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Biography of Judge James P. Wood

Integrity, intelligence and system are qualities which will advance the interests of any man or any profession, and will tend to the prosperity to which all aspire. The life of Judge James P. Wood in the professional arena has been characterized by intelligence, integrity, sound judgment and persevering industry. He is one of Cleburne County’s most popular and capable attorneys, who has acquired prominence because he is worthy of it. He was born on a farm in Barbour County, Ala., in 1843, a son of James and Nancy (Byrd) Wood, who were born, reared and married in the Old North State, and in 1830 moved to Barbour County, Ala., where they both died when fifty-two years of age. The father was prominent in the Democratic circles of Alabama, and also stood high in Masonry and mercantile and agricultural circles. Judge James P. Wood was the eighth of nine children born to his parents, and received his education in the Military Academy of Clayton, Ala. Early in 1861, before Alabama had succeeded from the Union, he had joined the Clayton Guards of the First Alabama Infantry, and was stationed at Pensacola for one year. At the reorganization of the Confederate Army, in 1862, he became a member of Company B, of the Thirty-ninth Alabama Infanty, and held the rank of second lieutenant. On July 28, 1864, when he was wounded at Atlanta, he was in command of his company. During his service he was in many battles, among which were Fort Pickens; Mumfordsville, where he was on picket duty, and when that place was surrendered he received the flag of...

Biography of Benjamin F. E. Marsh

Benjamin F. E. Marsh. For thirty consecutive years Mr. Marsh had served with unceasing diligence and fidelity the Santa Fe Railway Company. His many friends in the service and among Topeka people generally had a special sense of pleasure in learning of his recent promotion to the office of assistant general freight agent. He had earned every step of his promotion since taking his first clerkship, and had long been recognized as an expert on many of the technical subjects counected with the handling of the freight department of this great system. A native of Topeka where he was born June 25, 1869, Mr. Marsh is a son of William Tolar and Nancy (Poague) Marsh. His father was born in Ohio June 10, 1837, and settled in Topeka in 1868. He was a building contractor, and in the course of his business built a home at 414 East Sixth Avenue in which he lived until his death on August 21, 1912. During the Civil war he had served as captain of a company in the One Hundred and Thirty-fourth Indiana Infantry and was long a prominent member of Lincoln Post Grand Army of the Republic at Topeka. Politically he was a republican. The Marsh family came out of Essex County, England, as early as 1645, first settling at New Haven, Connecticut, and from there going to Elizabethtown, New Jersey, in 1665. Some of the land early occupied by the family in New Jersey still belongs to one of the descendants. Another member of the family, Daniel Marsh, served as quartermaster-general in Washington’s army during the Revolution, and lost his...

Biographical Sketch of Richard J. Coach

Coach, Richard J.; Secret Service Co.; born, Galveston, Texas, July 22, 1860; engaged in secret service work in 1877; established the R. J. Coach Detective Service in 1884, and incorporated in 1904; has established offices throughout the United States and in all the principal cities in the world; pres. and gen. mgr. The R. J. Coach Secret Service Co.; member Chamber of...

Biography of Washington Grayson

Washington Grayson, prominently identified with the tribal government of the Creek Nation and closely associated with many public interests of importance to community and state, makes his home in Eufaula, where he is held in high respect and honor by all who know him. Mr. Grayson was born at Eufaula, Oklahoma, on the 15th of May, 1882, and is a son of George W. and Annie (Stidham) Grayson, both of whom are half-blood Creeks. The former was reared in and near Eufaula and was closely associated with public events in that section of Oklahoma then a part of the Indian Territory. George W. Grayson began his education in the district schools of the Creek Nation and later became a student in the Eufaula Boarding school. He afterward went to Webb City, Missouri, where he attended the Baptist school and at a later period became a student in a business college at Galveston, Texas. He next attended the West Texas Military Academy at San Antonio, Texas, for a period of four years and on completing his course there immediately received a commission as a Lieutenant in the Philippine Constabulary. Going to the Orient he served from August, 1903, until July, 1913, becoming familiar with all of the problems government. At length resigning his position, Mr. Grayson returned to Eufaula and the next two years constituted a period of leisure in his life. He was afterward made official Creek tribal secretary but after America’s entrance into the World war in 1917, he resigned his position and went to the Officers’ Training Camp at Fort Logan H. Roots, near Little Rock, Arkansas....

Smith, Gilford – Obituary

Gilford Smith’s BurialThe Galveston, Texas News has the following concerning the burial of Gilford Smith, the 20-year old son of Mr. and Mrs. A.B.C. Smith, of this place. Gilford Smith, the young man who was drowned in the bay on March 6, and whose body was recovered Friday, was buried yesterday morning at Lakeview cemetery at 8:30 o’clock. His comrades, the crew of the Gertrude, were the pallbearers, and the immense heap of flowers which covered the coffin testified to the esteem in which he was held by his friends. Rev. G.S. Sexton, pastor of the Central Methodist Church, performed the burial service at the grave. Young Smith’s home was Elgin, Or. Capt. T. J. Bludworth of the Gertrude, received a telegram yesterday from the young man’s father inquiring if the body of his son had been found and asking the captain to see about its burial. Young Smith was known to be a man of exceptional good habits. Gilford H. Smith was drowned at Bolivar Point, six miles from Galveston, Tex., March 6th, 1904. He was born in Chester county, Illinois, Nov. 25, 1883, and came to Elgin, Ore. in 1891, with his parents, two brothers and sister. He lived here until the Fall of 1902, when he went to Tacoma, Wash., where in Dec, of that year he shipped as a sailor on the Eaton Hall for Callio, Peru, landing there in March of last year. From there he sailed on the English ship Endora, to Chile, thence to Hamburg, Germany. He then returned to the U.S., landing at Galveston, Tex., in November 1903, where he engaged...

