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Biographical Sketch of Jacob Mettel

Jacob Mettel was born in Hesse, Hamburg, Germany, August 12, 1845. His parents removed from the “Faderland” while he was an infant, and crossed the broad ocean to the “Land of the free,” settling in Franklin county, Indiana, where he was reared and attended school. When eighteen years of age he left home and went to Harrison, Ohio, where he learned the shoemaking trade with Frederick Fisher, remaining with him two years and nine months. In 1866 he went to Cincinnati, worked for Paul Shauner for two years and a half, and, at the expiration of that time, was employed by Christopher Homan, of the same city, with whom he remained three years and a half. From Cincinnati he came to Gallatin, in 1872, and secured employment in the shop of Amos Poe, remaining with him until 1875, when he opened business on his own account and has continued to run a shop ever since. Mr. Mettel was joined in marriage to Miss Catharine C. Bird, of Franklin county, Indiana, on the 12th of August, 1869. By this marriage they have four children; names and dates of birth as follows: Frederick Jacob, born July 13, 1872; Minnie Luella, born September 13, 1876; Oliver Otto, born December 3, 1878; and Harry H., born. May 8, 1881; all in Gallatin. Mrs. Mettel is a member of the Methodist Episcopal...

Biographical Sketch of Joshua H. Higdon

Joshua H. Higdon was born in Franklin County, Indiana, June 25, 1845. He is the son of Peter W. Higdon, a native of Ohio, and was reared and educated in his native State. He learned the blacksmithing business in Decatur county, Illinois, and worked at that trade in connection with farming until the outbreak of the ” War between the States.” He enlisted in October, 1863, in Company H, One Hundred and Twenty-third Regiment Indiana Volunteers and served bravely in the cause of the Union throughout the war. He was engaged in the battles of Chattahoochie, Kenesaw Mountain, Columbia and Nashville, besides numerous skirmishes; was discharged from the army at Washington, D. C., June 20, 1865. Returning to Indiana disabled and unfitted for work, he came west in 1869 and located at Chillicothe, Missouri, near which place he farmed during eight years. He came to Jamesport March 5, 1880, and established the blacksmithing and agricultural implement business, which he at present conducts so successfully, in company with Mr. Seth H. Powers. Mr. Higdon was married to Miss Emma J., daughter of William R. Humphrey, a native of Virginia. Mrs. Higdon was born in Decatur, Indiana, November 1, 1847. The issue of this marriage is two children now living: William Edwin and Ora Albert. Mrs. H. is a consistent member of the Methodist Episcopal...

Biography of Henry C. Jones

Henry Clay Jones, the affable and genial treasurer of Douglas County, was born in Franklin County, Indiana, December 2, 1842, a son of Calvin and Hannah (Case) Jones. He was reared to manhood in his native County and in 1860 removed to Douglas County. In 1862 he joined Company K, Seventy-ninth Illinois Infantry, and served as a private soldier in the Civil war until June 12, 1865, when he was honorably discharged at Nashville, Tennessee. He was wounded in the leg in the battle of Liberty Gap, which prevented him from keeping up with his regiment until the battle of Missionary Ridge, in which he participated. During the time between the battles of Liberty Gap and Missionary Ridge he caught cold in the wound and was confined in the hospital for three months. After his release he rejoined his regiment and was with it in every fight until the close. After the war Mr. Jones returned to Douglas County and engaged in farming, at which he continued for six years, when he removed to Arthur and bought grain. He then returned to his farm where he remained until 1894, when he became the deputy under his half-brother, James Jones (see sketch), who was then serving as County treasurer. He continued in this position during the regular term of four years. In the fall of 1188 he was elected to this office, when his half-brother, James, became deputy treasurer. On February 25, 1866, Mr. Jones married Miss Harriet E. York, who was a native of Ohio, and a daughter of Abner York. To their marriage were born three daughters: Elizabeth,...

Biography of Thomas J. Flint

Thomas J. Flint was born on a farm near Brookville, Franklin county, Indiana, on the 4th day of August, 1835. His parents removed to Daviess county when he was six years of age, and settled upon a farm in what is now Washington township, where he lived and grew up, receiving a good common school education, attending the common schools of the, township and the select school at Miami, in Saline county. When eighteen years of age he began teaching school in Butler township, Harrison county, and continued in that occupation in Harrison and Daviess counties, up to 1868, excepting four years he served in the Union army. He enlisted in the State militia in 1861, served six months, and at the expiration of that time reaeelisted, becoming a member of Company D, Twenty-seventh Missouri Volunteer Infantry, and remained in the service until January, 1863, when he was discharged on account of disability caused by sickness. On regaining his health he again enlisted, this time in Company F, Forty-third Missouri Volunteer Infantry. As a private in the. Twenty-seventh Regiment he was elected second lieutenant by his company, and held the same position in the Forty-third, when mustered out at Benton Barracks, St. Louis, June 30, 1865. Returning to Daviess county, he soon after engaged in the mercantile business with S. W. Flint, under the name and style of S. W. & T. J. Flint, at Bethany, Harrison county, they doing business there and at Salem, this county, until 1867, when he retired from the firm. He was next en-gaged in school teaching, continuing until the fall of 1868, when...

