Discover your family's story.

Enter a grandparent's name to get started.

Start Now

Cussins, George Oscar – Obituary

George (Dock) Cussins Passes at LaGrande George Oscar (Dock) Cussins, for 53 years a resident of Wallowa county, died at the Grande Ronde hospital yesterday morning as the result of a heart ailment which had followed a siege of bronchial pneumonia suffered by Mr. Cussins last winter. Last Thursday Mr. Cussins was taken to the hospital by his nephew, Roy Gastin, and his condition gradually grew worse until the end came. No funeral arrangements had been made late yesterday, pending the arrival of a sister and brothers. Mr. Cussins was born in Beatrice, Neb., in September, 1870, and when a lad of 17 came to Wallowa. He first landed on Alder Slope and engaged in sheep herding, working for several sheep men, among them the late Jonathan Haas. He saved his earnings and with Frank Cook as partner went into the sheep business, but that was prior to the depression of 1893, and during those hard times they lost their sheep. After this misfortune Mr. Cussins worked as a herder and laborer again until 1900 when he and his brother-in-law J. B. Gastin, purchased the 683 – acre ranch in the Lower Leap which had since been his home. In 1924 Mr. Gastin died and since that time Mrs. Gastin, her son Roy, and Mr. Cussins, had continued operating the farm and he had made his home with his sister and nephew. Mr. Cussins is survived by two sisters, Mrs. Gastin of Wallowa, and Mrs. Tom Jacob of Imnaha, and four brothers, Dan and Norris of Lostine, Arthur of Enterprise, and Joe of Nebraska. Norris is a patient in...

Gastin, Kate May – Obituary

Kate Gastin Laid To Rest Here Wednesday Funeral services for Kate May Gastin were held Wednesday afternoon at the Christian church in Wallowa with the Rev. Floyd E. White of Joseph in charge. Burial was at the Wallowa cemetery beside her husband, James B. Gastin, who died in1924. Mrs. Gastin was 81 years of age. Though her strength and activity was somewhat reduced since the death of a daughter about a year ago, she remained active in her daily duties to the very hour of her death. Her son, Roy, with whom she lived, had been at home until 2 o’clock last Saturday, and left on an errand to Lostine and Enterprise. When he returned at 5:20 he found his mother seated at a chair at a table in the kitchen. She was, however, dead. Irvin, who also lives at home in the Leap district, had been gone all afternoon doing some work in the Gastin pasture nearby. When Roy left, his mother was at work in the garden, gathering cucumbers and squash. Apparently she had come into the house and had done some household work, including putting clean pillow cases on the beds upstairs. She had apparently lain on a couch downstairs for a time. As Roy surmises, his mother suffered a heart attack, perhaps finding it difficult to breath while lying down, she may have risen to take a seat on a chair, and here it was she expired. Because his mother had not yet gone to feed the chickens, as was her custom at 4 o’clock he assumes death may have come about 4 o’clock. Mrs....

Cussins, Leander Roy – Obituary

Wallowa County Man Stricken Leander Roy Cussins, 86, a retired farmer and sheepherder, and resident of Wallowa County for the past 73 years, died at his home near Lostine last Sunday. Graveside services were held today at 11 a.m. in the Lostine cemetery with the Rev. A .L. Kintner officiating. Mr. Cussins was born in Beatrice, Neb., the son of Samuel J. and Elizabeth Cussins. He had never married. Survivors include a brother, Arthur Cussins, and a sister, Mrs. Odelia Jacobs, both of Enterprise, Roy, Eugene and Irvin Gastin of Wallowa, are among the nephews and Mrs. Sylvia Bales of Enterprise is a niece. A sister Mrs. Kate Gastin died Sept. 2. Source: A Wallowa County Newspaper, November 12, 1961 Contributed by: Dixie...

Cousins, Arthur E. – Obituary

Arthur E. Cousins, 93, a retired sheepherder and farmer, died Aug. 16 at the local hospital. He was the son of Samuel J. and Elizabeth Cousins and was born April 24, 1877 in Pickrell, Neb. He came to Wallowa County 83 years ago. Graveside services were today (Tuesday) at 2 p.m. in the Enterprise cemetery, with Rev. Lester T. Wells officiating. He has no known survivors. Wallowa County Newspaper, August 18, 1970 Contributed by: Dixie...

