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Biography of Owen Jason Wood

Owen Jason Wood is a lawyer by profession, had been a resident of Topeka since 1890, and for many years had been assistant solicitor for Kansas of The Atchison, Topeka and Santa Fe Railway Company. He gained his first knowledge of life in the world in the northwest corner of Indiana, in Lake County. He was born at Crown Point, the county seat, August 10, 1853. His parents were Martin and Susan G. (Taylor) Wood. His father owned a farm and represented one of the early pioneer families of Northwestern Indians and he was a lawyer by profession, and was in practice at Crown Point from 1848 until 1892. He died in 1892 und his widow is now Living at Topeka with her son Owen J. in her ninetieth year. Martin Wood was considered a man of prominence in Lake County, Indiana, and for two terms represented the county in the Indiana Legislature. His earlier years Owen Jason Wood spent on a farm. That environment was a source of good health and of many associations which he had always prized, but the knowledge of farming gained then be had never put to further use. He attended the graded schools in Crown Point, read law in his father’s office, was admitted to the bar and also attended the law department of Indiana State University. He was graduated in June, 1876, with the degree LL. B. After a brief practice in his native state, Mr. Wood removed to Minnesota, locating at Montevideo, where he practiced law until February, 1886. While in Minnesota he was twice elected county attorney of Chippewa County....

Houses of the Mdewakanton Tribe

When preparing a sketch of the villages and village sites of the Mdewakanton, it is quite natural to begin with a brief description of the site of the village to which Father Hennepin was led captive, during the early spring of the year 1680. On the afternoon of April 11 of that year, while ascending the Mississippi with two companions, he was taken by a war party of the Sioux, and after much anxiety and suffering reached the Falls of St. Anthony, which he so named. Thence, going overland through the endless forests, they arrived at the village of their captors. Soon Indians were seen running from the village to meet them, and then it was that “One of the principal Issati Chiefs gave us his peace-calumet to smoke, and accepted the one we had brought. He then gave us some wild rice to eat, presenting it to us in large bark dishes.” From this place they were later taken in bark canoes “a short league, to an island where their cabins were.”1 The Mdewakanton “mystery lake village,” of the Santee or eastern division of the Dakota, were considered by some as “the only Dakota entitled to the name Isanyati (‘Santee’), given them from their old home on Mille Lac, Minnesota, called by them Isantamde, ‘Knife Lake.'” There is no doubt of the Mdewakanton being the Issati of Hennepin, to whose principal village he was taken, and where he remained for some weeks during the year 1680. It has always been acknowledged that the village stood on or near the shore of Mille Lac, but not until 1900 was...

Biography of Tams Bixby

When historians of the future write of the state of Oklahoma, or recite the romance of the American Indian, they needs must tell the story of Tams Bixby. Above his signature five great Indian nations ceased to be, one hundred and one thousand red-men foreswore allegiance to their tribal chieftains to become citizens of the United States and twenty-one million acres of Indian hunting grounds were made ready for admission to the Union. It was in 1897 that Tams Bixby left Minnesota, where he had gained national prominence as chairman of the Republican state central committee and came to Indian Territory with a portfolio from President McKinley as a commissioner to the Five Civilized Tribes. Here in the Indian Territory the people of the five tribes the Choctaws, Chickasaws, Cherokees, Seminoles and Creeks were making their last stand against the advancing civilization of the white man. Driven from their homes in Georgia, Alabama and Mississippi they had migrated hence with great fortitude and suffering to a land that had been promised them “as long as grass grows and water flows.” Already they had adopted the white man’s modes of living in a rough wild way but they clung, with the fidelity of their fathers, to their tribal forms of government. Each nation owned its land in common, each red-man squatted upon that ground which best pleased him and there built his abode. And now the inevitable advance of the white man, the march of civilization that would not be denied, was pressing down upon them, crowding them further and further beyond-and there was no other place for them to...

Bergstrom, Arnold K. – Obituary

Union, Oregon Arnold K. Bergstrom, 76, of Union, died March 4 of natural causes at his residence. A graveside service will be conducted at a later date. Arrangements are under the direction of Loveland Funeral Chapel, La Grande. Mr. Bergstrom, known as Arnie, was born May 14, 1930, in Kensington, Minn. He was one of ten children born to Theodore Ewald and Edith Eleanora (Eriksson) Bergstrom, both of whom sailed to America from Sweden in the early 1900s. His father arrived in America first, his mother following in 1911 aboard the Lusitania. He grew up in a frugal environment and often spoke of his mother making head cheese, using “everything but the squeal.” He graduated from high school in Red Wing, Minn., and served in the Minnesota National Guard in 1949 and 1950. In 1951 Arnie married Marvis Swanson in Minnesota. They in later years. He later moved to Oregon and married Carol Sheasly in Las Vegas, Nev. They lived in Portland and divorced after a few years. He was employed by Stevens-Tracy Inc. in Portland as an outside automotive parts salesman. After a long courtship, Arnie married Marcia Bach in Stevenson, Wash., in 1977. Later that year they relocated to La Grande, where they owned La Grande Auto Supply and Grande-Union Auto Supply until the early 1980s. He then was employed as an outside salesman and counter man for Bailey Farm Equipment for some years, after which he went to work for NAPA Auto Parts as an outside salesman and counter man. He retired at the age of 71. Arnie enjoyed fishing and hunting in his earlier years....

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