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Slave Narrative of Diana Alexander

Interviewer: Miss Irene Robertson Person Interviewed: Diane Alexander Location: Brinkley, Arkansas Age: 74 Occupation: Worked in field, Washed, Ironed “I was born in Mississippi close to Bihalia. Our owner was Myers(?) Bogan. He had a wife and children. Mama was a field woman. Her name was Sarah Bogan and papa’s name was Hubberd Bogan. “I heard them talk about setting the pot at the doors and having singing and prayer services. They all sung and prayed around the room. I forgot all the things they talked about. My parents lived on the same place after freedom a long time. They said he was good to them. “Dr. Bogan in Forrest City, Arkansas always said I was his brother’s child. He was dead years ago, so I didn’t have no other way of knowing. “The only thing I can recollect about the War was once my mistress took me and her own little girl upstairs in a kind of ceiling room (attic). They had their ham meat and jewelry locked up in there and other fine stuff. She told us to sit down and not move, not even grunt. Me and Fannie had to be locked up so long. It was dark. We both went to sleep but we was afraid to stir. The Yankees come then but I didn’t get to see them. I didn’t want to be took away by ’em. I was big enough to know that. I heard ’em say we was near ’bout eat out at the closing of the War. I thought it muster been the Yankees from what they was talking about, eating...

Slave Narrative of Sophie D. Belle

Interviewer: Miss Irene Robertson Location: Forrest City, Arkansas Age: 77 “I was born near Knoxville, Georgia. My mother was a professional pastry cook. She was a house woman during slavery. She was owned by Lewis Hicks and Ann Hicks. They had Saluda, Mary, Lewis, and Oscar. “Mother was never sold. Mr. Hicks reared her. She was three-fourths Indian. Her father was George Hicks. Gordon carried him to Texas. Mr. Bob Gordon was mean. He asked Mr. Hicks to keep mother and auntie while he went to Texas, Mr. Gordon was so mean. My mother had two little girls but my sister died while small. “I never saw any one sold. I never saw a soldier. But I noticed the grown people whispering many times. Mother explained it to me, they had some news from the War. Aunt Jane said she saw them pass in gangs. I heard her say, ‘Did you see the soldiers pass early this morning?’ I was asleep. Sometimes I was out at play when they passed. “Master Hicks called us all up at dinner one day to the big house. He told us, ‘You are free as I am.’ I never had worked any then. No, they cried and went on to their homes. Aunt Jane was bad to speak out, she was so much Indian. She had three children. She went to another place to live. She was in search of her husband and thought he might be there at Ft. Valley. “Mother stayed on another year. Mr. Hicks was good to us. None of the children ever worked till they was ten or...

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