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Lydia Mahala Todd West of Sandusky OH

WEST, Lydia Mahala Todd6, (Amos5, Charles4, Gideon3, Michael2, Christopher1) born July 15, 1824, married June 23, 1824, William Thompson, son of Abel and Matilda West, who was born June 15, 1815, at Washington, Mass. He was a merchant at Sandusky, Ohio. Children: I. Mary Campbell, b. March 5, 1847, d. Jan. 27, 1852. II. William Gilbert, b. June 26, 1850. III. King David, b. June 7, 1853. IV. Jeannie Matilda, b. Nov. 30, 1855. V. Carrie Antoinette, b. Oct. 28, 1859. VI. George Campbell, b. Sept. 12,...

Lavina Williams Todd Stewart of Milan OH

STEWART, Lavina Williams Todd6, (Amos5, Charles4, Gideon3, Michael2, Christopher1) born June 7, 1810, married in 1831, Hiram, son of Solomon and Nancy (Haven) Stewart, of Milan, Ohio, who was born March 28, 1808. He was a farmer at Bloomingville and Milan, Ohio. Children: I. Nancy Lurana, b. July 26, 1833, in New York, N. Y., d. April 6, 1852, at Bloomingville, Ohio. II. Mary Campbell, b. Nov. 15, 1836, m. May 2, 1867, Bernard Augustus Storch, who was b. at Rudolstadt, Germany. He was a physician. III. Martin Van Buren, b. Aug. 15, 1838, m. Sept. 20, 1861, Lucy Ann Hall, who was b. in 1839. He was a farmer at Milan, Ohio. IV. Ellen Todd, b. July 21, 1841, m. May 2, 1867, John Albro Bradley, a merchant at Medina, Ohio. He was b. Feb. 10, 1842. V. Charles Adams, b. June 23, 1848, m. Feb. 24, 1870, Josephine Newell, who was b. in 1850, he was a physician at Wakeman, Ohio. VI. Milton Sheldon, b. June 10,...

Roxa Ann Todd Boies of Homer NY

BOIES, Roxa Ann Todd6, (Amos5, Charles4, Gideon3, Michael2, Christopher1) born March 12, 1795, married April 21, 1813, Chester Boies, of Blanford, Mass., who was born Oct. 2, 1789, died Aug. 5, 1856; he was a farmer and lived at Homer, N. Y., then Oxford, Medina and Lyme, Ohio. Children: I. William Phelps, b. Aug. 8, 1815. II. Ann Maria, b. Nov. 1, 1816, d. Oct. 5, 1826. III. Caroline Eliza, b. June 6, 1818, d. Oct. 19, 1848, m. Ten Eyck Wells, who was a physician at one time at Litchfield, Conn. They had one son born in 1844, d. in 1845. IV. Samuel, b. Feb. 2, 1820. V. Joseph Strong, b. Feb. 8, 1824. VI. Mary Campbell, b. March 23, 1826, m. Benjamin L. Bullard, of Wadsworth, Ohio. VII. Chester Leroy, b. May 5, 1828. VIII. Amos Todd, b. June 5, 1832. IX. Charlotte Maria, b. Dec. 25, 1834, d. Feb. 17, 1863, m. Charles Ozias Scott, who was a physician at Barnesville, Ohio. X. Harriet Lucretia, b. Nov. 17, 1836, m. Oct. 4, 1865, Elbridge Gerry, son of Cyrus and Lydia Hart; he was a physician at Medina, Ohio. No...

Woodward Hezekiah Todd of Florence OH

Woodward Hezekiah Todd8, (Kneeland7, Moses6, Hezekiah5, Caleb4, Samuel3, Samuel2, Christopher1) born May 28, 1837, died Jan. 18, 1900, married May 17, 1877, Sophia C. Kline, who was born March 4, 1855, died Dec. 25, 1905. Mr. Todd was born in Wakeman, O., and died at his home in Florence, Erie County, O. Below is Mr. Todd’s obituary: At the age of eight years he moved with his parents to the home he occupied. This farm has been his residence over 54 years. In his younger days, he was a student in Oberlin College, and about that time he taught school during the winter months. He was a great fancier of poultry and pet stock, and began to gather fine specimens in 1868. His first exhibition was at the State Fair held in Toledo, Ohio, and there he won nearly all the prizes for which he tried. His next exhibit was at the Erie County Fair, at Sandusky, O., and nearly all the premiums he showed for went his way. He took his collection to the first great poultry show in northern O., at Cleveland and met in competition, the largest breeders and fanciers in the United States. While he carried off many prizes, together with the sweepstakes, he was not satisfied, and at that show he began to strengthen his collection by buying the first pair of Toulouse geese ever in Ohio, for which he paid $35. He also made many other valuable additions. I well remember what he said about the time, that certain fanciers in Illinois were receiving 100 letters a day and said, “I believe I...

