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Treaty of June 24, 1862

Articles of agreement and convention, made and concluded at Washington City, on the twenty-fourth day of June, eighteen hundred and sixty-two, by and between William P. Dole, commissioner, on the part of the United States, and the following-named chief and councilmen of the Ottawa Indians of the united bands of Blanchard’s Fork and of Roche de Bœuf, now in Franklin County, Kansas, viz: Pem-ach-wung, chief; John T. Jones, William Hurr, and James Wind, councilmen, they being thereto duly authorized by said tribe. Article 1. The Ottawa Indians of the united bands of Blanchard’s Fork and of Roche de Bœuf, having become sufficiently advanced in civilization, and being desirous of becoming citizens of the United States, it is hereby agreed and stipulated that their organization, and their relations with the United States as an Indian tribe shall be dissolved and terminated at the expiration of five years from the ratification of this treaty; and from and after that time the said Ottawas, and each and every one of them, shall be deemed and declared to be citizens of the United States, to all intents and purposes, and shall be entitled to all the rights, privileges, and immunities of such citizens, and shall, in all respects, be subject to the laws of the United States, and of the State or States thereof in which they may reside. Article 2. It is hereby made the duty of the Secretary of the Interior to cause a survey of the reservation of the said Ottawas to be made as soon as practicable after the ratification of this treaty, dividing it into eighty-acre tracts, with...

Biography of Jerry Hussey

One of the most interesting old timers of Kansas is Jerry Hussey, now living retired at Williamsburg. He served faithfully and loyally as a soldier during the Civil war, and soon after the close of that great struggle identified himself with the State of Kansas, where he helped to reclaim a part of the wilderness and make it a fertile and valuable farm. Of New England ancestry he was born in the State of Vermont in August, 1845, and when very young was left an orphan, so that he had to flght his own battles at a time when most boys have the care and direction of parents. When he was thirteen years of age in 1858 he came west, and for a time worked as a farm hand near Loveland in Clermont County, Ohio. He was working on a farm when the Civil war was declared, and in 1861, though only sixteen years of age, he enlisted in Company D of the Thirty-fourth Ohio Volunteer Infantry, which was afterwards merged with the Thirty-sixth Regiment. Most of his service was in the East on the great Virginia battle ground, and in the closing months of the war he was with Sheridan, his regiment having been mounted, in the Shenandoah Valley campaign, participating in the battle of Winchester. At Beverly, West Virginia, he was captured, and spent four months of suffering and hardship entailed by incarceration in Libby Prison. That was an experience which no man would be likely to forget, and in fact he has never fully recovered physically from the effects of the imprisonment. After the close of...

Biographical Sketch of Owen A. Bassett

Owen A. Bassett was one of the ablest and most energetie actors in the Border troubles, the Civil war and the civil affairs of the Roconstruction period. A Pennsylvasian by birth, his father moved to Illinois in 1837 and two years later to Iowa. The family home was first in Lee County. The son’s original intention was to be a civil engineer, but he finally decided in favor of the law, although the stirring and compelling affairs which entered his life prevented him for many years from utilizing the legal training which he acquired. In 1855 he was employed in the United States land office at Fort Des Moines, Iowa, but in the spring of 1856 resigned to engage in business at Lecompton. Soon afterward he entered heartily into the free-state cause, joined the military company known as the Lawrence Stubbs, and was engaged both in the battle of Franklin and the capture of Fort Saunders. Subsequently he held the positions of engineer and quartermaster with the free-state army of Kansas, and in December, 1856, moved to Leavenworth. There he engaged as engineer for the Quindaro Town Company, and in 1857 and 1858 served in the Territorial Legislature. In the latter year he moved to Franklin County, published the Kansas Freeman a few months, returned to Lawrence and was admitted to the bar. At the outbreak of the Civil war be assisted in the organization of the First Kansas Infantry, but later was commissioned lieutenant colonel of the Ninth Kansas, which later became the Second Cavalry, and with which he served until 1865. Colonel Bassett was elected district judge...

