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Chase Family of Fall River MA

CHASE (Fall River family). The Chase family here considered is strictly speaking a Massachusetts-Rhode Island one, springing as it does from the early Roxbury Yarmouth family, a later generation of which located in Portsmouth, R. I. In the third generation from the immigrant ancestor through Joseph Chase, who located in Swansea, Mass., and Benjamin, who settled in Portsmouth, R. I., have descended the Chases who have come from those respective localities. And both branches have shared largely in the commercial and industrial life of this section of Massachusetts and Rhode Island. From the Portsmouth branch came the late Borden Chase, who for years was a coal dealer in Fall River, and his son, the present Simeon Borden Chase, has long been one of the fore-most cotton manufacturers of that same city and as well a most active and influential citizen. There follows in chronological order from the immigrant settler, William Chase, the genealogy and family history of the Portsmouth-Fall River family just alluded to. William Chase, born about 1595, in England, with wife Mary and son William came to America in the ship with Governor Winthrop and his colony in 1630, settling first in Roxbury. He soon became a member of the church of which the Rev. John Eliot, the Apostle to the Indians, was pastor. On Oct. 19, 1630, he applied for freemanship and was admitted a freeman May 14, 1634. In 1637, or thereabout, he became one of the company who made a new settlement at Yarmouth, of which town lie was made constable in 1639. He resided at Yarmouth the rest of his life, dying in...

Descendants of Rev. George Shove of Fall River, MA

SHOVE. Rev. George Shove, gentleman, son of Margery, who was admitted to the church at Boston as a widow in 1638, and who subsequently was of Rowley and a proprietor and still later of Roxbury, where she married in 1654 Richard Peacock, became the third minister of Taunton, ordained Nov. 17, 1665. Of his ministerial life little is known except that be “preached acceptably,” and taught the Taunton school; and it is said that “no rumor of strife or discord in connection with him comes down to us.” His fame, however, as a land bolder and dealer in real estate bas not failed to reach us. He is represented as having been largely concerned in the secular transactions of the town and possessed of considerable wealth. He was one of the six original proprietors of Assonet Neck, when that purchase was made in 1680. His home lot was that of William Phillips, one of the first settlers on the east side of what is now High street, between Cohannet and Winthrop streets. On July 14, 1664, Mr. Shove married Hopestill, daughter of Rev. Samuel Newman, a learned man, the distinguished minister of Rehoboth. She died March 7, 1673, and he married Feb. 17, 1674-75, Mrs. Hannah Walley. She died in September, 1685, and he married Dec. 3, 1686, Mrs. Sarah Farwell. He died April 21, 1687. His mother Margery was buried at Taunton in 1680, with note that she was “mother of Mr. George Shove.” The children of Minister Shove were: Edward, born April 28, 1665 (buried Aug. 7, 1665); Elizabeth, born Aug. 10, 1666; Seth, born Sept. 10,...

Archer Family of Fall River, MA

ARCHER (Fall River family). Through much of the nineteenth century the name opening this article was a most highly esteemed and respected one at Fall River, made so by the lives of the late Jason H. Archer, M. D., of the medical profession, and his son, the late John Jason Archer, Esq., for years one of the learned members of the Fall River bar. The home at least for a time of this Fall River Archer family was in the nearby town of Wrentham, in Norfolk county, where lived Amos Archer, father of Dr. Jason H. Archer and grandfather of the late John Jason Archer, Esq. While the Wrentham vital records do not show the Archers among the town’s early inhabitants the Archers as a family were here in Massachusetts in its early Colonial period. One Samuel Archer (name spelled in the early Essex county records Arehard) was living in Salem as early as 1630, as on Oct, 19th of that year he took the freeman’s oath there. He was born between 1602 and 1615, and was a carpenter. He was a member of the First Church before 1636; was constable of the town in 1657; and marshal from 1654 until his decease. He died in December, 1667. His wife Susanna survived him, and married (second) Richard Hutchinson in October, 1668. His children, born in Salem, Mass., were: Hannah, born in Salem; Samuel, born in 1634-35, married Hannah Osgood, of Andover, and lived in 1632, married Matthew Dove, a planter of Salem, a house carpenter; John, born in 1638, married Bethiah Weeks, and lived in Salem, a cooper; Bethiah...