Huron Tribe

Commonly known as the Huron Tribe, Huron Indians, Huron People, Huron First Nation, Wyandot Tribe, and Wyandot Indians (Huron – lexically from French huré, bristly,’ ‘bristled,’ from hure, rough hair’ (of the head), head of man or beast, wild boar’s head; old French, ‘muzzle of the wolf, lion,’ etc., ‘the scalp,’ ‘a wig’; Norman French, huré, ‘rugged’; Roumanian, hurée, ‘rough earth,’ and the suffix –on, expressive of depreciation and employed to form nouns referring to persons). The name Huron, frequently with an added epithet, like vilain, ‘base,’ was in use in France as early as 13581 as a name expressive of contumely, contempt, and insult, signifying approximately an unkempt person, knave, ruffian, lout, wretch. The peasants who rebelled against the nobility during the captivity of King John in England in 1358 were called both Hurons and Jacques or Jacques bons hornmes, the latter signifying approximately ‘simpleton Jacks,’ and so the term Jacquerie was applied to this revolt of the peasants. But Father Lalement2, in attempting to give the origin of the name Huron, says that about 40 years previous to his time, i. e., about 1600, when these people first reached the French trading posts on the St Lawrence, a French soldier or sailor, seeing some of these barbarians wearing their hair cropped and roached, gave them the name Hurons, their heads suggesting those of wild boars. Lalement declares that while what he had advanced concerning the origin of the name was the most authentic, “others attribute it to some other though similar origin.” But it certainly does not appear that the rebellious French peasants in 1358, mentioned above,...

Biography of W. L. Adams A.M., M.D.

W.L. ADAMS, A.M., M.D. – The subject of this biography, a pioneer who drove his own ox team across the plains in 1848, is one of the most unique of western characters; and history entitles him to be placed in the catalog of the illustrious men who bore prominent parts in settling Oregon, and in molding public sentiment. To give a full history of his life would require a large book; but our limited space would require a large book; but our limited space forbids anything but a rapid glance at a few waymarks along the road traveled for nearly sixty-nine years by one of the most original and energetic of men. The writer has known him well more than forty years, and has learned from his family and acquaintances enough of incidents and peculiarities to make a very readable biography. He was born in Painesville, Granger county, Ohio, February 5, 1821. His father was born in Vermont, as was his mother; and both emigrated to the “Western Reserve” when it was a wilderness. His father was a strong Whig, as were his relatives, the noted Adams family of Massachusetts, and a devoted friend of General Harrison, with whom he served in all of his Indian campaigns. His mother was an Allen, – a descendant of Ethan Allen, the “Hero of Ticonderoga.” Her mother and William Slade’s mother were sisters. Slade for many years was a leading free-soil member of the United States Senate, and afterwards Governor of Vermont. The whole family on both sides have ever been the unswerving foes of slavery and despotism. In 1823, his father...

Biography of Hon. Edwin N. Cooke

HON. EDWIN N. COOKE. – The subject of this sketch is a lineal descendant of the Puritans, who came to America in the ship Mayflower, and landed at Plymouth, Massachusetts, December 21, 1620. Among the passengers of that historical band were Francisco Cook and his son, John Cooke, who settled and the families of whom for many generations lived in that and other colonies, up to the time of the Revolutionary war. At the commencement of the Revolutionary war, Mr. Cooke’s great-grandfather, Asaph Cooke lived near Boston, Massachusetts, and had four sons who espoused the American cause and enlisted in the patriotic army, and remained there until the termination of the war, seven years afterward, serving with distinction, and afterwards marrying and rearing large families. The subject of our sketch has seen three of them when very old men, and heard them recount the story of the struggle over and over again. The grandfather of Mr. Cooke, after the Revolution, married Thankful Parker, and settled in Granville, Washington county, New York. He reared a family of four sons and one daughter. The eldest son, Asaph, was the father of E.N. Cooke, who married Mary Stewart in 1805, and had one son and one daughter born to them, when he moved in 1808 to Jefferson county of the same state, where Edwin N. Cooke was born, February 26, 1810, near where the town of Adams now stands. That portion of New York state was, at that time, almost a wilderness. In 1814 the family removed to their old home, where two more sons were born. In 1816 the family removed...

