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Anderson, Josephine Lois – Obituary

La Grande, Oregon Josephine “Jo” Anderson, 83, of La Grande, died Monday at a local care center. A graveside service will begin at 2 p.m. Wednesday at the Grandview Cemetery. Memorial contributions may be made to the Trinity Baptist Church. Daniels-Knopp Funeral, Cremation & Life Celebration Center is in charge of arrangements. A full obituary will be available later. The Observer – August 26, 2008 __________________________________________ Josephine Lois “Jo” Anderson, 83, of La Grande, died Aug. 25 at a local care center. A graveside service will begin at 2 p.m. today at Grandview Cemetery. Daniels-Knopp Funeral, Cremation & Life Celebration Center is in charge of arrangements. Jo was born June 23, 1925, to Daniel and Effie (Millican) Garinger in Omaha, Neb. She was educated in Colorado Springs and married West Anderson Nov. 11, 1943. They lived in various places and she owned and operated restaurants in Florence, Ariz., and in Oklahoma. In the late spring of 1974 the couple moved to La Grande. She worked various jobs. Her last, when she was in her 70s, was for Dave’s Grocery as the ice cream lady. Jo was a member of Trinity Baptist Church. The 700 Club and Billy Graham were a big part of her life. She enjoyed knitting, crocheting and was known as the “QVC Queen’’ by her family. She gardened and canned and loved spending time with her grandchildren. Survivors include her sons, Dan Anderson of La Grande and Jim Watson of Marion, Mont.; brothers, Dave Garinger of Spokane, Lloyd Garinger of Ritter and Harry Garinger of La Grande; sister, Pauline Henry of Wenatchee, Wash.; seven grandchildren; numerous...

Biography of John P. Clum

John P. Clum, of San Bernardino, was born in Claverack, Columbia County, New York, in 1851, and his childhood and youth were passed on the banks of the historic Hudson. At the age of nineteen he graduated at the Hudson River Institute, and entered the freshman class of Rutger’s College, New Brunswick, New Jersey. After completing the first year and creditably passing all the examinations, adverse fortune compelled him to leave college, and in 1871 he entered the meteorological service of the United States Government. Having taken a course in meteorology and signaling, he was ordered to Santa Fe, New Mexico, and there opened a station for meteorological observations in November 1871. He was honored with the appointment as delegate to the Presbyterian General Assembly, held at Baltimore in 1873, and at St. Louis in 1874. On February 26, 1874, he was appointed Indian Agent of the Apaches at San Carlos, Arizona, and discharged the difficult duties of the office with remarkable fidelity and efficiency, and to the great satisfaction of the citizens of Arizona and Colorado. February 26, 1876, Mr. Clum resigned the agency, but finally, at the urgent request of the department, withdrew his resignation in October following. He resigned again in March, 1877, and left the agency July 1, 1877. In November 1876, Mr. Clum was united in marriage, at Delaware, Ohio, with Miss Mary D. Ware, daughter of the late Hon. Thomas D. Ware, of Cincinnati, a refined and cultured lady, whose untimely death occurred in Tombstone, Arizona, after four years of a joyous wedded life. During his service as Indian Agent, Mr. Clum passed...

Biography of Peter Rainsford Brady

Among the early pioneers of Arizona, none bore a more prominent part in its development than Peter Rainsford Brady. He came, on his paternal side, from good old Irish stock. His mother, Anna Rainsford, was from Virginia. He was born in Georgetown, District of Columbia, August 4th, 1825; received his education, in part, at the Georgetown College, later entering the Naval Academy at Annapolis, Maryland, from which he was graduated about the year 1&44. After cruising around the Mediterranean Sea in the United States vessel “Plymouth,” he resigned from the navy, and left his home October 26th, 1846, for San Antonio, Texas, where he enlisted as a Lieutenant in the Texas Hangers, and served with distinction in the Mexican “War. After the war Mr. Brady joined a surveying party under Colonel Andrew B. Gray, who made a survey from Marshall, Texas, to El Paso; thence across the country to Tubac and from the latter point made branch surveys, one to Port Lobos on the Gulf of California, and the other to Fort Yuma and San Diego. Mr. Brady served as a captain on this expedition, and was prominent in many Indian fights. When the work was completed, the company disbanded at San Francisco. Mr. Brady was of an adventurous spirit, and in his younger life preferred the wilderness to the smooth paths of civilization. In 1854 he came to Arizona and settled in Tucson, in which place he resided for many years, bearing his part as a good citizen in those exciting times. After the organization of the Territory, he held several public offices, and was sheriff for two...

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