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Walter Bradford Todd of Fort Myers FL

Walter Bradford Todd8, (William S.7, David6, Titus5, Titus4, Benjamin3, Michael2, Christopher1) born Jan. 4, 1880, in Ridgefield, Conn., married in 1903, Lucy M., daughter of Robert Jay Walsh. He attended the primary grades of the public schools in Ridgefield, Conn. In 1893, he became a student at Kings School in Stamford, Conn. In Nov., 1896, he secured a position in the Greenwich Trust Company, of Greenwich, Conn., and in 1906 he became its treasurer, which position he held for several years. In 1919, he was living at Fort Myers, Fla. Children: 2335. Ruth Bradford, b. April 5, 1908. 2336. Anna Walsh, b. Oct. 12, 1909. 2337. Edith Isabelle, b. June 10,...

Ira Gardner Todd of Hampshire County MA

Ira Gardner Todd8, (Iru S.7, Justus6, Asa5, Gershom4, Gershom3, Michael2, Christopher1) born Oct. 2, 1837, in Northampton, Mass., died Aug. 22, 1894, in Bridgeport, Conn. He, his wife and daughter are buried in Spring Grove Cemetery, Florence, Mass., he married Dec. 4, 1866, Esther Luella, daughter of Jeremiah and Laura P. (Ellis) Boyden, who was born July 22, 1849, died Sept. 15, 1913, in Oak Bluffs, Mass. He was a machinist by trade and worked at it for several years in Florence, Mass. In 1881, he went to Bridgeport, Conn., where he secured a position and was followed the next year by his family. He worked there at his trade for some years, until a few years before his death when he entered the employ of a lady who lived in New York City, who was interested in perfecting a sewing machine equiped with a rotary shuttle. He devoted the last years of his life to this work, it seeming to be a congenial task, as he had had some experience in the principles of sewing machine construction, as he worked for the company in Florence, Mass., that manufactured what was called the “Florence” sewing machine. He was a veteran of the civil war, having enlisted in Company G., 37th regiment M. V. M. and served through the war, part of the time as a musician. Children: 2344. Frank Merrill, b. Jan. 22, 1874, m. May 18, 1898, Emily, daughter of Joseph Henry and Jane Hannah (Smith) Bladon, who was b. Sept. 12, 1878, in Scotland. He went to Bridgeport, Conn., with his parents in 1881 and there obtained...

Arthur Stanley Todd of Greenwich CT

Arthur Stanley Todd8, (William S.7, David6, Titus5, Titus4, Benjamin3, Michael2, Christopher1) born July 15, 1881, in Ridgefield, Conn., married in Sept., 1910, Nellie H., daughter of James H. Hopkins, of Oxford, N. Y. He entered the public schools at Ridgefield, Conn., in 1889; in 1895, he entered the High School at Norwalk, Conn. In 1897, he secured a position as clerk of the New York, New Haven & Hartford Railroad Company at New Haven, Conn. One year later he entered the employ of Bronson & Townsend Company, who were hardware dealers in New Haven, Conn. Thence he went to Greenwich, Conn., where he secured a position with the Weir Building Company, remaining with them about two years, when he left their employ and bought an interest in the Mead Stationery Company, and somewhat later he became sole owner. Children: 2338. Arthur Stanley, b. June 23, 1911. 2339. James Hopkins, b. May 24,...

Charles Todd of Ridgefield CT

Charles Todd8, (Abraham7, Abraham6, Abraham5, Abraham4, Jonah3, Samuel2, Christopher1) born Oct. 28, 1826, in Goldens Bridge, N. Y., died April 8, 1870, in Ridgefield, Conn. He was twice married both wives being sisters, first, in Nov., 1850, Mary Ann, daughter of Lyman and Delilah (Wescott) Knapp, who was born Nov. 18, 1832, died May 24, 1861, second, in June, 1861, Eliza Jane Knapp, a sister to his first wife and who was born Dec. 29, 1834, died April 10, 1910, at the old home in Ridgefield. During the first Mrs. Todd’s last sickness, she had her younger sister come to take care of her and it was her dying request that Mr. Todd should immediately marry this sister after her decease, that she (her sister) might bring up the children. Accordingly, the marriage took place the next month after her decease. Children by Mary Ann Knapp: *2157. Estella, b. Jan. 24, 1853. 2158. Charles Knapp, b. Sept. 22, 1855, he is unmarried; lives with his younger brother in the homestead at Ridgefield, Conn. *2159. Flora, b. Aug. 23, 1857. 2160. Rufus, b. Sept. 25, 1859, he too, is unmarried and lives at the old place in Ridgefield, Conn. Child by Eliza Jane Knapp: 2161. Mary Ann, b. March 23, 1862, is unmarried; she keeps house for her two half brothers at the old place in Ridgefield,...

