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Biographical Sketch of Nathaniel Maughs

Nathaniel Maughs was of Loudon County, Va. His children were David, William, John, Moses, Elijah, Stephen, Vinson, Mary, Sally, and Eli. Mr. Maughs removed from Virginia to Fleming County, Ky., and his children all came with him. David and William were Baptist preachers, and the former settled in Lincoln County, Mo. Elijah married .Mary Smith, by whom he had-Mordecai M., Milton M., Sophronia F., Lucinda S., Elijah C., Daniel M., and Mary S. V. Mr. Maughs died, and his widow married his brother Stephen, who settled in Montgomery County, Mo., in 1822. They had Jerry S. D. S., and George M. B. Mordecai Maughs, who was a physician, was married first to the widow Jane Scott; second to Dorothea Stephenson, and third to Lizzie Offutt. He had sixteen children in all. The Doctor was an educated, intelligent man, full of wit and humor, and very fond of practical jokes. He lived at Danville for many years, but finally removed to Callaway County, where he died. Sophronia Maughs married Dr. William Proctor, of St. Louis. Mary V. S. was married first to Henry Davault, and second to Willis Loyd, both old settlers of Montgomery County. Jerry died a bachelor in Montgomery County. George M. B., son of Stephen Maughs, is a physician. He married Anna Anderson, of Callaway County, and settled in St. Louis, where he has become distinguished in his...

Biography of Thomas J. Crain

Thomas J. Crain was born near the Ohio river, in Fleming county, Kentucky, September 4, 1830. He was reared and educated in his native place, and continued to reside there until 1855, when he migrated to Missouri and entered land in Holt county, improving the same and living upon it until 1864, in February of which year he rented his farm and went to Nebraska City, Nebraska. Here he was engaged in freighting to Denver, Colorado, for one year, when he opened a feeding stable, and carried on that business until the spring of 1866, then went to Hamburg, Iowa, and engaged in stock-feeding for one year. Returning to Gallatin in the spring of 1867, he engaged in the mercantile business with William Mann, under the name and style of Mann &. Crain, and transacted business until the fall of 1869, when they dissolved partnership and closed out business. He next engaged in the lumber trade, being the pioneer lumber dealer of Gallatin, and there being no railroad at that time, he had the lumber hauled by team from Hamilton, in Caldwell county. In 1871 he retired from the lumber trade and engaged in the grocery business with S. T. Hill, under the firm name of Hill & Crain, until 1875. We find him buying and shipping walnut lumber to Chicago in 1878, and he continued to buy and ship until 1880, when he entered into partnership with A. F. Barnett, forming the present firm of Crain & Barnett, lumber dealers. Mr. Crain was married to Miss Amanda M. Plumer, of Fleming county, Kentucky, on the 25th of January,...

Biography of Joseph Little Bristow, Hon.

No Kansan in recent years has rendered such distinguished public service to the nation at large as former Senator Bristow, now chairman of the State Public Utilities Commission. Mr. Bristow had been a resident of Kansas since he was twelve years old. From his father, who was a Methodist minister of the old type, he inherited a courage of eonvictions, a determined animosity to all public and private dishonesty, and his own life on the Kansas prairies had developed in him a zeal for popular rights and liberties and a fearless statesmanship equally removed from radicalism and reaction. For six years he worked unceasingly in the United States Senate as a champion of progressive doctrines, some of which were typically Kansan in flavor and spirit, but all marked by a steadfast devotion to the national weal. Few men have done more to eradicate systematic graft from public service. He can be described as a progressive republican, but extreme partisanship is not a part of his character. In the Senate he showed himself a reasonable and reasoning advocate of protection. It can be said that he had favored or opposed no measure which he himself did not thoroughly understand. Hence he committed himself to deflnite propositions and specific measures, rather than a general policy. This perhaps explains the fact that he opposed the Payne-Aldrich tariff act of the republican administration, and also opposed the more recent tariff program of the democratic majority. While he approached and considered public economic questions from the standpoint of a Kansan, he always justified his support of opposition by something more than provincial and local...