Descendants of Joseph Borden of Fall River MA

BORDEN (Fall River family – line of Joseph, fourth generation). The Borden family is an ancient one both here in New England and over the water in old England, as well as one of historic interest and distinction. The New England branch has directly or indirectly traced the lineage of the American ancestor, Richard Borden, many generations back in English history. His first English forbear went over to England from Bourdonnay, Normandy, as a soldier under William the Conquerer, and after the battle of Hastings  – in A. D. 1066 – was assigned lands in the County of Kent, where the family afterward became useful, wealthy and influential, the village where they resided being named Borden. One John Borden, of a later generation, moved to Wales early in the seventeenth century, where his sons Richard and John were married. These sons returned to Borden, in England, and in May, 1635, embarked for America. (I) Richard Borden is found a settler in Portsmouth, R. I., in 1638, in which year he was admitted an inhabitant of the island of Aquidneck, and in that same year was allotted five acres of land. He figured in the surveying and platting of the lands thereabout in 1639, and in the year following was one of those appointed to lay out the lands in Porstmouth, R. I. He was assistant in 1653 and 1654; general treasurer in 1654-55; commissioner in 1654-55-56-57; and deputy in 1667 and 1670. He bought land in Providence in 1661, and not far from 1667 became one of the original purchasers of land in New Jersey from the Indians. He...

Osborn Family of Fall River Massachusetts

During the latter half of the century but recently closed and on into the present one, during the period of the great growth and development as an industrial center of Fall River, the name Osborn has stood out conspicuously in the business life of the city. Reference is made notably to the Osborn brothers — the late Hon. Weaver and James Munroe Osborn — for many years among the most prominent mill promoters and bankers of Fall River; and they have been followed by a generation now representative of the name and family, Mr. James E. Osborn, the son of James M., being now active and prominent in the same line of operation the father followed, is treasurer of the American Linen Company and Merchants’ Manufacturing Company and president of the Covel & Osborn Company, dealers in hardware and mill supplies. This Osborn family here treated is one of at least a century and three quarters’ standing in Rhode Island and the nearby part of Massachusetts. Still earlier than the beginning of the period just named there is a record of the family of Jeremiah and Mercy Osband at Bristol, now R. I., as early as 1684, the date of birth of their first child. Their children were: Robert Osband, born Aug. 11, 1684; Katherine Osband, born Nov. 12, 1686; John Osband, born Oct. 12, 1689; Jeremiah Osband, born July 25, 1693; Margaret Osband, born May 27, 1695; Sarah Osband, born May 11, 1701; Jeremiah Osband (2), born June 11, 1706. One Nathaniel Osband petitioned the General Court at its May session, held at Newport, 1682. So far as has...

Descendants of Richard Borden of Fall River MA

The Borden family is an ancient one both here in New England and over the water in old England, as well as one of historic interest and distinction. The New England branch has directly or indirectly traced the lineage of the American ancestor, Richard Borden, many generations back in English history. His first English forbear went over to England from Bourdonnay, Normandy, as a soldier under William the Conqueror, and after the battle of Hastings — A.D. 1066 — was assigned lands in the County of Kent, where the family afterward became useful, wealthy and influential, the village where they resided being named Borden. One John Borden, of a later generation, early in the seventeenth century, moved to Wales, where his sons Richard and John were married. These sons returned to Borden, in England, and in May, 1635, embarked for America. (I) Richard Borden is found a settler in Portsmouth, R. I., in 1638, in which year he was admitted an inhabitant of the island of Aquidneck, and in that same year was allotted five acres of land. He figured in the surveying and platting of the lands thereabout in 1639, and in the year following was one of those appointed to lay out the lands in Portsmouth, R. I. He was assistant in 1653-54; general treasurer in 1654-55; commissioner in 1654-55-56-57; and was deputy in 1667 and 1670. He bought land in Providence in 1661, and not far from 1667 became one of the original purchasers of land in New Jersey from the Indians. He died May 25, 1671. Joan, his wife, died July 15, 1688. Their children...

