Discover your family's story.

Enter a grandparent's name to get started.

Start Now

Biographical Sketch of De Witt Clinton Dimock

This pioneer Moline business man and sterling citizen was born October 1, 1820, at Wellington, Connecticut. He came west and located at Geneseo, Illinois. in 1840, taking up his residence in Moline in 1843. His activities as a manufacturer began in 1852 when he formed a partnership with Judge John M. Gould for the making of furniture and wooden ware. On the incorporation of the firm of Dimock, Gould & Company, in 1869, he was elected its president. This position he held till 1884, when he retired from the head of the concern, retaining his connection through the office of treasurer. Mr. Dimock was also interested in a number of other successful enterprises, among which may be mentioned the First National Bank of Moline. He was one of the original stockholders of this institution and long served as a member of the board of directors. Mr. Dimock married June 17, 1843, Miss Maria H. Hubbard, daughter of Rufus Hub-bard. She was born in Bergen, Genesse County, New York. Two daughters were the issue of their union. The older, Nellie E., died when but two years of age. Florence, the younger, is the wife of E. H. Sleight, to whom she was married in 1880. Mr. Dimock was one of the founders of the First Congregational Church of Moline, and he and his wife are members of and liberal contributors to the support of the same. Mr. Dimock has been a strong Republican ever since that party was organized, and during the war was a staunch Union man. He died May 23,...

Biography of Henry Howland Chase, M. D.

Holding in high estimate the duties and responsibilities which his position involved, and more than ordinarily successful as a medical practitioner surgeon, Dr. Henry H. Chase is well remembered in Rock Island, the city in which he spent the later years of his life. He was an American of the highest type, and of purest blood, as well. His lineage on both sides is traceable for many generations back on American soil. His mother is a direct descendant of John Howland of Mayflower fame. His father was a relative of the late Chief Justice Chase of the United States Supreme Court. Henry Howland Chase was born October 7, 1858, in Amboy, Lee County, Illinois, and died May 22, 1906, at Rock Island. His father was Albion Pierce Chase, himself a physician, and his mother, Deborah Cushing (Howland) Chase. The father was a native of Maine and the mother of Massachusetts. The couple came west and located at Amboy, Illinois, in 1856, living there till the husband’s death May 27, 1879. The father graduated in the School of Alapaphon, and after coming west took up the practice of Homeopathy, and has practiced in both schools after that. Our subject received his general education in the public schools of Amboy, at a school for boys at Waltham, Massachusetts, and the State Normal at Bloomington, Illinois. His professional training was received at the Chicago Homeopathic College, from which he graduated in 1881. Dr. Chase first began practicing at Geneseo, Illinois, where he was located eight years. Then he removed to Duluth, Minnesota, and remained seven years, becoming a member of the state...

Biography of Guy V. Pettit

In none of the walks of life, perhaps, does the personality of the man impress itself so thoroughly upon the public with which he deals as in the case of the editor of a country newspaper. While he does not reach the thousands that the editor of a metropolitan daily does, he offsets this disadvantage through the close personal relations he sustains with his patrons and thereby his position in the community is rendered the more difficult of the two to maintain. While the head of the news gathering department of a big paper may strike right and left with but small chance of offending any considerable portion of his clientele, the scribe of the country weekly must exercise care and tact, for his financial success requires the support of at least half of the people of his territory. Therefore the trenchant pen is not his to wield. He must attain his ends by other means. A successful country editor is Guy V. Pettit of the Reynolds Press-a man who has the rare gift of being able to give expression to his own ideas of right and wrong and still retain the personal friendship of practically every individual who reads his newspaper. Mr. Pettit was born July 17, 1868, seven miles south of Geneseo, on a farm in Henry County, Illinois. He is a son of Charles E. and Ellen M. Pettit, and dates his ancestry on American soil well back into the seventeenth century. His paternal grandparents were Pennsylvanians and his maternal grand-parents New Yorkers. His father was a private in Company E, Eighth Illinois Volunteer Infantry, and...

Biography of Henry A. Ainsworth

Henry A. Ainsworth, president of the Moline Trust and Savings Bank, and president of the Williams & White Company, manufacturers of steam hammers and other special tools, is classed among the truly representative citizens of Moline, and dates his residence there since 1870. He is a native of Vermont, born in Williamstown, September 28, 1833. His father, Calvin Ainsworth, was also a native of Vermont, born in Brookfield, but in early life moved to Williamstown, where for fifty years he was a general merchant, well and favorably known in all that section of the country. He married Miss Laura Lynde, a native of Vermont, whose father, Cornelius Lynde, was the first circuit judge of Orange County, that state. The Ainsworth family was of English descent, the first of the name coming to New England in the Seventeenth Century and locating in Chelsea, Massachusetts. The Lyndes are also of English descent, having settled in this country prior to the Revolutionary War, several of the name taking part in that struggle. The subject of this sketch grew to man-hood in his native village, and in the district schools received his primary education which was supplemented by attendance in two academies. In 1853, at the age of twenty years, he left home and came west, locating in Geneseo, Henry County, Illinois, where he engaged in general merchandising on his own account. In this line he continued eight years, then sold out, and for a few years was engaged in the hardware and agricultural implement trade in the same place. In both lines he met with good success. In 1870 Mr. Ainsworth came...

Biographical Sketch of Harry Ainsworth

Among the leading manufacturers of Moline, Illinois, is Mr. Harry Ainsworth, vice-president of Williams, White & Company, manufacturers of heavy machine tools. Mr. Ainsworth was born at Geneseo, Illinois, May 9, 1862. He is the son of Henry A. Ainsworth (whose biography appears in this book) and Sarah A., his wife. He was educated in Oberlin College (class of 1884) and Harvard Law School (class of 1887). Although admitted to the bar of the State of Illinois, Mr. Ainsworth never practiced, but instead entered the office of Williams, White & Company with his father, where he has continued ever since as secretary, treasurer and vice president. Mr. Ainsworth has served as secretary of the Tri-City Manufacturers’ Association for a number of years; also as member of the public library board, of which he is now president. He is a member of the First Congregational Church of Moline, in which he has served in various offices, being now and for years past, superintendent of the Sunday School. In politics Mr. Ainsworth is a Republican, though independent, when his judgment prompts him to assert such independence. Mr. Ainsworth was married to Stella A. Davidson, the daughter of Mr. Orlando Davidson, banker, of Elgin, Illinois, in the year 1889. In this connection it is interesting to state that Mrs. Ainsworth’s grandfather, on the maternal side, James T. Gifford, laid out the City of Elgin. The children of this union are Caroline D., Sarah A., and Dorothy...

Pin It on Pinterest