Biography of Robert Wilson Morrison

ROBERT WILSON MORRISON. – This leading pioneer of the immigration of 1844 was born March 14, 1811, in Fleming County, Kentucky, of Scotch parentage. In 1822 he moved with his parents to Montgomery County, Missouri, living with them until his marriage in 1831, to Miss Nancy Irwin. Two years later a move was made to Clay County, and thence to Clinton County, on the border of the territory occupied by the Indians of the plains. Upon the consummation of the “Platte purchase,” he moved with his family into that frontier region, and for six years lived in Andrew County. The excitement and interest in respect to Oregon was then, in 1843-44, reaching a high pitch among the people of the frontier; and in that particular neighborhood the Oregon fever was still further inflamed by letters from a man named Smith, formerly of that section, but then in Oregon, who was urging his people to come to the land by the Pacific Ocean. Indeed, all information obtainable was found to be favorable to Oregon; and, in time for the trip next season, Mr. Morrison was among the number who were armed, equipped and well prepared for the march across the plains. His wife and six children were of course to accompany him; and there were two young men taken into the family as fellow-travelers, – John Minto and Willard H. Rees, – who have since become eminent in our state. Many of the incidents of that eventful season on the plains have been narrated elsewhere; and it will not therefore be necessary to give the details here. Upon the organization...

Biography of Charles V. Fitch

Charles V. Fitch. Valeda is one of the flourishing small villages in Labette County and to a large degree the business activities of the place are concentrated in the enterprise of one citizen, Charles V. Fitch, who owns and manages the leading store of that community and is also the present postmaster. Mr. Fitch was born in Fleming County, Kentucky, May 2, 1875. His Fitch ancestors came from England to Virginia in colonial days. His grandfather, Nathan Fitch, was born in Kentucky, spent his life there as a farmer, and died in Fleming County. S. E. Fitch, father of the Valeda merchant, was also prominently known in that part of Kansas. He was born in Fleming County, Kentucky, in 1848, was reared and married there, and his early years were spent as a farmer. In 1886 he moved to Valeda, where he continued farming, but for the last twelve years of his life was engaged in general merchandising at Valeda. He died there in 1913. When he first began to cast his vote it was as a republican, but later he identified himself with the populist movement and still later became a democrat. For two terms he served as township trustee of Howard township. He was an active member of the United Brethren Church. S. E. Fitch married Fannie Wallingford, who was born in Fleming County, Kentucky, in 1850, and is still living at Valeda. Her children were: Charles V.; Walter, who died at the age of twenty years, having been drowned near Lenapah, Oklahoma, while engaged in a cattle drive through that territory; Lula, wife of F. P....

Emmons, Martha Emeline Mrs. (Day) – Obituary

Enterprise, Wallowa County, Oregon Mrs. Martha Emeline (Day) Emmons, died Nov. 7, 1909 Mrs. J. W. Emmons passed away Sunday morning at 3:30 o’clock after a very brief illness of pneumonia. Funeral was held Monday at 10 a.m. from the Christian Church. Rev. W. S. Crockett conducting the services. Internment was in Enterprise Cemetery. A very large concourse of friends assembled in the church and followed the corpse to its last resting place. Mary Emeline Day was born at Flemingsburg, KY, April 13, 1847 and was married to J. W. Emmons Dec. 21, 1865. They moved to Illinois in 1871 and ten years later to Nebraska. In 1884, they came to Union County, Oregon and in 1893 to this county where they have since resided. Five sons and two daughters were born to them, all of whom survive, Alton R., Leonard B., Charles D., and George M. Emmons of this city and vicinity, William P. Emmons of LaGrande, Mrs.. Jessie Homan of Enterprise and Mrs.. Lilly J. Davis of Nebraska. All were at the funeral but Mrs.. Davis and the husband, who is in Oklahoma. Two nephews, F. A. and L.P. Day of LaGrande were here also. Mother Emmons as she was familiarly called, united with the Christian Church 30 years ago and always stood courageously for the right. Never strong physically, she was always doing for others, blessing by her presence. It was her request that the song “Jesus will Carry Me Over the River” be sung at her funeral. All who listened, felt as if those words were fulfilled and that she was at rest. The above...

Biographical Sketch of John A. Moss

John A. Moss, farmer; P. O. Etna; is the son of James H. and Catharine Moss, was born in Fleming Co., Ky., July 25, 1837; moved to Coles Co. March 12, 1878; is the owner of forty acres of land, valued at $1,000. Was married to his first wife, Mary Johnston, April 5, 1866, died Feb. 16, 1872; names of children deceased (boy) Willard S., died March 11, 1872; girls deceased, Dulta B., died Aug. 11, 1870 was married to his second wife, Phebe Eaton, of Rush Co., Ind., Dec. 21, 1873; names of children (living), girl, Bushna, born April 20, 1875; deceased girl infant, died Jan. 17, 1874. His father, James H. Moss, was born May 15, 1809, died Jan. 8, 1876, in the 67th year of his age; his mother, Catharine Moss, was born April 15, 1810, died Sept. 12, 1866, in the 56th year of her...

