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The French and Indian War from 1754 to 1759 – Beaver Wars

After the peace, concluded between France and England in 1748, the French, excluded from the Atlantic coast of North America, designed to take possession of the country further west, and for this purpose, commenced to build a chain of forts to connect the St. Lawrence and the Mississippi rivers. The English, to prevent this scheme from being carried into action, formed an Ohio company, to whom a considerable extent of country was granted by the English government. Upon hearing of this, the governor of Canada notified the governors of New York and Pennsylvania, that if the English traders came upon the western territory, they would be seized or killed. This menace did not divert the Ohio company from prosecuting its design of surveying the country as far as the falls in the Ohio river. While Mr. Gist was making that survey for the company, some French parties, with their Indians, seized three British traders, and carried them to Presque Isle, on Lake Erie, where a strong fort was then erecting. The British, alarmed at this capture, retired to the Indian towns for shelter; and the Twightwees, resenting the violence done to their allies, assembled, to the number of five hundred or six hundred, scoured the woods, and, finding three French traders, sent them to Pennsylvania. The French determined to persist; built a strong fort, about fifteen miles south of the former, on one of the branches of the Ohio; and another still, at the confluence of the Ohio and Wabache; and thus completed their long projected communication between the mouth of the Mississippi and the river St. Lawrence. Thus...

Treaty of September 3, 1822

Articles of a Treaty entered into and concluded at Fort Armstrong, by and between Thomas Forsyth, Agent of Indian Affairs, authorized on the part of the United States for that purpose, of the one part, and the Chiefs, Warriors, and Head Men, of the United Sac and Fox Tribes, for themselves and their Tribes, of the other part. Whereas by the ninth article of the Treaty made and entered into between the United States and the Sac and Fox Tribes of Indians, concluded and signed at Saint Louis, in the District of Louisiana, on the third day of November, one thousand eight hundred and four, it is stipulated, in order to put a stop to the abuses and impositions which are practiced upon the said Tribes by the private traders, the United States will, at a convenient time, establish a trading house or factory, where the individuals of the said Tribes can be supplied with goods at a more reasonable rate than they have been accustomed to procure them. Now, We, the said Chiefs, Warriors, and head men of the said Tribes, for and in consideration of the sum of one thousand dollars to us, now paid in merchandise out of the United States’ Factory, by said Thomas Forsyth, on behalf of the United States, the receipt whereof is hereby acknowledged, do exonerate, release, and forever discharge, the United States from the obligation contained in the said ninth article above recited, and the aforesaid ninth article is, from the date hereof, abrogated and of no effect. In witness whereof, the said Thomas Forsyth, and the chiefs, warriors, and head...

Treaty of September 15, 1832

Articles of a treaty made and concluded, at Fort Armstrong, Rock Island, Illinois, between the United States of America, by their Commissioners, Major General Winfield Scott of the United States’ Army, and his Excellency John Reynolds, Governor of the State of Illinois, and the Winnebago nation of Indians, represented in general Council by the undersigned Chiefs, Headmen, and Warriors. Article I.The Winnebago nation hereby cede to the United States, forever, all the lands, to which said nation have title or claim, lying to the south and east of the Wisconsin river, and the Fox river of Green Bay; bounded as follows, viz: beginning at the mouth of the Pee-keetol a-ka river; thence up Rock river to its source; thence, with a line dividing the Winnebago nation from other Indians east of the Winnebago lake, to the Grande Chûte; thence, up Fox river to the Winnebago lake, and with the northwestern shore of said lake, to the inlet of Fox river; thence, up said river to lake Puckaway, and with the eastern shore of the same to its most southeasterly bend; thence with the line of a purchase made of the Winnebago nation, by the treaty at Prairie du Chêne, the first day of August, one thousand eight hundred and twenty-nine, to the place of beginning. Article II.In part consideration of the above cession, it is hereby stipulated and agreed, that the United States grant to the Winnebago nation, to be held as other Indian lands are held, that part of the tract of country on the west side of the Mississippi, known, at present, as the Neutral ground, embraced...

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