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Biography of Horace Childs

Horace Childs, a pioneer railroad bridge builder in New England, is a prominent resident of Henniker, Merrimack County, N.H. He was born in this town, August 10, 1807, son of Solomon, Jr., and Mary (Long) Childs. He is a lineal descendant of William Childs or Child, a brother of Ephraim Child, who emigrated from England, and settled in Watertown, Mass., in 1630. The family, which was a notable one in England, sustained the dignity of a coat of arms. William Child was made a freeman at Watertown in 1634, and became a landowner there. His son John was conspicuous in the public affairs of Watertown. He died at the age of forty years. The third in this line was John Childs, Jr., son of John and Mary (Warren) Child; and the fourth, his son Jonathan, born in Watertown in 1696, who settled in Grafton, Mass., where he died in 1787, in the ninety-second year of his age. From the “Genealogy of the Child, Childs, and Childe Families,” by Elias Child, published in 1881, chapter viii., relating to the Watertown branch, we learn that Jonathan Child married in 1729 Abigail Parker, and had eight children, the eldest, Josiah, born in 1730, the youngest, Joseph, born in 1753. Ruth, born in 1740, and the sixth, Solomon, born January 31, 1744. The same record of Jonathan Child’s family is in the History of Grafton, Mass., except that the year of the birth of Solomon is there given as 1743. The History of Henniker names Solomon as the “son of Josiah and Ruth Childs .” If the foregoing record be correct, he was...

Biography of Hon. George W. Tibbitts

HON. GEORGE W. TIBBITTS. – A portrait of Mr. Tibbitts is placed among the illustrations of this history. He was born in Acton, Maine, January 22, 1845, and is the son of Daniel and Mary (Witham) Tibbitts, and was the youngest in a family of fifteen children. When our subject was but one year of age, the family suffered the irreparable loss of their mother; and at the age of four years George was placed with an aunt in West Milton, New Hampshire, with whom he remained until he was fifteen years of age. He then went to Great Falls, in the same state, to do for himself. July 12, 1861, being then but sixteen years of age, he enlisted in Company F, Fourth New Hampshire Infantry, with which he served for three years. On the expiration of that time he re-enlisted in the same company and regiment, during which time he attained the rank of orderly sergeant. Mr. Tibbitts during his army life suffered the privations and hardships that caused thousands of the brave boys to succumb. On August 15, 1864, at the battle of Deep Bottom, he with thirty-eight of his company was taken prisoner and incarcerated in Libby Prison. One month later they were transferred tot he famous Belle Isle, where he remained until October, 1864. They were then sent to Saulsbury, South Carolina, where Mr. Tibbitts remained until March 14, 1865, when he was returned again to Libby Prison, from which he was paroled in the latter part of March, 1865. In June, 1865, owing to a broken constitution caused by his long imprisonment, he...

Biography of Hon. H. A. Neal

Hon. H. A. Neal, attorney at law, Charleston; is a native of’ New Hampshire; he was born in Tuftonborough, Carroll Co., Dec. 13, 1846; he was raised on a farm until he was ten years of age, and then his parents removed to Great Falls, N. H.; he attended the public schools of that city until 1863, when the family returned to the farm; in the fall of 1864, he entered the army as a member of Co. K, 18t N. H. Heavy Artillery, and served till the close of the war; on his return, he attended one term in the Academy at Effingham, N. H., and the following winter taught a country school; in the spring of 1866, he went to Poughkeepsie, N. Y., and pursued a commercial course of study in Eastman’s Business College, where he graduated in September following; he at once came West, and engaged in teaching in Coles Co.; the next year, he became Principal of the Grammar School in. Paris, and, in 1868, went to Watseka, Iroquois Co., Ill., where he had charge of the public schools for three years; the winters of 1871 and 1872, he spent in the law department of the University of Michigan, at Ann Arbor, reading during vacations in the office of Wiley & Parker, in Charleston; he was admitted to the bar in June, 1873, and began practice in Charleston; in 1.875, he entered into partnership with Messrs. Wiley & Parker, the firm becoming Wiley. Parker & Neal; in 1876, Mr. Parker moved to St. Louis, since which time the firm has been Wiley & Neal. He...

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