Biographical Sketch of E. G. Judson

E. G. Judson. About 1881-’82 Judson & Brown secured 1,500 acres of land on the sloping hillsides south of the Mill Creek zanja, surveyed and platted the same into five, ten and twenty-acre lots, with wide avenues traversing the whole plat. This enterprise was regarded as an experiment from the fact that the red soil of the slope had never been tested as to its adaptability to horticultural pursuits. With plenty of water and good cultivation the doubt as to the value of the land was soon removed and the success of the colony enterprise was assured. Thus encouraged the projectors enlarged their possessions by additional purchases, until they had between three and four thousand acres in their colony, which, on account of the color of the soil, they named Redlands. This was the fourth city incorporated within San Bernardino County. November 26, 1888, the citizens, in accordance with the general laws of the State, voted as follows on incorporation: whole number of votes cast, 283; for incorporation, 216. Officers elected were: Trustees, E. G. Judson, J. B. Glover, B. W. Cave, C. N. Andrews. H. H. Sinclair; Clerk, L. W. Clark; Marshal, W. C. Brumagim; Treasurer, F. P. Morrison. Mr. Judson was born in Bridgeport, Connecticut, and was educated there and at Amherst. He first went into the book business in New York City, where he was afterward for a number of years, a dealer in stocks, broker-age, etc., on Wall street. In 1876 he came to California, and Redlands is the result of his coming. He is a man of marked ability, and but for his indefatigable...

Meier, Joseph Henry – Obituary

Joseph Henry Meier, 74, a former Baker City resident who purchased Leo Adler’s magazine and book wholesale distributorship in 1977, died Feb. 6, 2004, at Portland after suffering a massive stroke related to Alzheimer’s disease. His funeral was today at Tualatin. Mr. Meier was born on Aug. 15, 1929, in the home of his grandparents’ in the then-rural Gardenville section of northeast Baltimore. He was the oldest of four children of the late Catherine Ann Worline Meier and Joseph William Meier. He grew up helping his grandfather work his farm, including work with a team of horses. Part of that farm was later sold to the city and became Radecke Park. “After those early years of experience from working the farm, Joe decided to pursue a new career in sales,” said his brother, Robert H. Meier of Monkton, Md. “His first job in a lifelong sales career was distributing “Liberty Magazine” within the local Gardenville area when he was just 12 years old. He then moved on to delivering the Baltimore News Post.” Mr. Meier graduated from Polytechnic Institute in the early 1950s and went on to join the Maryland Air National Guard. He served eight years at the guard’s home base at Harbor Field, the present Dundalk Marine Terminal, prior to the Maryland Air National Guard’s move to its present location at Martin State Airport. He earned a degree in history from Loyola College at Baltimore. “Joe met the love of his life, Ellen Patricia “Pat” Fogarty, at a local dance when he was 19, and they married in 1955,” his brother said. She became his confidante and...

