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Slave Narrative of Mary Anderson

Interviewer: T. Pat Matthews Person Interviewed: Mary Anderson Location: 17 Poole Road, R.F.D. #2, Raleigh, North Carolina Place of Birth: Wake County NC Date of Birth: May 10, 1851 Age: 86 My name is Mary Anderson. I was born on a plantation near Franklinton, Wake County, N. C. May 10, 1851. I was a slave belonging to Sam Brodie, who owned the plantation at this place. My missus’ name was Evaline. My father was Alfred Brodie and my mother was Bertha Brodie. We had good food, plenty of warm homemade clothes and comfortable houses. The slave houses were called the quarters and the house where marster lived was called the great house. Our houses had two rooms each and marster’s house had twelve rooms. Both the slave and white folks buildings were located in a large grove one-mile square covered with oak and hickory nut trees. Marster’s house was exactly one mile from the main Louisburg Road and there was a wide avenue leading through the plantation and grove to marster’s house. The house fronted the avenue east and in going down the avenue from the main road you traveled directly west. The plantation was very large and there were about two hundred acres of cleared land that was farmed each year. A pond was located on the place and in winter ice was gathered there for summer use and stored in an icehouse, which was built in the grove where the other buildings were. A large hole about ten feet deep was dug in the ground; the ice was put in that hole and covered. [TR: HW note...

Slave Narrative of Ida Adkins

Interviewer: Travis Jordan Person Interviewed: Ida Adkins Location: Durham, North Carolina Age: 79 Ex-slave 79 years. [TR note: Numerous hand written notations and additions in the following interview (i.e. wuz to was; er to a; adding t to the contractions.) Made changes where obvious without comment. Additions and comments were left as notation, in order to preserve the flow of the dialect.] I wuz bawn befo’ de war. I wuz about eight years ole when de Yankee mens come through. My mammy an’ pappy, Hattie an’ Jim Jeffries belonged to Marse Frank Jeffries. Marse Frank come from Mississippi, but when I wuz bawn he an’ Mis’ Mary Jane wuz livin’ down herr near Louisburg in North Carolina whare dey had er big plantation an’ [HW addition: I] don’ know how many niggers. Marse Frank wuz good to his niggers, ‘cept [HW addition: that] he never give dem ernough to eat. He worked dem hard on half rations, but he didn’ believe in all de time beatin’ an’ sellin’ dem. My pappy worked at de stables, he wuz er good horseman, but my mammy worked at de big house helpin’ Mis’ Mary Jane. Mammy worked in de weavin’ room. I can see her now settin’ at de weavin’ machine an’ hear de pedals goin’ plop, plop, as she treaded dem wid her feets. She wuz a good weaver. I stayed ‘roun’ de big house too, pickin’ up chips, sweepin’ de yard an’ such as dat. Mis’ Mary Jane wuz quick as er whippo’-will. She had black eyes dat snapped, an’ dey seed everythin’. She could turn her head so quick...

Slave Narrative of Mattie Curtis

Interviewer: Mary A. Hicks Person Interviewed: Mattie Curtis Location: Raleigh, North Carolina Location of Birth: Orange County NC Age: 98 Occupation: Sewing Before And After The War An interview with Mattie Curtis, 98 years old, of Raleigh, North Carolina, Route # 4. I wus borned on de plantation of Mr. John Hayes in Orange County ninety-eight years ago. Seberal of de chilluns had been sold ‘fore de speculator come an’ buyed mammy, pappy an’ we three chilluns. De speculator wus named Bebus an’ he lived in Henderson, but he meant to sell us in de tobacco country. We come through Raleigh an’ de fust thing dat I ‘members good wus goin’ through de paper mill on Crabtree. We traveled on ter Granville County on de Granville Tobacco path till a preacher named Whitfield buyed us. He lived near de Granville an’ Franklin County line, on de Granville side. Preacher Whitfield, bein’ a preacher, wus supposed to be good, but he ain’t half fed ner clothed his slaves an’ he whupped ’em bad. I’se seen him whup my mammy wid all de clothes offen her back. He’d buck her down on a barrel an’ beat de blood outen her. Dar wus some difference in his beatin’ from de neighbors. De folks round dar ‘ud whup in de back yard, but Marse Whitfield ‘ud have de barrel carried in his parlor fer de beatin’. We ain’t had no sociables, but we went to church on Sunday an’ dey preached to us dat we’d go ter hell alive iffen we sassed our white folks. Speakin’ ’bout clothes, I went as naked as...

