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Biographical Sketch of Miss Mary K. Rogers

(See Cordery and Daniel) Henry Curtis Rogers, born in 1825. Married Louisa Jane Thompson nee Blackburn, born in 1823. She died November 30, 1883 and he died February 3, 1896. They were the parents of: Mary Kinney; Catherine who married Isaac Newton Strickland; Lucy P. who married William Ridge Rogers; Eugene Overby who married William Rufus Greer; William Henry, elected Treasurer of Rogers County 1907 and 1910 and County Commissioner of the same county; and Stonewall Jackson Rogers. Miss Mary Kinney Rogers is a graduate from the Moravian School of Salem, N. C. Mrs. Eugenic Oglesby Greer was President of the East Oklahoma Woman’s Missionary Society for three years. She is still actively engaged in missionary...

Slave Narrative of Wade Glenn

Interviewer: Miriam Logan Person Interviewed: Wade Glenn Location: Lebanon, Ohio Date of Birth: October 30th Miriam Logan, Reporter Lebanon, Ohio Warren County, District 21 Story of WADE GLENN from Winston-Salem North Carolina: (doesn’t know his age) “Yes Madam, I were a slave-I’m old enough to have been born into slavery, but I was only a baby slave, for I do not remember about slavery, I’ve just heard them tell about it. My Mammy were Lydia Glenn, and father were Caesar Glenn, for they belonged to old Glenn. I’ve heard tell he were a mean man too. My birthday is October 30th-but what year-I don’t know. There were eight brothers and two sisters. We lived on John Beck’s farm-a big farm, and the first work for me to do was picking up chips o’ wood, and lookin’ after hogs. “In those days they’d all kinds of work by hand on the farm. No Madam, no cotton to speak of, or tobacco then. Just farmin’ corn, hogs, wheat fruit,-like here. Yes Madam, that was all on John Beck’s farm except the flax and the big wooley sheep. Plenty of nice clean flax-cloth suits we all had. “Beck wasn’t so good-but we had enough to eat, wear, and could have our Saturday afternoon to go to town, and Sunday for church. We sho did have church, large meetin’-camp meetin’-with lot of singin’ an shoutin’ and it was fine! Nevah was no singer, but I was a good dancer in my day, yes-yes Madam I were a good dancer. I went to dances and to church with my folks. My father played a...

Slave Narrative of Aunt Betty Cofer

Interviewer: Esther S. Pinnix Person Interviewed: Betty Cofer Location: North Carolina Date of Birth: 1856 Age: 81 Negro Folk Lore Of The Piedmont. Sources of Information: Aunt Betty Cofer–ex-slave of Dr. Beverly Jones The ranks of negro ex-slaves are rapidly thinning out, but, scattered here and there among the ante-bellum families of the South, may be found a few of these picturesque old characters. Three miles north of Bethania, the second oldest settlement of the “Unitas Fratrum” in Wachovia, lies the 1500 acre Jones plantation. It has been owned for several generations by the one family, descendants of Abraham Conrad. Conrad’s daughter, Julia, married a physician of note, Dr. Beverly Jones, whose family occupied the old homestead at the time of the Civil War. Here, in 1856, was born a negro girl, Betty, to a slave mother. Here, today, under the friendly protection of this same Jones family, surrounded by her sons and her sons’ sons, lives this same Betty in her own little weather-stained cottage. Encircling her house are lilacs, althea, and flowering trees that soften the bleak outlines of unpainted out-buildings. A varied collection of old-fashioned plants and flowers crowd the neatly swept dooryard. A friendly German-shepherd puppy rouses from his nap on the sunny porch to greet visitors enthusiastically. In answer to our knock a gentle voice calls, “Come in.” The door opens directly into a small, low-ceilinged room almost filled by two double beds. These beds are conspicuously clean and covered by homemade crocheted spreads. Wide bands of hand-made insertion ornament the stiffly starched pillow slips. Against the wall is a plain oak dresser. Although...

