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Slave Narrative of Lindsey Moore

Interviewer: Martin Richardson Person Interviewed: Lindsey Moore Location: Palatka, Florida Age: 87 Occupation: Blacksmith, leather-tanner, ex-marble shooting champion, weaving-and-spinning An Ex-Slave Who Was Resourceful In a little blacksmith shop at 1114 Madison Street, Palatka, is a busy little horse-shoer who was born in slavery eighty-seven years ago. “Lindsey Moore”, blacksmith, leather-tanner ex-marble shooting champion and a number of other things, represents one of the most resourceful former slaves yet found in the state. Moore was born in 1850 on the plantation of John B. Overtree, in Forsythe County, Georgia. He was one of the six children of Eliza Moore; all of them remained the property of Overtree until freed. On the Overtree plantation the slave children were allowed considerable time for play until their tenth or twelfth years; Lindsey took full advantage of this opportunity and became very skillful at marble-shooting. It was here that he first learned to utilize his talents profitably. ‘Massa Overtree’ discovered the ability of Lindsey and another urchin to shoot marbles, and began taking them into town to compete with the little slaves of other owners. There would be betting on the winners. Mr. Overtree won some money in this manner, Lindsey and his companion being consistent winners. But Lindsey saw possibilities other than the glory of his victories in this new game; with pennies that some of the spectators tossed him he began making small wagers of his own with his competitors, and soon had amassed quite a small pile of silver for those days. Although shoes were unheard-of in Lindsey’s youth, he used to watch carefully whenever a cow was skinned and...

Biography of Joseph Rogers

Joseph Rogers, son of Sarah and John Rogers, left his beautiful farm in Milton County, formerly Forsythe County, situated on the Duluth road, twenty-seven miles from Atlanta, Georgia, and came to the west. He took up his residence at a place now called Lowell, Kansas, three miles east of Baxter Springs, where Shoal creek empties into Spring River, in that part of the country then known as the Neutral Land. He improved a fine farm of four or five hundred acres, built the first house and had the first library in the state of Kansas. The old solid walnut bookcase is now owned by his granddaughter, Mrs. Ellen Howard Miller, of Bartlesville. He was a polished gentleman of fine education and was a warm personal friend of the late General Stand Watie. While absent from home on a political mission preparatory to going as a delegate to Washington, D. C., in the interests of his country, Joseph Rogers was taken sick and died after a brief illness, being then in the prime of life. He had married Hannah Foster, who left her home of ease and comfort in Georgia to brave with him the wilds of western life. She was a daughter of Elijah Foster and a grand-daughter of William Foster, a soldier of the Revolutionary war. The Foster family is an ancient and noble one, whose lineage is traced back to the year 1873, and some of its representatives married into the family of William the Conqueror and that of Charles II, king of France, who was the son of Louis I, known as the Pious King. Bamborough...

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