Slave Narrative of Frank Freeman

Interviewer: T. Pat Matthews Person Interviewed: Frank Freeman Location: 216 Tuppers Lane, Raleigh, North Carolina Date of Birth: December 14, 1857 Place of Birth: Wake County NC Age: 76 I was born near Rolesville in Wake County Christmas Eve, 24 of December 1857. I am 76 years old. My name is Frank Freeman and my wife’s name is Mary Freeman. She is 78 years old. We live at 216 Tuppers Lane, Raleigh, Wake County, North Carolina. I belonged to ole man Jim Wiggins jus’ this side o’ Roseville, fourteen miles from Raleigh. The great house is standin’ there now, and a family by the name o’ Gill, a colored man’s family, lives there. The place is owned by ole man Jim Wiggins’s grandson, whose name is O. B. Wiggins. My wife belonged to the Terrells before the surrender. I married after the war. I was forty years ole when I was married. Old man Jim Wiggins was good to his niggers, and when the slave children were taken off by his children they treated us good. Missus dressed mother up in her clothes and let her go to church. We had good, well cooked food, good clothes, and good places to sleep. Some of the chimneys which were once attached to the slave houses are standing on the plantation. The home plantation in Wake County was 3000 acres. Marster also owned three and a quarter plantations in Franklin County. He kept about ten men at home and would not let his slave boys work until they were 18 years old, except tend to horses and do light jobs around...

Slave Narrative of Charles W. Dickens

Interviewer: T. Pat Matthews Person Interviewed: Charles W. Dickens Location: Raleigh, North Carolina (1115 East Lenoir Street) My name is Charles W. Dickens. I lives at 1115 East Lenoir Street, Raleigh, North Carolina, Wake County. I wuz born August 16, 1861, de year de war started. My mother wuz named Ferebee Dickens. My father wuz named John Dickens. I had nine sisters and brothers. My brothers were named Allen, Douglas, my name [HW: question mark above “my name”], Jake, Johnnie and Jonas. The girls Katie, Matilda Francis, and Emily Dickens. My grandmother wuz named Charity Dickens. My grandfather wuz Dudley T. Dickens. I do not know where dey came from. No, I don’t think I do. My mother belonged to Washington Scarborough, and so did we chilluns. My father he belonged to Obediah Dickens and missus wuz named Silvia Dickens. Dey lowed mother to go by the name of my father after dey wuz married. We lived in log houses and we had bunks in ’em. Master died, but I ‘member missus wuz mighty good to us. We had tolerable fair food, and as fur as I know she wuz good to us in every way. We had good clothing made in a loom, that is de cloth wuz made in de loom. My father lived in Franklin County. My mother lived in Wake County. I ‘member hearin’ father talk about walkin’ so fur to see us. There wuz about one dozen slaves on de plantation. Dere were no hired overseers. Missus done her own bossing. I have heard my father speak about de patterollers, but I never seed...