Lee, Bertha Pearl Armfield – Obituary

Mrs. Bertha Pearl Lee, 58, wife of Harvey Lee, for more than 50 years a resident of the Diamond and Colfax communities, died at 12:45 a.m. Thursday [October 26, 1939] at her home, N210 Mill Street, following an illness of 19 months. Funeral services will be held Sunday at 2 p.m. at the Baptist Church here, the Rev. Mrs. E. M. Leisher and the Rev. E. C. Newham officiating. Members of the Pythias Sisters Lodge will attend in a body. Burial will be in Colfax Cemetery. Mrs. Lee was born to Mr. and Mrs. J. F. Armfield at Winston, N.C., and at the age of 6 came with her parents to Diamond, where she was married to Mr. Lee on October 24, 1900. With Mr. Lee, she moved to Colfax 11 years ago. She was a member of the Methodist Church and had been active in the work of the Baptist Church. Besides her widower, she is survived by her father and mother, the latter being critically ill in a hospital in Everett at the time of her daughter’s death; one son, Burton, Colfax; two daughters, Mrs. Ralph Rose, Pullman, and Mrs. J. D. Anderson, Long Beach, Calif.; two brothers, Fred Armfield, Whitehall, Mont., and Allen Armfield, Portland, and two sisters, Mrs. M. J. Williams, Seattle, and Mrs. Glen Baker, Everett. Mrs. Anderson will arrive here Saturday evening. Mrs. A. C. Palmer, a sister-in-law, arrived Thursday morning from Harlan, Ore. Contributed by: Shelli...

D. George Seampulos

Private 1st Class, 25th Co. Inf.; of Forsyth County; son of David and Mattie Seampulos. Husband of Ruth McClendon Seampulos. Entered service August 24, 1918, at Hampton, Va. Sent to Camp Lee, Va. Transferred to Camp Dix, N. J. Mustered out at Camp Greene, N.C., Jan. 7,...

Marshall E. Woollen

Sergt., Co. F, 105th Engineers, 30th Div. Son of J. W. and Mrs. Emma Woollen, of Forsyth County, and husband of Grace Woollen. Entered service June 24, 1916, at Charlotte, N.C. Sent to Camp Greene. Transferred to Camp Sevier, then to Camp Mills. Sailed for France April, 1918. Fought with his regiment in Belgium and France. Returned to U. S. April, 1919. Mustered out of the service at Camp Jackson, April,...

Bryan W. Woollen

Sergt., Co. F, 105th Engineers, 30th Div. Son of J. W. and Mrs. Emma Woollen, of Forsyth County, and husband of Myrtle Woollen. Entered service June 4, 1916, at Charlotte, N.C. Sent to Camp Greene, then to Camp Sevier, then Camp Mills, and sailed for France April, 1918. Fought in Belgium and France; wounded at offensive on Somme Front by shell in the leg, Oct. 8, 1918. Sent to U. S. Hospital No. 21, at Paignton So Devon, England. Returned to U. S. Dec. 22, 1918. Mustered out at Camp Gordon, August,...

Clarence V. Wood

1st Class Private, Co. H, 81st Div., 321st Inf.; son of L. D. and Sarah Wood, of Forsyth County. Entered service May 25, 1918, at Winston-Salem, N.C. Was sent to Camp Jackson, S. C., transferred to Camp Sevier, S. C., then to Camp Upton, N. Y. Was sent to France Aug. 11, 1918. Fought at Meuse-Argonne offensive, St. Die and Vosges Mtn. Sector. Landed in the USA June 20, 1919. Mustered out at Camp Lee, Va., June 29,...

F. S. Orrell

Private, F. A., 22nd Batt., 8th Reg. Born in Forsyth County; son of Mr. G. W. and Mrs. Alice Orrell. Husband of Mrs. Elizabeth Rich Orrell. Entered service August 28, 1918, at Winston-Salem, N.C. Sent to Camp Jackson. Transferred to Camp Hill, Va. Mustered out at Camp Jackson, S. C., Dec. 9,...

Mathew J. Pappas

Cook, A. G. Dept. Lives in Forsyth County and son of Jeremiah and Alony Pappas. Entered the service at Winston-Salem, N.C., August 21, 1918, and sent to Camp Jackson, S. C. Transferred to Camp Mills and from there to Camp Merritt. Promoted cook January, 1919. Mustered out of the service at Camp Lee, Va., Aug. 28,...
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