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Ancestors of Warren A. Reed of Brockton Massachusetts

The Reed family of Brockton, Mass., a leading member of which was Judge Warren A. Reed, lawyer and jurist, who for over a third of a century had been one of the foremost citizens of Brockton, and during the greater part of that long period connected with the judicial, civic and financial interests of the city, district and State, is one of long and honorable standing in this Commonwealth, and one the forerunner of which came to these shores over two hundred and fifty years ago. Many members of this historic family have given good account of themselves, and many are there who have been prominent in the history of this country. An account of the branch of the family to which Judge Reed belongs is here given in chronological order, beginning with the earliest American ancestor.

Biography of George Musalas Colvocoresses

Born in Scio, Grecian Archipelago, October 22, 1816. During the Greek Revolution the Turks invaded that island in 1822, and after narrowly escaping the massacre that followed, George with his mother and two young sisters were carried captives to Smyrna. Through friends in that city he was ransomed and sent in an American brig to Baltimore; much kindness was shown him by members of the Greek Relief Committee, and the story of his misfortunes excited the sympathy of Captain Alden Partridge, head of the military academy then at Norwich, who offered to receive and provide for young Colvocoresses as his son. Accordingly, he was sent to Norwich and his kind benefactor educated him in his military academy and secured for him an appointment in the United States Navy in 1832. He was a passed midshipman in the Wilkes Exploring Expedition in the Pacific, 1838- ’42, and saw service in all parts of the world during his naval career. He married Miss Eliza Freelon Halsey, niece of Captain Thomas W. Freelon, U. S. N., in 1846, and Norwich continued to be his home until 1863, As lieutenant and second in command of the U. S. S. “Levant,” on the China station, he took part in the bombardment and capture of the Barrier Forts in the Canton River. At the outbreak of the Civil War he was ordered to the U. S. S. “Supply” and promoted to commander; while in this ship he captured the “Stephen Hart” of Liverpool, loaded with arms and ammunition for the rebels. He was in constant service along the Atlantic coast and in the Gulf of...

Biography of Doctor Thomas S. Brigham

Doctor Thomas S. Brigham was the oldest son of Honorable Paul Brigham, and was born in Coventry, Conn., in 1769, coming to Norwich with his father when twelve years of age. After reaching his majority he studied medicine (with what practitioner is not known) possibly with Doctor Joseph Lewis. This was before the founding of Dartmouth Medical College. When about twenty-five years old Mr. Brigham married Polly Dana, born in 1769, a daughter of General James Dana, and settled in town, where he practiced his profession for several years previous to 1809, when he removed from Norwich, going to Amesbury, Mass., where he married for the second time, becoming the father of five children by this union. From Amesbury he removed to Maine, where he located as a practicing physician. While living in Norwich three sons and two daughters were born to Doctor Brigham. These children and their mother remained in Norwich after the husband and father removed from town, and the family were never reunited thereafter. Doctor Brigham is said to have attained considerable eminence in his profession. He died in...

Narrative of the Captivity of Frances Noble – Indian Captivities

Narrative of the captivity of Frances Noble, who was, among others, taken by the Indians from Swan Island, in Maine, about the year 1755; compiled by John Kelly, Esq. of Concord, New Hampshire, from the minutes and memoranda of Phinehas Merrill. Esq. of Stratham, in the same state; and by the Former Gen. Tleman communicated for publication to the editors of the Historical Collections of New Hampshire.

Narrative of the Captivity of Nehemiah How

A Narrative of the captivity of Nehemiah How, who was taken by the Indians at the Great Meadow Fort above Fort Dummer, where he was an inhabitant, October 11th, 1745. Giving an account of what he met with in his traveling to Canada, and while he was in prison there. Together with an account of Mr. How’s death at Canada. Exceedingly valuable for the many items of exact intelligence therein recorded, relative to so many of the present inhabitants of New England, through those friends who endured the hardships of captivity in the mountain deserts and the damps of loathsome prisons. Had the author lived to have returned, and published his narrative himself, he doubtless would have made it far more valuable, but he was cut off while a prisoner, by the prison fever, in the fifty-fifth year of his age, after a captivity of one year, seven months, and fifteen days. He died May 25th, 1747, in the hospital at Quebec, after a sickness of about ten days. He was a husband and father, and greatly beloved by all who knew him.

Queen Anne’s War – Indian Wars

War was declared against France by Queen Anne, of England, in May, 1702, and, of course, the contest was renewed in America. Villebon, the governor of Canada, immediately began to encroach upon the northern frontier of the British colonies, and to instigate the Indians to commence their destructive ravages. Dudley, the governor of Massachusetts, visited Casco, Maine, in June, 1703, and held a conference with a number of Indian chiefs, and concluded a treaty which the Indians promised to observe as long as the sun and moon should continue. Not withstanding these protestations, they made an attack a few weeks after upon all the settlements from Casco to Wells, killing and taking one hundred and thirty persons, and destroying all in their way. On the 17th of August, 1703, a party of Indians attacked Hampton village, killed five persons, and plundered two houses. This alarmed the neighboring country, and the Indians fled. In the fall, Colonel March, of Casco, attacked a party of the enemy, killing six and taking six prisoners. Hostilities were suspended during the winter. In the spring, Colonel Church, renowned as the conqueror of Metacomet, planned an expedition against the Indians in Maine, and sailed from Boston, with a number of small boats, in May. At Green Island, he took a number of prisoners, and at Penobscot, he took or killed every Indian or Frenchman who could be found. Among the captives was a daughter of Castein, whom they kindly treated, though her father had been such a bloody foe of New England. Thence they proceeded, and drove the French and Indians from Passamaquaddy. Sailing across...

