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Biography of C. K. Merriam, M.D.

C.K. MERRIAM, M.D. – Mr. Merriam was born June 29, 1848, in Houlton, Aroostook County, Maine, being the eighth child in a family of ten children, the third and fourth being girls. His father, Lewis Merriam, when a young man, went from New Salem, Massachusetts, to Maine, in 1832, and married and settled in Houlton in 1833. He is now eighty-two years old, and is coming West this summer. The parents were poor, and lived on a farm two miles from the village. In early childhood he was taught to pick wool, quill yarn, etc., as the wool of the farm was manufactured into garments in the family mill, the motive power of which was supplied principally by his mother; and with boyish impatience he watched his father make his first pair of shoes by candle light. If a book, slate, or pocket money for a Fourth of July celebration were needed, the wild strawberry patch frequently contributed the means. If a handsled, cart or miniature mill were desired, it was found in the workshop over the woodshed after a few days’ work with the lumber and tools; while the yearly sugar camp in the maple grove furnished amusement for the boys as well as syrup for the family. The farm was sold; and the family moved about two miles to a sawmill which the father built on the north branch of the Meduxnekeag, where they remained a short time, until the mill was sold to the oldest son in 1861. The family move again to a farm having an old up-and-down sawmill in Hayesville, Maine, about twenty-five miles...

Biography of James H. Harte

A well known real-estate and insurance agent of Coeur d’Alene, Idaho, is James H. Harte, who was born in Connecticut, near the city of Hartford. July 25, 1854, his parents being Walter and Elizabeth (Gibson) Harte, both of whom were natives of Connecticut, in which state the father died when about fifty-five years of age, while the mother still makes her home there. Mr. Harte of this review pursued his education in the public schools of Plainville, and Hartford. Connecticut. He then entered upon his business career as a clerk in a drygoods store in Hartford, where he remained for four years, after which he conducted operations along the same line until 1878. He then enlisted in the regular army as a member of Company C, Second United States Infantry, and after serving for five years was honorably discharged, November 8, 1883, at Fort Spokane, having in the meantime attained the rank of first sergeant. After leaving the army Mr. Harte served for three years as bookkeeper for the post trader at Fort Spokane and then came to Coeur d’Alene, in the winter of 1886. For one year he was engaged in general merchandising in this town, and since the spring of 1888 has been engaged in the real estate and insurance business. In 1885 was celebrated his marriage to Miss Amelia R. Brooks, a native of Boston, Massachusetts, and they have one child, Margaret. In his political affiliations Mr. Harte is a Republican and keeps well informed on the issues of the day, thus being qualified to give an intelligent support to the party of his choice. He...

Biography of James Birnie

JAMES BIRNIE. – Mr. Birnie was a Scotchman by birth. He was born at Paisley, county Renfrew, Scotland, in the year 1800. In 1816 the ambitious lad left his native health and emigrated to Montreal, Canada. Here, under the tutelage of a Catholic priest, he studied the French language for about two years, at the end of which time he entered the employ of the Northwest Fur Company as one of its clerks, and was sent across the Rocky Mountains to Fort Spokane, where he arrived towards the close of 1818. The fort at this time was in charge of a Mr. Haldin, with whom Mr. Birnie remained for several years. He then went to the Kootenai country, where he was married to the daughter of a Frenchman, a Mr. Bianlien, from Manitoba. Here he spent several years trading with the Indians, buying furs, etc., and then returned to Fort Spokane. In 1821 the Northwest and Hudson’s Bay Company amalgamated as one concern. In 1824 Dr. McLoughlin removed a part of the forces at Astoria up the Columbia river and established Fort Vancouver. During this year, or the beginning of 1825, Mr. Birnie was appointed Indian trader and bookkeeper for the consolidated companies, then known as the Hudson’s Bay Company, and was stationed at Vancouver, where he remained until 1831. He was then sent to the Northwest coast to succeed Captain Simpson, deceased, and to complete the building of Fort Simpson, which work he speedily accomplished. After several years service at Fort Simpson, he returned to Astoria, and for a second time took charge of that trading post. It...

Biography of Frank Johnson

FRANK JOHNSON. – The career of this well-known contractor is a clear case of the promotion of merit. He has acquired an enviable position in the business world from simple integrity and excellence of worth. He was born in Holland in 1844, and came with his widowed mother to New York in 1852. He went soon to Buffalo, and there began to learn the trade of a carpenter and joiner. The war breaking out, and an appeal being made to the patriotic young men of the city, he volunteered as a soldier and served gallantly until the close of the struggle, meriting and receiving special mention by the colonel of the regiment. He saw severe work both in the West and South and at sea, and was wounded in a skirmish on the line of the Mobile & Charleston Railway. Being mustered out at Albany in 1866, he returned home and continued his studies as architect with Frederick Scott, one of the master mechanics of the city. In 1874 he began business on his own of the city. In 1874 he began business on his own responsibility, and made a specialty of first-class work and of overseeing construction. Tiring, however, of the city, and desiring to try the real American life of the West, he came to Washington Territory in 1880, and took up a farm in the Palouse country, using his soldier’s right to a claim of one hundred and sixty acres. He began in earnest, fencing sixty acres, and plowing thirty the first year. But “his light could not be hid.” A settler, who had made money...

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