Wilmer Lewis Todd of Galveston TX

Wilmer Lewis Todd9, (Henry8, Ezra L.7, Ezra L.6, James5, James4, James3, Samuel2, Christopher1) born Sept. 1, 1853, in Waterbury, Conn., married at Galveston, Texas, Sept. 2, 1875, Rose Adele Belden, who was born July 31, 1855, in Lavacca, Texas. Children: *2744. Alfred Lewis, b. May 13, 1876. *2745. Wilmer Lewis, b. Nov. 27, 1879. 2746. Ethel, b. May 15, 1882, d. June 16, 1882. *2747. Bertha Adele, b. March 3, 1885. *2748. Rose Elinor, b. April 22,...

Coaque Tribe

Coaque Indians. A tribe formerly living on Malhado Island, off the coast of Texas, where Cabeza de Vaca suffered shipwreck in 1527. This was almost certainly Galveston Island. Cabeza de Vaca found two tribes, each with its own language, living there, one the Han, the other the Coaque. The people subsisted from November to February on a root taken from the shoal water and on fish which they caught in weirs; they visited the mainland for berries and oysters. They displayed much affection toward their children and greatly mourned their death. For a year after the loss of a son the parents wailed each day before sunrise, at noon, and at sunset. As soon as this cry was heard it was echoed by all the people of the tribe. At the end of the year a ceremony for the dead was held, after which “they wash and purify themselves from the stain of smoke.” They did not lament for the aged. The dead were buried, all but those who had “practiced medicine,” who were burned. At the cremation a ceremonial dance was held, beginning when the fire was kindled and continuing until the bones were calcined. The ashes were preserved, and at the expiration of a year they were mixed with water and given to the relatives to drink. During the period of mourning the immediate family of a deceased person did not go after food, but had to depend on their kindred for means to live. When a marriage had been agreed on, custom forbade the man to address his future mother-in-law, nor could he do so after...

Biographical Sketch of Gunther Weiss

Gunther Weiss, of the firm of Weiss & Frommel, proprietors of the Charleston Woolen-Mill, Charleston; was born in Leutenberg, Sharzburg, Rudolstadt, Germany, July 6, 1823; he attended school till the age of 14, and was then apprenticed to learn the weaver’s trade; in 1845, he came to the United States, landing in Galveston, Texas; on the breaking-out of the war with Mexico,. he volunteered in the 18th Tex. V. I., and served under Gen. Taylor; in the spring of 1848, he went to Cincinnati, where he remained until 1852, when he went to Terre Haute, Ind., and began business as a grocery and provision merchant, which he continued for twenty-two years; in 1874, he came to Charleston, and assumed an active part in the management of the Charleston Woolen-Mill, in which he had been a partner since 1869. Mr. Weiss was married Nov. 17, 1853, to Miss Carrie Newhart, of Cincinnati, a native of Bavaria, Germany; they have eight children – Otto P., Emma (wife of Alfred C. Ficklin, of Charleston), Louise, Aurora, Helena, Adolph G., Carrie and...

Biographical Sketch of McKnabb, John

Santa Fe Prisoner John McKnabb, one more of those unfortunate ones who accompanied the disastrous Santa Fe expedition in 1841, was a native of Scotland, and came to Fort Bend County in 1837. He was at Austin during the early building of that place, when the Indians harassed the few settlers almost continually. In 1841, when the expedition to Santa Fe was inaugurated, John McKnabb was there, and volunteered, as many other young men did, for the perilous trip, and suffered all the hardships of the long march across the plains and sandy deserts; want of water and provisions being the main cause of their sufferings while making their way through to the line of New Mexico. They were all finally captured by the Mexicans and carried to old Mexico, where they worked on the streets, lay in dungeons, and suffered all manner of indignities at the hands of their captors for nearly two years before they were finally released and al-lowed to come home. On the return trip Mr. McKnabb took shipping at Vera Cruz and came to Galveston, and from there to Richmond, Fort Bend County. He died in 1894, and was buried on his farm on the Brazos River, five miles above Richmond. He has one son, A. D. McKnabb, now in the saddlery business in...

Biographical Sketch of Hodge, Robert

Mr. Hodge is now a resident of Richmond, Fort Bend County, and has been for nearly sixty-six years; was born on Galveston Island on the 18th of May 1836. His parents were colonists of Stephen F. Austin, and settled near Damon’s Mound. When the Mexicans came in 1836 the people around the mound fled before them, and took refuge at Galveston, except those who went with Houston’s army. This disagreeable flight caused the birthplace of Mr. Hodge to be on the famous island. After the battle of San Jacinto the family removed to Fort Bend County, and their descendants have made this their home...
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