King William’s War – Indian Wars

The war commonly called by the colonists, “King William’s War,” commenced in 1688 and ended in 1697. The object of the French was the expulsion of the English from the northern and middle provinces. The English directed their efforts against Canada. The French secured the services of the greater part of the Indians, and the united forces spread death and desolation in all directions.

The Descendants of Thomas White of Marblehead

Thomas White is the first generation. His descendants who bear the family name stand in numerical order from himself to NO. 79. Small figures at the end of a name, thus, “THOMAS2″ indicate the generation to which the individual belongs. Figures in parentheses placed before a name, forming the subject of a distinct notice, thus, (2) THOMAS,” denote time numerical order in which he stands, and will be found by turning back to that number. Names in the family group, printed in large capitals, thus, “2. THOMAS2” i.e., number 2, Thomas, second generation, will be understood as subjects of future treatment, and may be found forward, under that generation, with the same number enclosed in parentheses before the name. This manuscript is currently undergoing a transformation. Give us a couple of days and it’ll be completely back. In the mean time you can read the digital book here: Descendants of Thomas White of Marblehead List of Article’s for The Descendants of Thomas White Michael and Joanna White Michael and Ruth (Rhoades) White There’s additional information still to come. Haskell Descendants The Haskell Family Will Of Roger Haskell, Of Beverly Mark Haskell Burial Expense of Mark Haskell Mark Haskell, Second Generation Mark Haskell, Third Generation Mark Haskell Fourth Generation Mark Haskell Fifth Generation Sixth Generation of Mark Haskell William Haskell Notice Of William Haskell Coombs Descendants Henry Coombs of Marblehead Marbelehead Massachusetts History and Records First and Second Churches in Marblehead Massachusetts Names of Rectors of St. Michael’s Protestant Episcopal Church, Marblehead,...

First and Second Churches in Marblehead Massachusetts

The first church in Marblehead was built in 1649. “From the earliest records of this town, it appears that as early as 1648, when ‘the Planta­tion,’ as it was called, contained forty-four families, there was preaching among them by Mr. Walton.” “Mr. Walton continued to officiate as a public teacher, though without ordination, about twenty years, till he was removed by death, in August or September, 1668, but a few weeks before the commencement of Mr. Cleever’s labors.’’ May 24, 1684. The brethren at Marblehead, finding a great incon­veniency in going to Salem, with the unanimous concurrence of the con­gregation, applied themselves to Mr. Samuel Cleever, who had been the minister among them for fifteen years and a half past, that he would take the office of a pastor, and themselves might be congregated into a particular society, for the enjoyment of all the ordinances in this place orderly, as in other towns and places in the country.’’ ‘The church was gathered Aug. 13, 1684, having fifty-four members. [Charity Pitman was one of the number.] SAMUEL CLEEVER, who had preached in Marblehead sixteen years, was ordained Aug. 13, 1684. Mr. Cleever was born at New haven, Conn., Sept. 22, 16:19, graduated at Harvard College in 1659, and died in the ministry at Marblehead, May 29, 1724, in the 85th year of his age, and of his ministry the fiftieth. ‘‘It is said that for forty-eight years he was never hindered from performing the duties of his office a single Sabbath.” JOHN BARNARD was ordained colleague of Mr. Cleever, July 18, 1716. Mr. Barnard was born at Boston, Nov. 6,...

Biography of Thomas Fuller

In 1638 THOMAS FULLER came from England to America upon a tour of observation, intending, after he should have gratified his curiosity by a survey of the wilderness world, to return. While in Massachusetts, he listened to the preaching of Rev. Thomas Shepard, of Cambridge, who was then in the midst of a splendid career of religious effort and eloquence, the echo of which, after the lapse of two centuries, has scarcely died away. Through his influence Thomas Fuller was led to take such an interest in the religion of the Puritan school, that the land of liturgies and religious formulas, which he had left behind, became less attractive to him than the ” forest aisles ” of America, where God might be freely worshiped. He has himself left on record a metrical statement of the change in his views which induced him to resolve to make his home in Massachusetts. These verses were collected by the Rev. Daniel Fuller of Gloucester from aged persons, who declare that the author was urged, but in vain, to publish them. Now, after the lapse of two centuries, we will favor the world with a few of them, which will serve as a sample: – “In thirty-eight I set my foot On this New England shore; My thoughts were then to stay one year, And here remain no more. But, by the preaching of God’s word By famous Shepard he, In what a woful state I was, I then began to see. Christ cast his garments over me, And all my sins did cover More precious to my soul was he Than...

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