Biography of Mrs. Eliza Cooke

MRS. ELIZA COOKE. – All who are acquainted with the estimable lady whose name heads this brief résumé of her life well known that the best eulogy that can be written only illustrates how impossible it is to bear fitting portrayal of the genuine worth of so good and noble a woman. Grandma Cooke has ever been known in her intercourse with others to be generous and unselfish in the highest degree, one of the gentlest of mothers, the most patient of wives, an affectionate friend, and the kindest of neighbors. Whether meeting with trials incident to a long, tedious and dangerous journey across the plains, enduring the privations of pioneer life, or surrounded thereafter, as she has been, with a competence of life’s comforts, the tenor of her life has run in the same channel, ever manifesting to all about her those qualities which make the good, true woman akin to the angels. She was born in Rensselaer county, New York April 29, 1816. In early Rensselaer county, New York, April 29, 1816. In early life her parents removed to Ohio and located in Erie county. On September 5, 1835, she was married to Edwin N. Cooke, at Oxford, in that state. For a number of years they resided at Sandusky City, when they removed to Fremont, where they remained until their departure for Oregon in the fall of 1850. The health of Mr. Cooke being poor, they journeyed leisurely along, awaiting the approach of spring to commence the tedious journey necessary to be made before reaching the far-off Western home. She was accompanied by her niece, Miss...

Biography of Hon. Charles P. Cooke

HON. CHARLES P. COOKE – The subject of this sketch, whose portrait appears in this work, was born in Erie county, Ohio, in 1824. His early life was spent in his native place. In 1846 he went as a volunteer to the Mexican war, and served as second lieutenant in the first regiment of Ohio Volunteers. He was in the army a full year, and participated in the engagements at Monterey, Buena Vista and other bloody battles of that war. He then returned home, but in the spring of 1849 left for the Pacific coast, crossing the plains with ox-teams to California, where he remained until the spring of 1850, when he came to Oregon, arriving at Astoria in May. He resided in Polk county until 1867, when he emigrated to the Yakima country, taking his first claim in the Moxee valley. In 1870 he removed to the Kittitass valley, and has remained there until the present time. Mr. Cooke represented the Yakima and Klikitat counties in the legislature of 1873, and gain was representative of Yakima county in 1876. He represented Yakima and Kittitas counties jointly in 1886, and is now joint councilman for Yakima, Kittitass, Franklin, Adams, Lincoln and Douglas counties. He was the first auditor elected in Yakima county, and one of the county commissioners, and has been several times school superintendent. He also filed important offices of trust in Oregon as well as in this territory. He assisted in organizing the counties of Yakima and Kittitass. Mr. Cooke has developed a beautiful ranch, upon which he now lives. This is about twelve miles from Ellensburgh,...

Biographical Sketch of Hon. Melancthon Z. Goodell

HON. MELANCTHON Z. GOODELL. – The family of which this pioneer is a member has ever been prominent and influential in the Pacific Northwest since its arrival hither. Jothan W. Goodell, the father was a pioneer of Ohio; and it was at Vermilion that Melancthon was born in 1837. In 1850 the family crossed the plains, the eight children being deemed no serious hindrance. A stop-over was made at Salt Lake one winter; and it has been thought that they missed but little a great calamity from Mormon treachery. Reaching Portland in 1851, they made their first home in Polk county, Oregon, but in 1853 removed to Grand Mound, Washington Territory. When the Indian war broke out, young Melancthon enlisted in Captain Hay’s Company, serving ten months. At the dawn of peace following this troublesome period, he leased a farm in Lewis county, and was engaged in agriculture until 1860. His next home was near Elma, where he lived on a farm more than twenty years. In 1883 he occupied his present residence at Montesano, Washington, engaging in business as dealer in lumber and in real estate, being thus employed at present. His public services have been important and various, – two terms as sheriff and two terms as assessor of Chehalis county. In 1882 he held a seat in the legislature, to which he was re-elected in 1884. He is at present mayor of Montesano. He was married in 1858 to Miss Rebecca Byles, a native of Kentucky, but an early resident of Thurston county. They have eight...
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