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Burnside, Emily L. Cerkonck Mrs. – Obituary

Baker City, Oregon Emily L. Burnside, 89, a long-time Baker City resident,died Oct. 21, 2004, at St. Elizabeth Health Care Center. Visitations will be from 4 p.m. to 6 p.m. Sunday at Coles Funeral Home, 1950 Place St. Her graveside service will be at 11 a.m. Monday at Mount Hope Cemetery. Mrs. Burnside was born Oct. 30, 1914, at Saskatchewan Providence, Canada, to Albin and Anna Cerkonck. The family moved from Canada to Fall City, Wash., when she was a young girl. She received her schooling there. She married Elmer Lloyd Burnside in 1935 at Yakima, Wash. They lived in several locations until settling at Richland working on a farm. In 1942, they moved to Halfway where they owned and operated a restaurant, bar and hotel, now known as Stockman’s. They divorced in 1946 and Mrs. Burnside moved with her children to Baker City where she had lived since. In Baker City, she took care of her children as well as many others as a certified foster parent for Children Services. She also ran a day care center for many years. She loved her family and taking care of children. She enjoyed cooking and always had a large garden. She will be very missed by her children and grandchildren who loved her very much. Survivors include her children, Deannie Burnside Wirth, and her husband, Wayne, of Spokane, Wash., Patricia Burnside Brooks of Pine City, Wash., Wayne Burnside and his wife, Linda, and Daryl Burnside and his wife, Tammy, both of Baker City; sisters, Helyn Edwards of California and Mary Frost of Grants Pass; grandchildren, Randy, Rhonda, Andrea, Theresa, Susan,...

Biographical Sketch of Jeremiah W. Borst

JEREMIAH W. BORST. – The subject of this sketch was born in Tyoga county, New York, in 1829. At the age of four years, he removed with his father’s family to Indiana, and was reared on a farm. The days of his youth were spent in Missouri, with a return to the Hoosier State. In 1850, he crossed the plains with ox-teams for the gold fields of California, and dug for the precious metal five years. In 1858, he came north to Washington Territory, finding a home on Snoqualmie Prairie, since famous as the location of the great ranch of the Hop-growers’ Association. He laid his claim upon the one hundred and sixty acres now owned by this company. Upon the survey of the land, – for his first claim was prior to the survey, – he availed himself of the homestead law to acquire another quarter section, and by purchase from the Territorial University secured three hundred and ninety more on this very fertile plain. He lived upon his land, cultivating and improving it, until in 1887 he felt a desire to expand his place into a town. The requirements of the country justified his plan; and he laid off Falls City on a site comprising half a section which he had bought about ten years before. This place gives promise of thrift. Besides this town property, Mr. Borst owns some twelve hundred acres adjoining, and operates a sawmill. He has served the county as commissioner for one term, and is a man of sagacity and undoubted probity. Mr. Borst was one of the discoverers of the Denny...

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