Biography of William R. Smith

One of the fine buildings bordering the State Capitol grounds at Topeka is the Kansas State Printing plant. That is the official headquarters of William R. Smith, state printer, and also secretary of the State Printing Commission and chairman of the School Book Commission of the state. Doubtless any citizen, and particularly a printer, would deem it an honor to be at the head of an establishment which experts pronounce to be the equal in mechanical equipment and operating effieiency of any commercial printing establishment in the country. When Mr. Smith went into office on July 1, 1915, he brought with him a ripe experience, including an extensive service in all the grades of the printing business, years of editorial and newspaper publishing work, and perhaps best of all an inheritance and training in the progressive Kansas spirit. When the advancement of the welfare of the state is concerned, W. R. Smith can always be found in the ranks of the workers and usually among the leaders. The influence for good he has exercised as an editor in various sections of the state can hardly be overestimated. While his life has been distinctive in more than one particular, he is in every sense a typical Kansan. He was born at the old land office and capital, Lecompton, March 21, 1872. His grandparents, William L. and America C. (Barton) Smith were Kentucky peoplo who moved west in 1854, the year the Kansas-Nebraska bill was passed through Congress, and they located at Lecompton, the historie capital of Kansas Territory. Both grandparents died in Lecompton. George W. Smith, father of the state...

Biography of Peter P. Elder

Peter P. Elder, deceased, ex-lieutenant governor of Kansas, and for many years a resident of Ottawa, was one of the most notable characters of Kansas and one of the select few who gave it a unique and substantial standing among the western states of the Union. He was a native of Maine, born in Somerset County, September 30, 1823; was of North-of-Ireland ancestry and Revolutionary stock. Mr. Elder spent the first thirty-four years of his life in his native county, getting an education and teaching school. He became an ardent abolitionist early in life, and in 1857 located in Franklin County, Kansas, prepared to do his part in defending his principles and possessions. First taking up a claim near Ohio City he commenced farming, immediately joined the Kansas militia, and in 1861 President Lincoln appointed him agent for the Osage and Seneca Indians at Fort Scott. In that position he rendered valuable service to the Union by keeping the Indians to its support, and when he resigned the agency he returned to Franklin County and located at Ottawa, which had been recently platted. In the late ’60s Mr. Elder erected the first substantial residence at Ottawa, and also established the banking firm of P. P. Elder & Company. It continued a successful business until the organization of its successor, in 1871–the First National Bank of Ottawa, of which Mr. Elder was also the first president. For the succeeding thirty years he developed into one of the largest and most successful farmers and stock raisers of the county. During all that period he had also been very active and prominent...

Biography of Foster Dwight Coburn

It is no disparagement of the rank and file of that host of Kansas militant farmers who bore the heat and burden of the day and by their aggregate efforts raised Kansas to front rank among American agricultural states, to say that Foster Dwight Coburn is the distinguished leader of them all. He has long held secure a place as “one of the really great men of Kansas.” And like other Kansas great men, his achievements and influence have translated him to a place among the nation’s great men. His position in life is the more interesting because it is due not to political prominence, not to the accident of birth or fortune, but first and last to the splendid service he has rendered his state and the cause of agriculture. Undoubtedly he is and has been for years one of America’s foremost authorities and experts on this subject. His great work, and that in which he has most pride, was rendered during his more than twenty consecutive years as secretary of the agricultural department of Kansas. Yet, again and again Mr. Coburn has spoken with enthusiasm and praise of the men. who shared before him the responsibilities and honors of that office. He often says that Alfred Gray, who organized the State Board of Agriculture in 1872, was the most useful man Kansas ever produced. It was the successor of Alfred Gray, Major J. K. Hudson, who became secretary in 1880, who first brought Coburn into the work of the board as office assistant. In the forty-four years since the Board of Agriculture was established, and among its...

