, Tennessee. His mother, Mary A. (Brittain) Early, was born near Lenoir City, London county, Tennessee, February 23, 1827. His parents later removed to Polk county, Missouri, where on a farm the subject of this sketch was reared. In a log schoolhouse there was held each year a four months’ term of school and this he attended until past nineteen, when he entered the Southern Baptist College at Boliver, Polk county, Missouri, which he attended one year; thereafter he entered the preparatory department of Drury College, Springfield, Missouri, which institution he attended for several years but did not graduate. While attending college he earned his own way. In 1892 he entered the law department of Washington University, St. Louis, and while pursuing the law course he earned all his expenses by working in the law library. June 14, 1894, he was graduated with the degree of LL. B. and on June 18, 1894, was admitted to the bar in St. Louis and immediately entered the law office of Kehr & Tittmann, Wainwright building, St. Louis. In the same building since that date and without interruption he has devoted his whole time to the active practice. Soon after his admission to the bar he was engaged to assist Judge Seymour D. Thompson in the preparation of his work on the law of negligence; in 1900, through the recommendation of Judge Thompson, he was...
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