Biography of Father Berthold Staubach

Father Berthold. That the Church of the Sacred Heart at Emporia is now one of the strongest and most efficient Catholic parishes in Kansas is due primarily to the devoted services of its pastors, and more particularly to Father Berthold, who had been in charge there for the past ten years. The record of the parish during this time is sufficient evidence of Father Berthold’s excellent ability as pastor and church executive, but with these qualities he also unites an equally important one of spiritual adviser to his people. A small number of Catholic people located in and around Emporia a few years after the first settlement was made there, and in earlier times this population was served by priests who visited Emporia from Topeka. Later a parish was organized and a church erected, but in the last ten or fifteen years the congregation increased so much that the edifice became too small, and in 1912 the present modern church building was erected with a seating capacity of 500. At the present time there are 650 parishioners. Other institutions of the parish are a modern parochial school with ninety-five scholars in regular attendance. The old church building is now used as a parsonage, but plans are under way for the erection of a new building. The modern church is at the corner of First Avenue and Exchange Street, and the other buildings are close by. Father Berthold had practically all the responsibility of looking after this numerous congregation and much of its increase and prosperity have fallen within the period of his individual pastorate. Father Berthold, whose full name...

Biographical Sketch of Richard Thomas

Richard Thomas, farming; P. O. Mattoon; the subject of this sketch was born in Carnarvonshire, North Wales, Great Britain, Dec. 18, 1832. He married Miss Sarah L. Worden Dec. 12, 1853; she was born in Fairfield Co., Conn., March 13, 1836; they had seven children, five living, viz., Robert A., Laura A., Annie May, Mary Alice and Lizzie. He lived in Wales about fifteen years, when he came to the United States with some relatives and settled in Oneida Co., N. Y., where he engaged in farming, remaining about three years, when he moved to Fairfield Co., Conn., where he worked on a farm and followed teaming one year; he then worked in the rolling-mill one year, and then engaged in boating-first running packet from Greenwich to New York, then in freighting, following the business about four years; he then, in 1856, moved to Franklin Co., Ind., where he engaged in farming, and followed same until 1870, when he came to Illinois and settled in Cumberland Co., where he lived about nine months, and, in the fall of 1870, he came to his present place and has lived here since. He has held no office, except connected with the road or school. He owns eighty acres in this township, which he has earned by his own labor and...

Biography of George M. Hoffman

George M. Hoffman, president of the Citizens State Bank of Little River, came to Kansas in territorial times and is one of the oldest residents of the state. His life had been as varied in its activities and experiences as it had been long, and perhaps no individual had contributed more to the real advancement and upbuilding of the Town of Little River than Mr. Hoffman. His birth occurred in Franklin County, Indiana, February 7, 1843, and he is of German ancestry in the paternal line and his paternal grandfather was a German soldier in the magnificent army of Napoleon during the Russian campaign which ended so disastrously after the march to Moscow. His father, Henry Hoffman, was born in Baden, Germany, in 1790, grew up and married in that country, followed agriculture and in 1840 brought his family to the United States and settled on a farm in Franklin County, Indiana, where he died in 1865. After coming to America he never made any definite choice of political parties and usually voted independently. He was a member of the Methodist Episcopal Church. He married in the old country Maria Hornberger, who was born in Baden in 1810. She died in Franklin County, Indiana, in 1875. They had only three children, George M. being the youngest. Katrina, the oldest, married Ed Pape and they live retired at Keokuk, Iowa. Barbara, the other sister, is unmarried and lives at Greeley, Colorado. George M. Hoffman acquired his education in the common schools of Franklin County, Indiana, at a time when most schools were conducted on the subscription plan. His years passed...

Biography of Dr. Wilson Bowlby

DR. WILSON BOWLBY. The office of the physician is one of such primary importance in society, that one who worthily sustains that character for a long time in one place becomes one of the fundamental pillars of the community. If the character of a wise and influential public officer and politician and public-spirited citizen be added to the requirements of the skilled physician, we have a life of the highest usefulness. Such in a general way has been the career of this pioneer physician of Washington county. Though now well advanced in a very busy and wearing life, Doctor Bowlby, as may be seen from his portrait, still retains much of the vigor which in past years enabled him to carry on successfully so many and such varied enterprises. He was born at New Hampton, New Jersey, on the 4th of July, 1818. There he lived till eighteen years of age, when he went to New York City, and was there engaged in a store for two or three years. He was married there in 1841 to Lydia D. Jones of Newark, New Jersey. Soon after he went to Cincinnati to attend medical lectures in the Eclectic Institution. In 1845 he went to Fairfield, Indiana, to practice medicine. In 1852, he came “the plains across” to Oregon. Having spent one year in Portland, he took up a place south of Hillsboro, where he lived until 1860. In that year he removed to Forest Grove, where he has resided continuously, engaged in the practice of medicine, except a period of four years, from 1869 to 1873, in which he was...

Biography of S. S. White

S.S. WHITE. – The pioneer experiences of Judge White are of an exceptionally interesting character. This well-known and highly valued citizen of Portland was born in Franklin county, Indiana, December 14, 1811. His father was much of a frontiersman, and, after a removal to Ohio in 1815, went three years later to Sangamon county, Illinois, settling on Sugar creek, twenty miles south of Springfield. This was then a remote and unoccupied region, Mr. White’s family and those of a Mr. Ellis and Mr. Vancil being the only families within the limits of the present Sangamon and Morgan counties, and sixty miles from white settlements. Various removals were made subsequently within that state. Upon arriving at his majority, young White entered the mercantile business, and continued in it near Galesburg. In 1831 occurred his marriage to Miss Hulda Jennings; and the next year an effort was made in company with Mr. Amzi Doolittle, and M.M. McCarver, so well known as one of our early citizens, to settle on a tract of land soon to be thrown open in consequence of a treaty of relinquishment from the Indians. The land was not to be subject to settlement until June of that year; but, not apprehending any opposition, these men located lands and put up cabins in February, but were removed with much rigor by government troops under Jefferson Davis, then a lieutenant in the United States army; and their cabins were burned. Even a shed build afterwards to protect their household goods while the families were absent in Knox county was destroyed. Nevertheless a claim was secured there and was occupied...

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