Fleming County, Kentucky Census Records

1790 Fleming County, Kentucky Census Records Free 1790 Census Form for your Research Hosted at Ancestry.com – 14 Days Free Hosted at Census Guide 1800 U.S. Census Guide 1800 Fleming County, Kentucky Census Records Free 1800 Census Form for your Research Hosted at Ancestry.com – 14 Days Free Hosted at Census Guide 1800 U.S. Census Guide 1810 Fleming County, Kentucky Census Records Free 1810 Census Form for your Research Hosted at Ancestry.com – 14 Days Free Hosted at Fleming County USGenWeb Archives Project Morgan Surname Hosted at Census Guide 1810 U.S. Census Guide 1820 Fleming County, Kentucky Census Records Free 1820 Census Form for your Research Hosted at Ancestry.com – 14 Days Free 1820 Fleming County, Kentucky Census Images $ Hosted at Census Guide 1820 U.S. Census Guide 1830 Fleming County, Kentucky Census Records Free 1830 Census Form for your Research Hosted at Ancestry.com – 14 Days Free 1830 Fleming County, Kentucky Census Images $ Hosted at Fleming County USGenWeb Archives Project Morgan Surname Hosted at Census Guide 1830 U.S. Census Guide 1840 Fleming County, Kentucky Census Records Free 1840 Census Form for your Research Hosted at Ancestry.com – 14 Days Free 1840 Fleming County, Kentucky Census Images $ Hosted at Census Guide 1840 U.S. Census Guide 1850 Fleming County, Kentucky Census Records Hosted at Free 1850 Census Form for your Research Hosted at Ancestry.com – 14 Days Free 1850 Fleming County, Kentucky Census Images $ 1850 Fleming County, Kentucky Slave Schedule $ Hosted at Fleming County USGenWeb Archives Project Census Index Jackson Families Morgan Surname Hosted at RootsWeb Division: Flemingsburg Dis. No.1 Division: District No.1 Division: District No.1...

Fleming County, Kentucky Cemetery Records

Fleming County Fleming County, Kentucky Cemetery Records Hosted at Fleming County USGenWeb Archives Project Asbury Farm Cemetery Eden’s Chapel Cemetery Eden’s Chapel Cemetery Elizaville Cemetery Fairview Cemetery Haden Adams Cemetery Bald Hill Cemetery Jackson Burials in Fleming County Johnson Cemetery Locust Grove Cemetery , Part 1 and 2 Million Cemetery Cemetery near Pleasureville Fleming County, Kentucky Cemetery Records Hosted at Fleming County, Kentucky KYGenWeb Fleming County Cemetery Fleming County, Kentucky Cemetery Records Hosted at Hosted at Interment.net Eden’s Chapel Graveyard Fleming County, Kentucky Cemetery Records Hosted at The Hargett’s Genealogy & Family Hargett-Royce Cemetery Fleming County, Kentucky Cemetery Records Hosted at My Eastern Kentucky Lowe Family Asbury Farm Cemetery Cemetery between Pleasureville and Foxport, Fleming County...

Biographical Sketch of Nelson Jones

NELSON JONES. – Mr. Jones, one of the largest stock-raisers of Eastern Oregon, having besides his interest at Heppner, Oregon, large holdings on the main Malheur, was born in 1840 in Fleming county, Kentucky. Remaining there until 1849, he moved with his parents to Iowa, where he lived until 1858. In that year he left the paternal roof, and made the journey to Pike’s Peak, but continued on to Shasta county, California. In that county he engaged in mining, but in 1860 sought a more tranquil life, coming to Polk county, Oregon, and engaging in farming until 1866. In the meantime he made several trips to the various mining camps, freighting and occasionally indulging in mining speculations of his own. In 1866 he made a permanent settlement at the forks of Butter creek, and began operations in sheep-raising, and has been engaged in the stock business from that time until the present, raising also cattle and horses. Of sheep he has now fifteen thousand head, and about five hundred horses. In a public capacity Mr. Jones has fulfilled his part, having been elected councilman of Heppner in the spring of 1889. He now fills that position with credit to himself and satisfaction to his constituents. Although holding no landed estate, he has no less the interest of his country at heart, and is always relied upon as one of the most faithful and substantial men of that...
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