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Biography of David M. Currier, M.D.

David M. Currier, M.D., a successful physician of Newport, was born in Grafton, Grafton County, September 15, 1840, son of David and Rhoda (Morse) Currier. The grandfather, David Currier, presumably came from Salisbury, Mass., and located in Canaan, where he became the owner of a good tract of land, and died at the age of seventy-one years. He married February 2, 1797, Ruth Stevens, David, born February 8, 1803; Edward, born June 12, 1805; Aaron, born September 10, 1813; Dorothy, born January 28, 1799; and Hannah, born June 23, 1800. David, the father of Dr. Currier, was also a farmer. His active life was spent in Canaan and in Grafton. At a later date he moved to the farm, where he died July 2, 1862. His death resulted from injuries from the fall of a tree upon him while at work in the woods. He married Rhoda Morse, who was born in Enfield in 1807, and died March 31, 1894. He was a Free Will Baptist. In his last years he was a Republican. His children were: Rhoda M., who died when two years old; Amanda M. Hadley, who died sixty years of age; Ruth S. Leeds, who lives in Orange, N.H.; Mary Y. Diamond, also a resident of Orange; David M., the subject of this sketch; and William H. Currier, who is a travelling salesman, residing in South Braintree, Mass. Having received his early education in the schools of Grafton and Sanbornton Bridge (now Tilton ), N.H., David M. Currier went into the McLean Insane Asylum, formerly in Somerville, Mass., as an attendant. Here he began the study...

Biography of Hon. Orvin Kincaid

HON. ORVIN KINCAID. – Mr. Kincaid’s life has embodied very much of the rough romance of an untamed and mining country, and in its entirety would read like a tail of Arabia. He is a native of the granite state, having been born in Grafton, New Hampshire, in 1821. His father, a man of powerful physique, a blacksmith of Scotch-Irish parentage, gave him a training both at school and at the forge, and took the boy with him on his removals to Massachusetts and Vermont. Upon reaching his majority young Kincaid spent eighteen months in Ohio and the old West, but returned to Vermont for a few more years in school. In 1844, together with his father and a brother, he came to Wisconsin, establishing a blacksmith shop at Beloit, and three years later at Portage City, and finished his life in that state as a farmer at Otsego. In 1852 the great impulse that brought so many men to the Pacific seized him also; and joining a train of eighty wagons he journeyed steadily westward, performing an average of twenty-two and one-half miles per day over the old emigrant road. At Soda Springs, near Fort Hall, however, he found it necessary to dispose of his interest in the wagon to which he was attached. Taking a few crackers and dried beef as provisions, and one blanket, he continued the journey on foot, walking nine hundred miles to Placerville. For two years he was mining variously in California, Nevada and New Mexico. His further movements were rapid, and extended over a wide space. In 1856 he was back in...

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