Biographical Sketch of John Rowlee Fausey

JOHN ROWLEE FAUSEY – To the general advancement of the interests of the public schools of Massachusetts, and particularly of Springfield and West Springfield, Mr. Fausey has devoted the larger part of his career as a teacher and superintendent, and with results that are recorded as having enlarged the bounds and increased the value of the educational institutions in those communities where he has taught and held official position. John Rowlee Fausey, son of James Seldon and Caroline Helen (Blauvelt) Fausey, was born March 19, 1870, in Elmira, New York, where he attended the public school, and he afterwards graduated at Genessee Wesleyan Seminary at Lima, New York, in the class of 1893, In 1893-1895 and 1896-1897, he was a student at Syracuse University, where he later received his degree of Bachelor of Arts. Mr. Fausey at once entered upon his career as an educator, and during 1898-1899 he was both teacher and principal at Galeton, Pennsylvania; at Norwalk, Connecticut, in 1899-1902; and at Norwich, Connecticut, in 1902-1905. Mr. Fausey went to Springfield as principal of the Howard Street School of that city in 1906, and he continued in that position until 1912, when he went to West Springfield as superintendent, so continuing to 1918. From 1918 to 1923, he served as superintendent at Winchester, Massachusetts. In 1923 he was recalled to the West Springfield superintendency, which he has held to the present. John Rowlee Fausey married, December 26, 1899. in Syracuse, New York, Lena May...

Biographical Sketch of John Carpenter

(XI) John (5), son of William (4) Carpenter, was born in England about 1628, died May 23, 1695. He came from England with his father, and when about seventeen went to Connecticut. For several years he lived in different towns in the latter state, and worked at his trade as carpenter. He was in Stratford, Connecticut, in 1646, and in 1660 bought land in Hempstead, Long Island. He was chosen townsman of Hempstead in 1663, and was made freeman of the state of Connecticut, May, 1664. He bought land in Jamaica, Long Island, in 1665. In 1673 he was made captain of a company of fusileers in Jamaica, and that same year was ordered with his company to defend Fort James, New York, against the fleet of the Prince of Orange. This was at the time of the recapture of New York by the Dutch. He was a patentee of the town of Jamaica tinder the “Dongan Patent” of 1680, and the tract bought by him there was occupied by three generations after him. He married (probably) Hannah Hope. Children, born in Jamaica: John. 1658, mentioned elsewhere; Hope, married Mary ; William, 1662; Samuel, 1666; Solomon, 1670: Ruth, married Rhodes; Ludman; daughter, name not known, married...

Biography of Henry Seeley Taylor

HENRY SEELEY TAYLOR – Thirty-three years have passed since the death of Henry Seeley Taylor caused universal sorrow in the city of Pittsfield, yet many residents of the present day recall his fine face and distinguished figure, both in the clothing store of which he was long the head, and in his activities as a leading member of the Methodist Episcopal Church. As a business man Mr. Taylor was above reproach, his kindly courtesy and considerate interest in his customers having been only the outgrowth and evidence of an integrity which governed every act of his life. Friend of all, benevolent in a marked degree, and open hearted toward every worthy cause or movement, Mr. Taylor won his successful position in the business world through his tireless endeavors and excellent judgment, and those most closely affiliated with him in his business interests were most sincere in their praise and commendation of the man. Henry Seeley Taylor was born in Bethel, Connecticut, August 18, 1828, and died in Pittsfield, September 6, 1891. His education was limited to the advantages of the common schools, and when only a young man he entered the business world. The family became residents of Monterey, Massachusetts, and he was seventeen years old when the family removed to Lenox. There he resided for a number of years, and it was in that community that he married. In 1855, Mr. Taylor became associated with his father-in-law, James S. Davis, in a business interest in Pittsfield, and together they opened a clothing store, which became even in the early years of its history a leading enterprise of its...

Western Niantic Tribe

Western Niantic Indians. An Algonquian tribe formerly occupying the coast of Connecticut from Niantic bay to the Connecticut river. De Forest concluded that they once formed one tribe with the Rhode Island Niantic, which was cut in two by the Pequot invasion. Their principal village, also called Niantic, was near the present town of that name. They were subject to the Pequot, and had no political connection with the eastern Niantic. They were nearly destroyed in the Pequot war of 1637, and at its close the survivors were placed under the rule of the Mohegan. They numbered about 100 in 1638, and about 85 in 1761. Many joined the Brotherton Indians in New York about 1788, and none now exist under their own name. Kendall1 states that they had a small village near Danbury in 1809, but these were probably a remnant of the western Connecticut tribes, not Niantic. According to Speck2 several mixed Niantic Mohegan live at Mohegan, Connecticut, the descendants of a pure Niantic woman from the mouth of Niantic river. Their voices are commonly said to have been high-pitched in comparison with those of their neighbors.FootnotesKendall, Tray., 1809 ↩Speck, inf’n,...
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