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Biographical Sketch of Dr. George Shimoon

(See Oolootsa) Gertrude Whitman, daughter of Connell and Florence (Nash) Rogers, was born July 11, 1879. Educated in the Cherokee public schools and Female Seminary, graduating from the latter on June 24, 1897. Married at Fort Gibson March 24, 1908, Dr. George Shimoon, D. D. S., born Dec. 18, 1878, in Burmia, Persia. Educated in Missionary College and Knox College, Gilesbeury, Illinois and graduated from Indiana Dental College. They are the parents of Miriam Shimoon, born August 14, 1912. Mrs. Gertrude W. Shimoon died April 11,...

Biographical Sketch of Mrs. Lou G. Howell

(See Cordery, Grant, Ghigau and Oolootsa)-Lou Gott Harris, born at Ft. Gibson July 31, 1886, educated at Nowata High school and Oswego, Kansas, graduated from the former; She was married January 7, 1905 to Dr. Dumont D. Howell, born January 14, 187 4 in Murphy, North Carolina, graduated from the Nashville Medical College in 1903. Died December 6, 1919; he was a Mason and Elk. They are the parents of: Sue Catherine, born April 25, 1906. Alfred Dumont, born April. 30, 1908; Lucile Genevieve, born December 2, 1912 and Margaret Imogene, born December 2, 1914. Charles Joseph Harris, born April 1848, married Emma J. Walker. He died January 30, 1892. They were the parents of Mrs. Lou...

Biography of J. Homer McCall, M. D.

Dr. J. Homer McCall, physician and surgeon of Fort Gibson, was born in De Kalb county, Illinois, April 2, 1859, and is a son of Alfred and Catherine (Durham) McCall, who were natives of Ohio and of New York respectively. The father was of Scotch-Irish descent, while the mother came of German lineage. In early manhood Alfred McCall devoted his life to the ministry but later became a railroad promoter and was active in connection with the building of the Florida, Memphis & Columbia River Railroad, which is now a part of the Santa Fe system. He was also active in promoting the Neosho Dam project at Chanute, Kansas. At an early day he went to De Kalb County, Illinois, where he acted as minister for the Methodist church and later he became presiding elder of the Rock River conference. Subsequently he removed to Kansas, residing at Galesburg, that state, to the time of his death. During the Civil war period he acted as recruiting officer for the government. On one occasion he was urged to accept the nomination for governor of Kansas on the republican ticket but declined the proffered honor. He died in 1875 at the age of fifty-six years, while his widow long survived, passing away in 1917 at the advanced age of ninety years. Dr. McCall was reared and educated at the Osage mission in Kansas, at what is now the town of St. Paul. He afterward took up the profession of teaching, which he followed in Kansas for seven terms, and later he went to Ann Arbor, Michigan, where he entered upon the study...

Biography of Edward D. Hicks

Edward D. Hicks is numbered among Tahlequah’s representative business men and is one whose life record should be a stimulus to the effort and ambition of others. He was born at Fort Gibson, Indian Territory, on the 1st of January, 1866, a son of Daniel R. and Nancy J. (Rider) Hicks. His grandfather on the paternal side Elijah Hicks, was chief of the Cherokee Nation in Georgia and Indian Territory and died in 1856. Mr. and Mrs. Hicks came with the immigration of Cherokees in 1837 and 1838 to Indian Territory and the father became a successful farmer and stock raiser. He was influential in political and tribal affairs and for some time acted as United States interpreter. His death occurred in 1883. His wife died in 1866. Edward D. Hicks, whose name initiates this review, was the only child born to their union. In the acquirement of an education Edward D. Hicks attended the public schools of the Cherokee Nation and in due time enrolled as a student in the University of Arkansas at Fayetteville. Upon the completion of his education he made his initial step into the business world as clerk in a mercantile establishment and after several years in that connection determined to start into business on his own account. He was active in the conduct of a mercantile business until 1895, but in that year organized the Cherokee Telephone Company, operating a line between Tahlequah and Muskogee, and in 1896 local service was established in Tahlequah. In 1905 the Cherokee Telephone Company was absorbed by the Southwest Bell Telephone Company and Mr. Hicks was retained...