Skeleton In Armor

The following description of certain human skeletons, supposed to be in armor, found at Fall River, or Troy, in Massachusetts, is from the pen of George Gibbs, Esq. It is drawn with that writer’s usual caution and archaeological acumen.

Biography of James Humphrey

James Humphrey, as lawyer, editor, judge and state official, firmly established his position throughout a period of half a century as one of the ablest and most popular citizens of Central Kansas. He was born in Nottinghamshire, England, March 8, 1833; came to New England in 1854, and during the succeeding three years was a resident of Fall River, Massachusetts. There he became interested in the Kansas agitation for free statehood and in April, 1857, reached Manhattan. His first employment in connection with the shrievalty was a good test of his pluck, and he so arose to the occasion that he was afterward elected mayor. In 1859 and 1860 he served as assistant county treasurer and in 1861 was head of the office. He also served as justice of the peace, and his trial of the cases brought before him brought so much commendations from the lawyears of both sides that he decided to study law. He was admitted to the bar in 1863. He has previously broken into journalism by editing the Manhattan Express in the absence of C. F. DeVivaldi, who was serving abroad as consul to Brazil. After the Civil war Mr. Humphrey established a large practice, and handled it with such ability that in the spring of 1867 he was appointed judge of the Eighth Judicial District. In the fall of that year he was elected to that bench by a large majority. He continued his residence in Manhattan until 1870, when he resigned from the bench to enter the practice at Junction City. He continued to be associated with Capt. James R. McClure for...

Biographical Sketch of Aldrich, James Mott

Aldrich, James Mott, son of Arnold and Dollee Lang Aldrich, was born in Smithfield, Providence County, R. I., October 30, 1817. He attended the common schools and the academy at Union Village. He studied medicine in the office of Dr. J. A. Brown, Providence, R. I., Harvard medical school, and in the Botanic Medical College, Cincinnati, Ohio; and commenced regular practice in Fall River in 1843, in which city he has ever since lived. Dr. Aldrich was married in Dedham, May 24, 1844, to Mary A. Allen, who died in 1857. He was again married, September 23, 1862, to Louisa G., the daughter of Hon. Nathaniel B. and Sarah (Gray) Borden, of Fall River. They have two children; Mary L. and Nathaniel B. Aldrich. From 1846 to ’47 he was editor of the “Medical Enquirer.” He has been for many years president of the Children’s Home; was a member of the school board fifteen years; and is president of the Barnard Manufacturing Company. Dr. Aldrich was a strong abolitionist, and has been a life-long advocate of total abstinence from all intoxicants; was a member of the Society of Friends, but left them when their New England yearly meeting forbade the opening of their meeting-houses for anti-slavery gatherings. He has been connected with the Unitarian society since...

Biography of Judge E. F. Howcroft

JUDGE E. F. HOWCROFT. Not without justice, Judge E. F. Howcroft is conceded to hold an enviable position among the prominent and successful men of Christian County, for he has not only rendered it valuable service as a reliable public official, but as an industrious farmer and law-abiding citizen. He is a native of the Old Bay State, born at Fall River, November 18, 1838, to the marriage of David and Ruth (Bindley) Howcroft, and like other British-American citizens, has done good stalwart work in the cultivation and development of this section. His father, David Howcroft, who for many years was a seaman on a whaling vessel, was born in England and came to this country with his father, John Howcroft, who settled in Massachusetts. After growing to mature years, the father of our subject moved to Dover, N. H., and there lived for many years. He was a Republican in politics. Mrs. Howcroft died in 1838, when our subject was only six months old. The latter was the younger of two children. Sarah, the other child, is now residing in Massachusetts, the wife of Andrew Waldren. Until about sixteen years of age, our subject remained in his native State. He then went to Penobscot County, Me., where he remained until twenty-four years of age, and then returned to Massachusetts, where he remained until 1876. He married, in Maine, Miss Ann Hacking, a native of England, daughter of Robert and Mary (Taylor) Hacking. In 1876 Mr. Howcroft and family turned their faces toward the setting sun and first located in Dunn County, Wisconsin, where they remained for one year....
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