Shakori Indians

Shakori Tribe: A native name but its significance unknown, though perhaps the same as Sugari, “stingy or spoiled people,” or “of the river whose-water-cannot-be drunk.” Also called: Cacores, a misprint. Shakori Connections. The Shakori belonged to the Siouan linguistic family, their closest connections being evidently with the southern division of the Siouan tribes of the East. Barnwell (1908) identified them with the Sissipahaw. Shakori Location. The Shakori moved so frequently and there is so much uncertainty regarding their early history, that this is hard to give, but, as they usually kept company with the Eno, tenancy of the courses of Shocco and Big Shocco Creeks in the present Vance, Warren, and Franklin Counties is perhaps the location most closely connected with them in historic times. (See South Carolina and Virginia.) Shakori History. It is possible that the Shakori gave their name to the province of Chicora visited by Ayllon and his companions in 1521. If so, we must suppose that they moved north later in the sixteenth century or early in the seventeenth, perhaps as a result of the Pardo expeditions. In 1650 Edward Blande and his associates found the “Nottoway and Schockoores old fields” between Meherrin and Nottoway Rivers, but the Indians were not there. In 1654 Governor Yeardley of Virginia was told by a Tuscarora Indian of an inland people called the “Cacores,” probably an attempt to indicate this tribe. In 1672 Lederer found them living in a village 14 miles from that of the Eno (Lederer, 1912), and in 1701 Lawson says these two tribes (the Shakori and Eno) were in one village called Adshusheer on Eno...

Abram Rencher Winston

Lt. Col., Med. Corps, 30th Div. Born in Franklin County, 1878; son of R. N. and Charlotte Winston. Husband of Mrs. Fannie Winston. Entered the service at Franklinton July 27, 1917. Sent to Camp Sevier, S. C. Overseas to France May 8, 1918. Promoted to rank of Lt. Col. April 15, 1919; to rank of Captain, Feb. 23, 1903; to rank of Major, March 4, 1905. Fought at Somme, Aisne, Ypres, Lys. On Mexican border eight months. Landed in USA August 20, 1919. Mustered out at Camp Dix, Oct. 31, 1919. Holds British Decoration D. S. O., also American...

Robert R. Speed

2nd Lt., M. G. Co., 30th Div., 120th Regt. Born in Franklin County June 27, 1896; son of J. W. Speed and Maggie Speed. Entered service Sept. 27, 1916, at Franklinton. Sent to Camp Stewart Oct. 2, 1916, transferred from there to Camp Sevier Aug. 1st, transferred to Camp Leon Springs Jan. 1, 1918. Sailed for France May 7, 1918. Promoted to rank of Corpl. July 25, 1917. On Sept. 12, 1917, was promoted to rank of Sergt.; Oct. 30, 1918, promoted to rank of 2nd Lt. Fought at Ypres-Lys defensive, Meuse-Argonne. Wounded at Meuse-Argonne Nov. 10, 1918, and gassed. Sent to Base Hospital No. 1. Mustered out at Camp Jackson May 7,...

John D. Morris

Sergt., Inf., Co. F, 30th Div., 120th Regt. Born in Franklin County June 19, 1895; son of J. D. and Mrs. Lizzie Morris. Entered service June 3, 1915. Sent to Camp Sevier, S. C., July, 1917. Sailed for France May 12, 1918. Promoted to Corpl. 1916, Sergt. 1917. Fought at Ypres. Wounded at Ypres by shrapnel July 18, 1918. Sent to Gen. Hospital No. 6, then to King George Hospital at London, Base No. 37. Six months on Mexican border. Landed in USA Dec....

L. Leonadus Preddy

Private 1st Class, F. A., Bty. B, 30th Div., 113th Reg. Born in Franklin County; son of Robert and Mrs. Ettie Preddy. Entered service April 25, 1918, at Franklinton, N.C. Sent to Camp Jackson, S. C. Transferred to Camp Sevier, S. C. Transferred from there to Camp Mills, N. Y. Sailed for France May 25, 1918. Promoted to Private 1st Class December, 1918. Fought at Meuse-Argonne, St. Mihiel and all battles with his company. Landed in USA March 5, 1919. Mustered out at Camp Jackson, S. C., March 28,...
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