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Slave Narrative of Luke Towns

Interviewer: Rachel A. Austin Person Interviewed: Luke Towns Location: Jacksonville, Florida Age: 100+(?) A Centenarian Luke Towns, a centenarian, now residing at 1335 West Eighth Street, Jacksonville, Florida, was the ninth child born to Maria and Like Towns, slaves, December 34, 1835, in a village in Tolberton County, Georgia. Mr. Town’s parents were owned by Governor Towns, whose name was taken by all the children born on the plantation; he states that he was placed on the public blocks for sale, and was purchased by a Mr. Mormon. At the marriage of Mr. Mormon’s daughter, Sarah, according to custom, he was given to this daughter as a wedding present, and thus became the slave and took the name of the Gulleys and lived with them until he became a young man at Smithville, Georgia, in Lee County. His chief work was that of carrying water, wood and working around the house when a youngster; often, he states he would hide in the woods to keep from working. Because his mother was a child-bearing woman, she did not know the hard labors of slavery, but had a small patch of cotton and a garden near the house to care for. “All of the others worked hard,” said he “but had kind masters who fed them well.” When asked if his mother were a christian, he replied “why yes: indeed she was, and believed in prayer; one day as she traveled from her patch home, just as she was about to let the ‘gap’ (this was a fence built to keep the hogs and horses shut in) down, she knelt to...

Biographical Sketch of Albert Harlow Bates

Bates, Albert Harlow; patent lawyer; born, Cincinnati, O., Jan. 24, 1869; son of Cyrus S. and Lavena S. Bates; educated, Kenyon Military Academy, Gambier, O.; Brooks Military Academy, Cleveland; Lehigh University; graduated, 1889, Mechanical Engineer, Ohio State University; graduated, 1892, LL. B.; married, Atlanta, Ga., Oct. 11, 1904, Kathleen Jones; two daughters, Margaret and Elizabeth; one son, Darwin Bates; in 1892-3, in legal dept. of The Brush Electric Co., Cleveland; 1893-96, with Robert H. Parkinson, patent lawyer, Chicago, Ill.; 1897-1905, member the firm of Thurston & Bates, patent lawyers, Cleveland; 1906-9, member firm of Bates, Fonts & Hull, patent lawyers, Cleveland; 1906 to the present time, practicing attorney under the name of Albert H. Bates; member American Society of Mechanical Engineers, and Cleveland Engineering Society, Chamber of Commerce and Psi Upsilon Fraternity; member Athletic, Shaker Heights Country and Cleveland Automobile Clubs. Recreations: Fishing and...

Biography of Hon. E. D. Shattuck

HON. E.D. SHATTUCK, – Judge Shattuck has been prominently connected with the public affairs of our state for more than thirty years, and is so closely identified with our interests and society as to be a distinctively representative man among us. His mental strength and clearness, combined with remarkable accuracy and absence of personal bias, have made his services of the highest value. He has ever maintained a peculiar coolness of judgement, and neither has been swayed by popular excitement nor has resorted to sensational methods to advance his own views or interests. He has ever been above suspicion of corruption or entanglement with corrupt rings, and has therefore been relied upon as a guardian of justice, and to prick the ambitions or corrupt designs of those who would trench upon the popular rights. For this reason he has been sought continuously to fill the office of judge; and it is a credit to our people that they prefer such men for their high positions. With peculiar plainness of manner and address, he has ever refused to cultivate popularity, yet has been frequently named by leading journals as a satisfactory candidate for governor of the state, – suggestions which have only lacked his own cooperation to meet with realization. The remarkable success of Judge Shattuck both in business, in his profession, and in public capacities, commends to young men his integrity and fidelity and honorable views of life. He has ever been an ornament to the legal profession, by his practice condemning extortion, and carrying honesty into every detail. E.D. Shattuck was born at Bakersfield, Vermont, December 31, 1824,...

