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Genealogy of the Yeargan Family 1730-1890

By the personal efforts of Leonidas Hilary Yeargan and Hilary H. L. Yeargan, two second cousins, who are great-grandsons of the original Rev. Andrew Yeargan, these memoirs have been obtained. The descent in this manuscript starts with Rev. Andrew Yeargan, who came from Wales about the year 1735 and settled in Virginia, ministering in the Roanoke and James River Valley. He married Ony Bowles and raised 10 sons and 1 daughter, namely: Andrew Yeargan, settled in South Carolina and raised two children, who’s identity is lost. John Yeargan,resided in Newbury County SC and raised two sons: John and Wiley. Samuel Yeargan,settled first in Newbury County SC and then Franklin County GA. Had at least one daughter, Sallie. Benjamin Yeargan, married Sarah Morgan, and had 4 children: Charlotte, Mark, Harriet and Bartlett. Would spell his name Yeargain. Jarratt F. Yeargan,married Amelia Patterson, and had 8 children: Benjamin, Patterson, Devereaux, Bartlett, Henry, Chesley, Charlotte and Sarah. Edward Yeargan, settled in Anderson County SC where he and his wife were killed by lightening. Raised a large family of children. James Yeargan,died a bachelor at his brother Devereaux’s house in Greenville County SC. Devereaux Yeargan, married and had the following sons: Andrew, Benjamin, Steven, Rufus and William. Bartlett Yeargan, married and had the following sons: Benjamin, William, Jarratt, Bartlett and Gideon. His descendants would spell their name as Yeargin. Williams Yeargan,married a Miss Bennett, and had the following sons: John, James, Philip and Bennett. His descendants lived in Illinois. Sarah Yeargan, married Burrell Hudson and raised a large family. Early in the 19th century finds Rev. Andrew and Ony Bowles in Greenville South...

Biography of Capt. James Berrien Harper

CAPT. JAMES BERRIEN HARPER. He whose name heads this sketch is one of the substantial citizens and successful agriculturists of Barren Creek Township, Baxter County, Arkansas, but was born in Franklin County, Ga., November 17, 1833, a son of Andrew Knox and Anna (Little) Harper, natives of Virginia and Georgia, respectively. When a young man the father went to Georgia and was married in Franklin County, and in 1839 moved to Pontotoc County, Miss., where he made his home until his death in 1851, at the age of fifty-six years, his wife having died in Pontotoc County when forty-one years old. The father was a successful business man, was original and independent in his views, and was an active and earnest member of the Methodist Church. Six children were born to himself and wife, only two of whom are now living: James Berrien and Hattie T. (Bacon). the latter residing on Florida coast. The Harpers are of Irish origin. Capt. James Berrien Harper was educated in the common schools of Pontotoc County, and since his sixteenth year he has had the cares of a family on his shoulders, for after the death of his father, he took his place as well as he could and cared for the younger members of the family. In January, 1862, he enlisted in Company E, of the Third Mississippi Infantry, but after the capture of Ft. Donelson he became a part of the Forty-third Mississippi Infantry, and was elected first lieutenant of Company E, just before Gen. Grant closed the lines around Vicksburg. He was also at Corinth. Abbeville and Grenada, was in...

Biography of Joseph M. Henley

JOSEPH M. HENLEY is one of the most prominent, enterprising and progressive tillers of the soil in Buckhorn Township, and his residence on Gobler Flat. He was born in Franklin County, Ga., in 1847, but his father, John S. Henley, was born in Washington County, Tennessee He was a minister of the Methodist Church and preached the gospel in his native State, Virginia, West Virginia, Georgia, North Carolina and South Carolina until his death in 1865, at about the age of seventy years. He supported the principles of the Democrat party throughout life, and at two different times represented Rabun County, Ga., in the State Legislature During the Civil War he was a Union man. He was well educated, mainly by his own efforts, and by trade was a cabinet maker. He sold goods in North Carolina and Georgia, and was shrewd and successful in the conduct of his affairs, but was always generous in the use of his means, and being sympathetic, kind-hearted and charitable, no one ever left his house hungry nor in sore want. He was married three times: first to Mary Syller, then to Mary E. Patton, and afterward to Minerva Mclntire, the last mentioned being the mother of the subject of this sketch. Mr. Henly now says he received his education in the Confederate Army, for he entered the service when he was but fifteen years old, becoming a member of the Fourteenth Georgia Infantry. On account of disability he was discharged from active service, and was then on detail at Athens, Ga., from December, 1864, until the surrender. He was at Atlanta during...

Slave Narrative of Boston Blackwell

Interviewer: Beaulah Sherwood Hagg Person Interviewed: Boston Blackwell Age: 98 Location: 320 Plum, North Little Rock, Arkansas Make yourself comfoble, miss. I can’t see you much ’cause my eyes, they is dim. My voice, it kinder dim too. I knows my age, good. Old Miss, she told me when I got sold—”Boss, you is 13—borned Christmas. Be sure to tell your new misses and she put you down in her book.” My borned name was Pruitt ’cause I got borned on Robert Pruitt’s plantation in Georgia,—Franklin County, Georgia. But Blackwell, it my freed name. You see, miss, after my mammy got sold down to Augusta—I wish’t I could tell you the man what bought her, I ain’t never seed him since,—I was sold to go to Arkansas; Jefferson county, Arkansas. Then was when old Miss telled me I am 13. It was before the Civil War I come here. The onliest auction of slaves I ever seed was in Memphis, coming on to Arkansas. I heerd a girl bid off for $800. She was about fifteen, I reckon. I heerd a woman—a breeding woman, bid off for $1500. They always brought good money. I’m telling you, it was when we was coming from Atlanta. Do you want to hear how I runned away and joined the Yankees? You know Abraham Lincoln ‘claired freedom in ’63, first day of January. In October ’63, I runned away and went to Pine Bluff to get to the Yankees. I was on the Blackwell plantation south of Pine Bluff in ’63. They was building a new house; I wanted to feel some putty...

Biography of F.C. Bramlet

A pioneer to this state, and a man who has wrought in all the occupations incident to the pioneer’s life, being also attended with many hardships, the subject of this sketch is today one of the most respected and admired residents of Wallowa county, and we are pleased to accord to him a representation in this volume that purports to chronicle the events of the history of the county and also the lives of its leading citizens, since he has been a potent factor in the establishment of the institutions of the county, and has been a faithful supporter of good government here for thirty years, while his personal qualifications eminently fit him for the prominent place that he holds in the esteem of his fellows. In 1827 F. C. Bramlet was born in Franklin County, Georgia, being the son of Nathan and Jane (Gober) Bramlet. When he was six months old his parents came to McMinn county, Tennessee, and in 1833 they removed thence to the Cherokee purchase and in 1843 came to southwestern Missouri. It was as early as in 1852 that they joined the army that was wending its way toward the Pacific coast. The train was attacked with the cholera, and the parents died on the banks of the Snake River, within three days of each other, sixteen of the party died and our subject came near passing away. He was left with three sisters and two brothers to care for. They wended their way on the rest of their sad journey and settled in Yam Hill County. There Mr. Bramlet took up the occupation...

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