Biography of Grover P. Watkins

Grover P. Watkins, engaged in the practice of law at Fort Gibson, was born at Carrollton, Arkansas, August 23, 1886, and is a son of Paschal T. and Eliza (Holt) Watkins, who were also natives of Arkansas. The father was a druggist and also a farmer, devoting his attention to the two lines of business at Carrollton. He served as a soldier throughout the Civil war with the Confederate forces and became an officer of the army. He died November 11, 1905, and is still survived by his wife, who makes her home in Green Forest, Arkansas. Grover P. Watkins was reared and educated in Carrollton and at the age of seventeen years began teaching school. He followed that profession for eight or nine years and during that time he devoted the hours which are usually termed leisure to the study of law. It was his desire to become an active practitioner at the bar and to this end he matriculated in the Chicago Law school, from which he was graduated with the class of 1903. He afterward went to Harrison, Arkansas, where he practiced for four years, and in 1917 he went to Muskogee. Here he was admitted to practice before the Supreme Court in 1918 and before the United States federal court in 1919. He formed a partnership with his uncle, John Watkins, who conducts the Muskogee office of the firm, while in June, 1920, Grover P. Watkins removed to Fort Gibson and opened an office, although he is still a member of the firm of Watkins & Watkins. On the 1st of June, 1920, Grover P....

Biography of Francis Marion Crowell

Afton owes much to the enterprising spirit and business ability of Francis Marion Crowell, whose identification with the town dates from the time of its establishment, and he is now conducting one of the leading department stores in this part of the state, displaying marked executive force, energy and determination in the control of his interests. He was born on a farm in Tallapoosa County, Alabama, March 14, 1859, his parents being Dr. Marion and Nancy A. Crowell, the former of whom was born at Mecklenburg, North Carolina, February 15, 1830, while the birth of the latter occurred in Henry County, Georgia, on the 14th of April, 1835. The father was a large landowner of Alabama and was numbered with the medical fraternity of that state until after the close of the Civil war, during which period, in common with many other residents of the south, he suffered heavy business reverses. In 1875 he went to Conway County, Arkansas, where he purchased a farm and also continued to follow his profession. In association with his sons he later engaged in merchandising at Solgohachia, in that County, where his demise occurred. He took a leading part in all projects for the development of his community, building with his own funds the first schoolhouse in the town, while his home was used as a house of worship by both the Methodist and Congregational denominations. He was a progressive, public spirited citizen and one of the most highly respected pioneers in Conway County. His son, Francis M. Crowell, was the youngest in a family of five children and his education was largely...

Biography of Q. B. Boydstun

Q. B. Boydstun, attorney-at-law, practicing as a member of the firm of Mountecastle & Boydstun at Fort Gibson, Muskogee County, is a native son of Oklahoma, his birth having occurred at Caddo, Bryan County, December 8, 198. His parents were R. B. and A. R. (Massengill) Boydstun, the former a native of Tennessee, while the latter was born in Texas. The father is a rancher and stock-man, who came to the Indian Territory with his parents in the year 1872 and has since given his attention to the management of his ranch and to stock raising. For the past twenty-four years he has lived in Bryan County and prior to that period resided in the Cherokee strip. Q. B. Boydstun, spending his youthful days under the parental roof, completed his public school education by study in the Caddo high school and afterward entered the University of Oklahoma in preparation for the bar. He was graduated with the law class of June 10, 1919. He then came to Fort Gibson, where he entered into partnership with R. M. Mountecastle and through the intervening period they have practiced continuously and successfully. Mr. Boydstun was the youngest man to graduate in law from the State University up to that time and not having attained his majority it was necessary for him to secure a permit to practice. He was admitted to the bar in March, 1920, and has since followed his profession, making steady advance, the cases which he has tried demonstrating his ability to cope with the intricate and involved problems of the law. His partner, Mr. Mountcastle, is United States...

Biography of J. C. Bushyhead, M. D.

One of Claremore’s pioneer citizens, who has tirelessly devoted his energies to the development of the town along the various lines is Dr. J. C. Bushyhead, who first located here some thirty-one years ago. During the long period of his residence here he has been engaged in the active practice of his chosen profession and has won for himself an enviable position among the foremost physicians and surgeons of northeastern Oklahoma. A native of Indian Territory, he was born at Fort Gibson on the 29th of June, 1870, a son of Dennis Bushyhead, who was chief of the Cherokee Indians from 1879 to 1886 and prior to that was treasurer of the nation. He was also, for many years, a delegate to Washington, D. C., in the interests of the nation. Aside from his political interests, Dennis Bushyhead was a farmer and conducted a mercantile business. In 1849 the year of the gold rush to California he went to that country and followed mining, being superintendent of the construction of ditches for mining purposes. He was active in that capacity for Judge Terry, who later became famous through the fighting of a duel which is now set down in history. Mr. Bushyhead returned to Indian Territory in 1868, however, and soon after that became prominent in the affairs of the Cherokee Nation. His demise occurred at Tahlequah in 1898, and came as a severe blow to his family and many friends. His brother, Edward Bushyhead, was one of the founders of the San Diego Union, at that time the leading paper of San Diego county; California, of which Douglas...
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