Biography of Carey J. Wilson

Carey J. Wilson is superintendent of insurance for the State of Kansas. His is one of the busiest offices at the State Capitol and practically every minute of his official time is taken up either with the broader policies of the state insurance department or with the immense amount of details pertaining to the ability of companies to meet solvency requirements, as well as the general conduct of business within the state. To this office Mr. Wilson brought years of practical experience in the insurance field. He had been solely identified with insurance since he left college. Though a native of North Carolina, Carey Josephus Wilson had lived in Kansas since early infancy. He was born at Burnsville in the Old North State February 21, 1868. In 1870 his parents, George Washington and Elizabeth (Erwin) Wilson came to Kansas, settling in Brown County. They now reside at Ottawa, Kansas. His father is a Baptist minister and during the Civil war served as chaplain in the Confederate army. Carey J. Wilson grew up in the country around Powhattan, attended country schools, the academic department of Ottawa University and the Liberal Arts Course of the University of Kansas, graduating from the State University with the degree Bachelor of Arts in 1899. His early experiences were those of a Kansas farm boy, and in the intervals of acquiring a liberal education he taught for three years. Since leaving the university he had been entirely engaged in the insurance business. Mr. Wilson was in the life insurance field from 1899 to 1911. In January, 1911, he was appointed assistant state superintendent of insurance,...

Slave Narrative of Clayton Holbert

Interviewer: Leta Gray Person Interviewed: Clayton Holbert Location: Ottawa, Kansas Place of Birth: Linn County, Tennessee Age: 86 THE AMERICAN GUIDE TOPEKA, KANSAS EX SLAVE STORY OTTAWA, KANSAS BY: Leta Gray (interviewer) “My name is Clayton Holbert, and I am an ex slave. I am eighty-six years old. I was born and raised in Linn County, Tennessee. My master’s name was Pleasant “Ples” Holbert. My master had a fairly large plantation; he had, I imagine, around one hundred slaves.” “I was working the fields during the wind-up of the Civil War. They always had a man in the field to teach the small boys to work, and I was one of the boys. I was learning to plant corn, etc. My father, brother and uncle went to war on the Union side.” “We raised corn, barley, and cotton, and produced all of our living on the plantation. There was no such thing as going to town to buy things. All of our clothing was homespun, our socks were knitted, and everything. We had our looms, and made our own suits, we also had reels, and we carved, spun, and knitted. We always wore yarn socks for winter, which we made. It didn’t get cold, in the winter in Tennessee, just a little frost was all. We fixed all of our cotton and wool ourselves.” “For our meat we used to kill fifteen, twenty, or fifty, and sometimes a hundred hogs. We usually had hickory. It was considered the best for smoking meat, when we butchered. Our meat we had then was the finest possible. It had a lot more...

Biography of Herbert O. Caster

Herbert O. Caster, who, on February 2, 1914, qualified as attorney for the State Public Utilities Commission, and is now a resident of Topeka, had lived in Kansas for thirty-eight years, and is well known over the state, but particularly in his home County of Decatur, where before his admission to the bar he made a fine record for himself as an educator and an energetic factor in other affairs of public importance. When the Caster family came to Kansas in 1878 they took up a homestead in Decatur County. At that time the county was a sparsely settled regiMeigon, and there was not a single frame house within its borders. Like everyone else there the Caster family lived in a home constructed partly of sod and partly a dug-out. The old-timers of Kansas recall the hardships of the first settlers, of their incessant warfare with drought and blizzards, crop failures, and atarvation prices for such prodnce as could be aetually spared in excess of home consumption. All these discouragements the family of Herbert O. Caster erperienced. His parents were Dan and Jane (Turner) Caster. Dan Caster was a man of more than ordinary intelligence, and took an active part in local affairs in Decatur County, serving as chairman of the board of county commissioners, and in 1891 and in 1893 being elected to represent his county in the State Legislature. Herbert O. Caster is an Ohio man by birth, having been born in Meigs County, August 28, 1871, and was therefore seven years old when he came to Kansas. Within his personal experience he knows what Kansans went...

Biographical Sketch of Joel K. Goodin

Joel K. Goodin, an early lawyer and legislator and a free-state leader, was born at Somerset, Perry County, Ohio, February 24, 1824. He received an academic education, after which he took up the study of law. Early in 1854 he was admitted to the bar in his native state and the following June located upon the Wakarusa River in what is now Douglas County, Kansas. Mr. Goodin was a delegate to the Big Springs convention; was clerk of the lower house of the Topeka Legislature until it was dispersed by Colonel Sumner; was secretary of the council in the free-state Legislature of 1858, and the same year began the practice of law in Douglas County, but soon afterward removed to Ottawa. In 1866 he was elected to represent Franklin County in the Legislature, and was re-elected in 1867. While a member of the House he assisted in organizing the State School for the Deaf at Olathe. Mr. Goodin died at Ottawa on December 9,...
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