Biography of J. Bruce Dick

J. Bruce Dick is a banker by profession, but during his career of thirty-two years had made a record of creditable performance in several lines of work, farming as well as commercial endeavors. He is now cashier of the Labette State Bank at Labette. He is of Irish ancestry. His grandfather was born near Belfast, Ireland, was married in his native country and then brought his family to America, following his trade as mechanic in Philadelphia, and from there moving to Hanover, Illinois, where he spent the rest of his days as a farmer. His children were: Robert, a retired farmer at Hanover, Illinois; Amanda May, wife of a farmer at Hanover, Illinois; W. H. Dick; John, who served as a soldier of the Union army during the Civil War and died at Ottawa, Kansas, in 1916, a retired farmer; Ann, who died at Hanover, Illinois, in 1916, is survived by her husband, Mr. Speer, who is still living there. W. H. Dick, father of the Labette banker, is now living at Webber, Kansas, and had had a long and active career as a farmer in several states. He was born at Hanover, Illinois, August 17, 1849, grew up and married there, and left his farm to go out to Nebraska about 1879. He was an early settler in that state, and after living some months at Pawnee City moved to Liberty. He was on a farm there two years, then operated a lumberyard nine years and a general merchandise store for a similar period. In 1903 he came to Kansas, and at Webber established a state bank. He...

Biography of H. V. Lowe

H. V. Lowe, proprietor of the telephone exchange at Ramona and an alert and energetic business man, whose connection with various interests is at all times beneficial to the enterprises which he represents, was born in Sydney, Iowa, on the 18th of May, 1878. His father, James Lowe, was a native of Ohio and during the early boyhood of his son H. V. Lowe, he removed with his family to the old Indian reservation in what is now Gage County, Nebraska, settling at Beatrice. There he still resides at the advanced age of seventy-nine years. His wife, who bore the maiden name of Isabelle R. Vanlaton, was born at Sydney, Iowa, and died in Nebraska in 1919. There were seven children in their family: T. V., a resident of Goodland, Kansas; R. V., at Ramona; F. V., living at Steele City, Nebraska; H. V., of this review; Grace V., the wife of John Adcock, a resident of Yuma, Arizona; Blanche V., the wife of E. M. Shields of Lafontaine, Kansas; and May V., the wife of John Clark of Tucson, Arizona. H. V. Lowe pursued his education largely in the schools of his native city and accompanied his parents on their removal to Gage County, Nebraska. There he continued to live until 1901, when he came to Oklahoma, settling at Broken Arrow, where he entered the real estate and telephone business. He built the exchange there and after successfully operating it for six years removed to Waldron, Arkansas, where he again engaged in the telephone business, buying and operating the exchange. After a year, however, he sold out and...

Ruth Miriam Todd of Portland OR

Ruth Miriam, b. Jan. 29, 1894, she is a college graduate and was athletic editor her senior year, is a member of the largest athletic clubs in America, has recently been elected as teacher of physical culture and English in two splendid High schools. Ruth began life in a beautiful little villa by the banks of the Blue River at Blue Springs, Neb. and her arrival was heralded by the gift of a home, and half a car-load of supplies of all kinds of provisions that came over the Burlington Railroad–a bountiful and most generous consideration from her father’s people throughout the state with whom he built three churches and for whom he was superintendent, editor and pastor-at-large. Owing to pastor Todd’s responding to so many calls, Ruth’s schooling was advanced by the abilities of many teachers. Her High School studies, however, were taken in Gadsden, Alabama and Omaha, Nebraska, and her A. B. degree work was done at Southern Presbyterian College in North Carolina, and with Richmond’s Woman’s College, Richmond, Virginia; receiving therefor a five-year teacher’s certificate from the state Board of Education. This certificate was renewed in 1920 for a six year period and she received in that same year a High School Life License with the State Board of Indiana. Ruth studied music all her school-life, having both private and public tutors, and has become proficient in piano, pipe-organ and band work. She also holds Iowa and Oregon State Teachers certificates, has had common and High School work in the four states and in the last named she was one of the most efficient and popular...

Biography of Milo Eugene Davis

Milo Eugene Davis, of San Bernardino, was born in the city of Cleveland, Ohio, in 1841. His father, Asa M. Davis, was a Vermont Yankee, and married a French lady by the name of Salinas. When Eugene was a lad of twelve years, they moved from Ohio to Nebraska, then a wild frontier territory, and settled in Beatrice, which place Mr. Davis laid out and named. Their nearest neighbor lived thirty miles distant, and the city of Omaha was then but a mere hamlet. Mr. Davis died years ago upon the homestead he then founded, and being a distinguished Mason, was buried there with high Masonic honors. After graduating from Eastman’s Business College in Chicago, and a year’s experience in a mercantile house in that city, the subject of this memoir commenced railroading as an employee of the Lake Shore Company. At eighteen years of age he was running a passenger train as conductor on the Milwaukee & St. Paul Railroad. Drifting into the construction department, he was employed on construction for the Sioux City & Pacific, now a branch of the Chicago & Northwestern Railroad, for several years. In 1861 Mr. Davis enlisted in the Union army under the call for three months’ volunteers, and served as a member of the Eleventh Wisconsin Infantry until broken health compelled him to resign in 1863. He served in the capacity of a sharpshooter a portion of the time. At the battle of Pea Ridge he was General Sigel’s orderly, where he was slightly wounded; and was also wounded in the May charge upon Vicksburg. Mr. Davis came to California, landing...
Page 2 of 212

Pin It on Pinterest