Warhol, Peter – Obituary

Peter Warhol, 99, a former Halfway resident, died Nov. 3, 2002, at a nursing home in Cedar Falls, Iowa. He had elected to receive only comfort measures for pneumonia, thereby dying as he had lived: on his own terms. A memorial service will be held November 21, in Waterloo, Iowa. His 99-year life was remarkable for its extraordinary accomplishments. Born in Minneapolis to immigrant parents in a family of six boys, he lost his mother when he was 11, which required household chores and employment at an early age. Because of this workload, when asked for details of his boyhood he would usually say that “it wasn’t very interesting.” Characteristic of his lifelong independence and confidence was his attending his high school graduation from the audience. He and a friend had completed their college requirements and quit school a semester early. The administration had disagreed with their innovative program and refused to issue them diplomas. Overcoming obstacles of finance and health, he graduated Phi Beta Kappa in metallurgical engineering from the University of Minnesota at Minneapolis in 1929 and began an unusually creative and distinguished career. While working for the Butler Bros. Mining Co. he discovered the Fuller’s Earth District near Thomasville, Ga. On the Mesabi Iron Range in Minnesota he introduced several important mining and mineral-processing innovations still in use today. He was president of Butler Brothers when the company was sold in 1948. He spent the next 2 years with the Leo Butler Construction Co. in Washington D.C., then joined the Ogleby Norton Co. to be in charge of the first taconite development in Minnesota. This project...

York, Richard “Scott” – Obituary

Richard “Scott” York, 38, of Klamath Falls, a former Baker City resident, died March 10, 2002, at his home. He suffered a lifelong hereditary disease and had been awaiting a liver transplant for the past four years. His funeral was at 4 p.m. today at the O’Hair & Riggs Funeral Chapel in Klamath Falls. The Rev. John Baund of the First Presbyterian Church officiated. Private burial was at Eternal Hills Memorial Garden. There was a reception afterward at the First Presbyterian Church in Klamath Falls. He was born in Baker City on April 7, 1963, to Carl Lockwood York and Shara Lynn Loomis. He attended Baker schools and was active in the Boy Scout program. After the death of their parents, Scott and his sister, Carol, moved to Klamath Falls in June 1979 where they lived with their loving grandparents, Gordon and Evelyn Loomis. He was a 1982 graduate of Klamath Union High School. After graduation, he attended Western Oregon University at Monmouth and Willamette University at Salem. In 1987, he moved to Seattle, where he worked as the night manager for a hotel. He next moved to Calgary, Canada, where he attended the University of Calgary. He trained as a speed skater and also worked at several national and international speed skating and figure skating events. He returned to Seattle and graduated from the International Air Academy in the early 1990s. He was immediately hired by United Airlines and worked as a ticket agent in San Francisco. In 1994, he moved to Atlanta, Ga., where he worked for Value Jet and another small regional carrier. It was while...

Biography of Erasmus D. Shattuck

Judge E. D. Shattuck was born in Bakersfield, Franklin County, Vermont, December 31, 1824. He spent his boyhood and youth on a farm and was prepared for a collegiate course at Bakersfield Academy. In 1844 he entered Vermont University, pursued the full classical course and graduated in 1848. While in college he was dependent upon his own resources for means to prosecute his studies, and during vacations and some part of term time he taught school in the country or had private classes in the village. Notwithstanding these disadvantages and interruptions he completed the college course in the prescribed time and stood third in his class on final examinations. On leaving college Mr. Shattuck was employed for a year as teacher of Latin and mathematics in Bakersfield Academy. He then went to Georgia and taught a year in Newnan Seminary, situated about twenty-five miles from the city of Atlanta. While in Newnan he employed his leisure in reading law in the office of Archibald McKinley, at that time one of the leading lawyers in that part of the State. In 1851 he returned north and located in Malone, New York, where he applied himself to the study of law in the office of Parmelee & Fitch. In the Spring of 1852 he went to New York City and entered the office of Abner Benedict, where he remained reading law and acquiring the details of practice until October, 1852, when he was admitted to the bar. Soon after his admission to the bar he decided to come to Oregon, at that time almost an unknown region. He did not purpose...
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